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  • Nikon | Imaging Products | Our Product History
    AI version of the Nikomat FT2 1975 Nikomat Nikkormat FT3 Debut of Nikon F3 Part 6 Nikomat FTN Nikon FM Manual exposure SPD meter with precise LED display Usable with Motor Drive MD 11 Nikon FM Debut of Nikon F3 Part 9 Nikon FM Nikon EL2 AI version of the Nikomat ELW 1976 featuring SPD meter Shutter speed 1 1 000 to 8 s Nikon EL2 Debut of Nikon F3 Part 8 Nikomat ELW Nikon EL2 Nikon F2 Photomic AS AI version of the F2 Photomic SB 1976 Nikon F2 Photomic AS Debut of Nikon F3 Vol 4 Nikon F2 Part 12 Nikon FG FG20 1976 Nikomat Nikkormat ELW Modified version of the Nikomat EL 1972 Automatic Winder AW 1 can be used Nikomat Nikkormat ELW Debut of Nikon F3 Part 8 Nikomat ELW Nikon EL2 Nikon F2 Photomic SB Modified version of the F2 Photomic S 1973 with SPD Silicon Photo Diode meter and eyepiece shutter Nikon F2 Photomic SB Nikkor 13mm f 5 6 World s Firsts World s Firsts F mount interchangeable lens with the world s widest angle of view among wide angle lenses as of 1976 1975 Nikomat Nikkormat FT2 Modified version of the Nikomat FTN 1967 ISO type hot shoe contact and sync terminal with built in automatic M X switchover Nikomat Nikkormat FT2 Part 6 Nikomat FTN NIKONOS III Improved film advance version of NIKONOS II 1968 Built in bright frame in the viewfinder NIKONOS III Debut of Nikon F Evolution of NIKONOS Part 17 NIKONOS I II III Zoom Nikkor 28 45mm f 4 5 World s Firsts World s Firsts Full fledged wideangle zoom lens 1973 Nikon F2 Photomic S Exposure information displayed with two LEDs Automatic S control when using the EE Control Unit DS 1 Nikon F2 Photomic S

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/history/products_history/1970.htm (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Imaging Products | Our Product History
    the Nikomat FT without an exposure meter or mirror look up Nikomat Nikkormat FS Debut of Nikon F Part 5 Nikomat FT FS Nikon F Photomic T Nikon s first camera with a built in TTL exposure meter Nikon F Photomic T Debut of Nikon F2 1964 Nikon AUTO35 NIKKOREX AUTO35 First Nikon AE camera with shutter priority auto S mode Lens shutter SLR fixed 48mm f 2 with Quick return mirror Nikon AUTO35 NIKKOREX AUTO35 Debut of Nikon F Part 4 Nikon AUTO 35 1963 NIKKOREX ZOOM 35 Successor to the NIKKOREX 35 2 1962 fixed with Zoom NIKKOR 43 86mm f 3 5 NIKKOREX ZOOM 35 Debut of Nikon F Part 2 NIKKOREX Zoom35 NIKONOS Calypso NIKKOR Nikon s first underwater all weather camera Enables picture taking down to 50 m underwater NIKONOS Calypso NIKKOR Debut of Nikon F Evolution of NIKONOS Part 17 NIKONOS I II III 1962 Nikon F Photomic Nikon s first Photomic finder for the Nikon F 1959 viewfinder includes a built in external CdS cell exposure meter coupled to the Nikkor lens aperture and shutter speed Nikon F Photomic NIKKOREX 35 2 35II Successor to the NIKKOREX 35 1960 Improved lens shutter units NIKKOREX 35 2 35II Part 1 NIKKOREX 35 and NIKKOREX 35II 35 2 NIKKOREX F NIKKOR J Fixed pentaprism SLR having vertical traveling focal plane shutter 1 125 s flash sync Hinged camera back and coupled to NIKKOREX F Meter NIKKOREX F NIKKOR J Part 3 NIKKOREX F 1960 NIKKOREX 35 Lens shutter SLR fixed 50mm f 2 5 lens Wide and Tele converters available Includes a built in external Selen exposure meter NIKKOREX 35 Debut of Nikon F Part 1 NIKKOREX 35 and NIKKOREX 35II 35 2 Nikon S3M The first 17 5 x 24mm frame RF camera Accepts the motor drive for continuous shooting up to 6 fps Nikon S3M Nikon Rangefinder Cameras Vol 7 Nikon SP S3 S3M S4 Vol 10 History of the Nikon cameras and shutter mechanisms Part I 1959 Nikon S4 Simplified version of the Nikon S3 1958 Two viewfinder frames 5 and 10 5cm Nikon S4 Nikon Rangefinder Cameras Vol 7 Nikon SP S3 S3M S4 Vol 10 History of the Nikon cameras and shutter mechanisms Part I Nikon F NIKKOR F World s Firsts World s Firsts SLR with 100 frame coverage and large diameter bayonet mount A system oriented single lens reflex SLR camera with interchangeable viewfinders focusing screens and motor drive capability and coupled to Nikon F Meter Nikon F NIKKOR F Debut of Nikon F Vol 4 Nikon F2 Vol 5 Nikon F Vol 6 Nikon F part II Vol 10 History of the Nikon cameras and shutter mechanisms Part I Vol 12 Special titanium Nikon cameras and NASA cameras 1958 Nikon S3 A basic model of the Nikon SP 1957 Three viewfinder frames 3 5 5 and 10 5cm Nikon S3 Nikon Rangefinder Cameras Vol 7 Nikon SP S3 S3M S4 Vol 10 History of the Nikon cameras

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/history/products_history/1960.htm (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | ニコンのカメラで天体写真を始めよう。
    TOP ニコンのカメラで天体写真を撮ろう おすすめのNIKKORレンズ はじめての天体撮影 さまざまな天体撮影 いつかは挑戦したい天体望遠鏡 天体写真を始めるあなたへ EN JP ニコンのカメラで天体写真を始めよう ニコンのカメラで 天体写真を始めよう 夜空にきらめく満天の星 クレーターの陰影が魅力的な月 さまざまな姿を見せる惑星 神秘的な星雲や星団 この美しい世界を写真に残せたらどんなに素敵でしょう 撮るのが難しいイメージの天体写真ですが 実は特別な機材がなくても Nikon COOLPIX Nikon 1 ニコンデジタル一眼レフカメラなら気軽に挑戦できるのです さあ ニコンのデジタルカメラと一緒に天体写真の世界へ踏み出しましょう 監修 吉田隆行 夜空にきらめく満天の星 クレーターの陰影が魅力的な月 さまざまな姿を見せる惑星 神秘的な星雲や星団 この美しい世界を写真に残せたらどんなに素敵でしょう 撮るのが難しいイメージの天体写真ですが 実は特別な機材がなくても Nikon COOLPIX Nikon 1 ニコンデジタル一眼レフカメラなら気軽に挑戦できるのです

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/microsite/astrophotography/getstarted/jp/index.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Photograph the night sky with a Nikon
    camera shutter releases at a set interval up to 999 or 9 999 times depending on the camera With the COOLPIX P900 and P610 you can only select the interval time via presets Time lapse movie function Allows in camera creation of time lapse movies without the need of special software Exposure smoothing function This smoothes out the exposure fluctuations between the frames in both interval timer and time lapse movie shooting This helps production of smooth time lapse movies with little flickering when shooting sunrise or sunset in auto exposure mode P S A This function can also be enabled in exposure mode M manual Moon mode only with the COOLPIX P900 P610 Shooting the moon beautifully in a large scale is not an easy task if you re not familiar with it The COOLPIX P900 s and P610 s Moon mode lets you photograph the moon s surface dramatically with easy settings Guide the moon into the framing border at the wide angle end and a simple press of the OK button lets you zoom into the subject to the extreme telephoto end equivalent to 2 000 mm You can also adjust hue to reddish or bluish color and change brightness using exposure compensation H alpha support exclusive to the D810A The light transmission characteristics of the IR cut filter is altered to suit astrophotography shooting Brilliantly reproduces nebulae that emit H alpha wavelengths in red Long exposure manual M mode exclusive to the D810A Allows extra long exposure time without the need to set the camera to Bulb or Time mode Available exposure times are 60 120 180 240 300 600 and 900 seconds Virtual horizon display that remains lit in red in the viewfinder exclusive to the D810A The virtual horizon indicators remain lit in red in the viewfinder when in the Long exposure manual M mode in other modes the indicator turns off immediately This helps adjust the camera s level during star landscape shooting Digital SLR cameras recommended lineup Nikon 1 series Advanced Cameras with Interchangeable Lenses Nikon 1 J5 Compact digital cameras COOLPIX P900 P610 From star landscapes and star fields to star clusters and nebulae capture them with expanded versatility Nikon digital SLR cameras with a NIKKOR lens or a telescope The Milky Way shot with the Nikon D5500 fixed mount shooting Takayuki Yoshida Lens AF S DX NIKKOR 18 55mm f 3 5 5 6G VR II shot at 18 mm Image quality 14 bit RAW NEF Exposure M mode 45 seconds f 3 5 High ISO NR Long exposure NR Low On White balance Auto Sensitivity ISO 3200 The diurnal rotation around the Polar star captured with the Nikon D750 fixed mount shooting Takayuki Yoshida Lens AF S NIKKOR 20mm f 1 8G ED Image quality 14 bit RAW NEF Exposure M mode 10 minutes f 6 3 High ISO NR Long exposure NR Low On White balance Auto Sensitivity ISO 800 Star time lapse movies shot with a Nikon digital SLR camera Your browser does not support video tag Summer Milky Way setting into the horizon time lapse movie Takayuki Yoshida Camera D750 Lens AF S NIKKOR 14 24mm f 2 8G ED shot at 14mm Test shoot settings still images Exposure M mode 15 seconds f 3 5 High ISO NR Long exposure NR Normal Off White balance Color temperature 4500K Sensitivity ISO 6400 Auto ISO sensitivity control OFF Movie settings Frame size frame rate 1920x1080 30p Movie quality high quality Time lapse movie settings Interval 20 seconds Shooting time 2 hours Exposure smoothing Off Your browser does not support video tag The Pleiades and Orion rising from the east interval timer photography Takayuki Yoshida Camera D750 Lens AF S NIKKOR 24mm f 1 4G ED Test shoot settings still images Image quality 14 bit RAW NEF Exposure M mode 15 seconds f 2 8 High ISO NR Long exposure NR Normal Off White balance Color temperature 4500K Sensitivity ISO 6400 Auto ISO sensitivity control OFF Interval timer photography settings Start Now Interval 20 seconds No of shots 1000x1 aborted at 644 shots due to rain Exposure smoothing Off Post shoot image processing Captured RAW images are developed using third party image processing software After adjusting white balance the hue of passing clouds is lowered then the brightness of the stars is enhanced using sharp filter Processed files are then saved into JPEG format to composite them into a time lapse movie using another third party software Tips Time lapse movie function automatic production in camera Fix your composition with still image test shots before you start movie recording 1 Adjust Picture Control according to your preference 2 Determine exposure shutter speed aperture ISO sensitivity 3 Set white balance 4 Take test shots with still images 5 Start time lapse movie recording Interval timer photography function a time lapse movie is produced after shooting using third party software Shooting composite frames in RAW file format allows you to adjust Picture Control exposure and white balance flexibly The time lapse movie function is an easy way to enjoy producing time lapse movies while the interval timer photography function allows a greater freedom to create elaborate movies reflecting your intentions Nikon s original exposure smoothing function helps produce time lapse movies with smooth brightness change Click here for the exposure smoothing function Your browser does not support video tag From sunset to moonlight night time lapse movie Takayuki Yoshida Camera D750 Lens AF S NIKKOR 14 24mm f 2 8G ED shot at 20 mm Test shoot settings still images Exposure A mode f 6 3 High ISO NR Long exposure NR Normal Off White balance Color temperature 4500K Sensitivity ISO 100 Auto ISO sensitivity control ON up to ISO 6400 Movie settings Frame size frame rate 1920x1080 30p Movie quality high quality Time lapse movie settings Interval 15 seconds Shooting time 2 hours Exposure smoothing On Recommended Nikon digital SLR cameras Nikon offers a full range of digital SLR

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/microsite/astrophotography/getstarted/camera/index.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Recommended NIKKOR lenses
    image reproduction across the entire frame AF S NIKKOR 35mm f 1 4G This fast wide angle prime with a 63 angle of view is good for framing a part of a constellation or a specific feature in the Milky Way It is also suitable for shooting a widely spread nebula when used with a DX format camera Its sharpness across the entire frame gives it versatility for various uses whether in fixed mount or tracking mount shooting AF S NIKKOR 35mm f 1 8G ED This compact and lightweight wide angle lens realizes superior point image reproduction It also delivers the high resolving power and sharp rendering capability of prime lenses Its angle of view of 63 is suited to framing part of a constellation or a specific feature in the Milky Way The lightweight body facilitates loading the lens and camera to a portable tracking mount AF S DX NIKKOR 10 24mm f 3 5 4 5G ED This 2 4x ultra wide zoom for the DX format delivers a stunningly wide angle The angle of view of 109 at the maximum wide angle position means you can capture the great summer triangle from Sagittarius to Cygnus along with the Milky Way The zoom range of this lens allows various compositions combining the stellar sky with landscapes Normal lenses Normal lenses are those with a focal length of around 50 mm FX 35mm format equivalent Their fast maximum aperture means that you can use a fast shutter speed to capture stars As with wide angle lenses the normal lenses are handy for beginners and could be used for capturing the Milky Way or constellations for example Recommended subjects Lens AF S NIKKOR 58mm f 1 4G Bright part of the Milky Way in the vicinity of Sagittarius tracking mount shooting Takayuki Yoshida Camera D750 Mount Vixen AP Equatorial mount sidereal time tracking Image quality 14 bit RAW NEF Exposure M mode 60 seconds f 2 8 composite of two frames High ISO NR Long exposure NR Low On White balance Auto Sensitivity ISO 3200 Lens AF S DX NIKKOR 35mm f 1 8G Cygnus tracking mount shooting Takayuki Yoshida Camera D5500 Mount Vixen Polarie Celestial tracking mode Image quality 14 bit RAW NEF Exposure M mode 120 seconds f 3 2 High ISO NR Long exposure NR Low On White balance Auto Sensitivity ISO 1250 Recommended normal lenses AF S NIKKOR 50mm f 1 8G At approx 185 g this remarkably light and compact normal lens achieves fine image quality with a new optical design including an aspherical lens element With the fast maximum aperture of f 1 8 it is suitable for shooting nebulae that spread across the night sky with a pale light Its angle of view is suitable for aiming at the densest and brightest parts of the Milky Way AF S NIKKOR 58mm f 1 4G This fast prime lens finely reproduces point light sources such as the stars and city lights as point

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/microsite/astrophotography/getstarted/lens/index.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Astrophotography: a primer
    gets more difficult as it gets dark 1 Take out your equipment tripod camera lens with hood and remote cord 2 Roughly decide the height of your camera with your hands and extend the tripod legs according to your planned composition Tips Extend the tripod legs by releasing the lock levers from the top The legs get slimmer towards their foot Do not extend the legs too far as this might compromise stability Camera shake is more easily avoided if it sits on a tripod with thicker legs Tips Extend the tripod legs by releasing the lock levers from the top The legs get slimmer towards their foot Do not extend the legs too far as this might compromise stability Camera shake is more easily avoided if it sits on a tripod with thicker legs 3 Place the tripod on a solid surface Make sure that the legs are fully open and stabilized Tips Place a solid board or other material on a slope or loose soil to stabilize the tripod Tips Place a solid board or other material on a slope or loose soil to stabilize the tripod 4 Firmly fix the camera on the mount head then attach to the tripod Double check that they are tightly attached 5 Attach the remote cord to the camera not necessary if you use the Exposure Delay Mode or the Self Timer Setup complete Shooting workflow There are particular ways to setup the camera for astrophotography We will show you the workflow employed to take the image illustrated Use the following procedure and settings as reference for your first shoot Lens AF S DX NIKKOR 18 55mm f 3 5 5 6G ED VR II Camera Nikon digital SLR camera D5500 Takayuki Yoshida Image quality 14 bit RAW NEF Exposure M mode 45 seconds f 3 5 High ISO NR Long exposure NR Low On White balance Auto Sensitivity ISO 3200 Post shoot image processing Using a third party image processing software white balance is adjusted to achieve neutral gray in the background Contrast is enhanced with the tone curve so that the Milky Way is rendered with a feel of depth Lastly the saturation is slightly enhanced to give the stars more color 1 Set the shooting mode to M manual Tips Autoexposure setting such as the P programmed auto and A aperture priority auto are not suitable for shooting the stellar sky Check the user s manuals on how to shoot with your camera in M mode Tips Autoexposure setting such as the P programmed auto and A aperture priority auto are not suitable for shooting the stellar sky Check the user s manuals on how to shoot with your camera in M mode 2 Set the monitor brightness to the dimmest position Tips The camera s LCD monitor will be too bright for your dark adapted vision Set it to the lowest brightness Tips The camera s LCD monitor will be too bright for your dark adapted vision

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/microsite/astrophotography/getstarted/beginer/index.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | An array of stars awaits your challenge
    you would miss out on with fixed mount photography A portable tracking mount will be handy for your first challenge The great summer triangle shot with a Nikon digital SLR camera D5500 using a portable tracking mount Takayuki Yoshida Lens AF S DX NIKKOR 18 55mm f 3 5 5 6G VR II shot at 18 mm Filter Kenko MC PRO Softon A Mount Vixen Polarie Celestial tracking mode Image quality 14 bit RAW NEF Exposure M mode 180 seconds f 4 High ISO NR Long exposure NR Low On White balance Auto Sensitivity ISO 1600 Post shoot processing Using third party image processing software the white balance is adjusted to achieve neutral gray in the background The contrast is enhanced so that the Milky Way across the summer triangle is emphasized Lastly faint stars are enhanced using the sharp filter Post shoot processing Using third party image processing software the white balance is adjusted to achieve neutral gray in the background The contrast is enhanced so that the Milky Way galaxy across the summer triangle is emphasized Lastly fine stars are enhanced using the sharp filter Equipment Nikon digital SLR camera or Nikon 1 series Advanced Camera with Interchangeable lenses Lens fast wide angle lens or normal lens Tripod Tripod head Remote cord Equatorial mount What is an equatorial mount The stars and stellar objects are in constant diurnal motion moving slowly across the celestial sphere An equatorial mount is a device made to follow that movement The motor inside the device drives the mount gradually rotating around the polar axis thus allowing you to track the diurnal movement of the stars and capture them as point images Setup Setting example A camera A on a mount head B is fixed onto the rotating axis of a portable tracking mount C The tracking mount in turn is fixed onto a camera tripod via a tripod head D so that its rotating axis is aligned to the earth s axis The camera starts following the diurnal motion of the stars as it is turned on You ll need to set up the tracking mount before you start shooting For more information about the use of your equatorial mount refer to the manufacturer s website Nikon D5500 attached to a tracking mount A Camera B Mount head C Tracking mount D Tripod head Equipment courtesy of VIXEN CO Ltd Tips When using equipment with a heavy total weight e g an FX format digital SLR camera with a long focal length lens be sure to use an equatorial mount with ample load weight capacity Click here to learn about fixed mount shooting Lunar photography For us on Earth the moon presents itself as the most familiar of all astronomical subjects To get a shot using a digital SLR that has the moon filling the whole frame you would normally need heavy equipment like a lens with a long focal length or an astronomical telescope For a simpler way to enjoy lunar

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/microsite/astrophotography/getstarted/various/index.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Nikon | Advanced steps: with an astronomical telescope
    you ll take an astronomical telescope in hand and draw closer to the universe by capturing the prismatic beauty of the nebulae with your camera Conceptual image Equipment courtesy of TAKAHASHI SEISAKUSHO Ltd Conceptual image Equipment courtesy of VIXEN CO Ltd Photography using an astronomical telescope There is starlight that cannot be photographed using simply a digital camera alone Let us look at a few examples of photographs shot with the D5500 and the D750 mounted to an astronomical telescope The Wild Duck Cluster M11 faint stars shining in a constellation This is the stellar region near M11 an open cluster in Scutum The Milky Way grows dense just around this region and near the Omega Nebula M17 in Sagittarius is a star cluster called the Sagittarius Star Cloud Looking through binoculars you ll be able to see this cluster of stars which has a beauty equaling even that of the regions nearest the heart of the Milky Way Higher above the southern horizon than the astronomical bodies near Sagittarius this stellar region is an easier subject owing to diminished influences from low altitude effects like haze The D5500 was used for this shot Equipped with a vari angle monitor the D5500 can boast greater ease of use when you need to check your photographic subject In addition it can count among its abilities its superb resolving power which can discern the individual stars within a star cluster Wild Duck Cluster M11 shot with the D5500 Takayuki Yoshida Telescope Vixen VSD100F3 8 Astrograph Mount Vixen SXP equatorial mount with autoguider tracking Image quality 14 bit RAW NEF Exposure M mode composite of 4 images each shot at 180 seconds High ISO NR Long exposure NR Off Off White balance Auto Sensitivity ISO 1250 The Sagittarius Star Cloud a gorgeous accumulation

    Original URL path: http://chsvimg.nikon.com/lineup/microsite/astrophotography/getstarted/challenge/index.html (2016-02-17)
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