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  • Maryrose Mullen, Author at New Jersey Monthly
    City s secret spying campaign has opened painful new wounds and aggravated old racial rifts Seen in Jersey Living Politics Public Affairs The Muck Stops Here February 13 2012 After 30 years of talk and legal wrangling a mountain of contaminated goo is about to be hauled up from the bottom of the Passaic River Seen in Jersey Living Outdoors Politics Public Affairs Science Steel Dreams Deferred October 10 2011 Gateway has replaced ARC as Jersey s best hope to ease train travel to Manhattan But will Amtrak s plan ever get rolling Seen in Jersey Living Jersey Grown System Tracks Underwater Threats June 13 2011 Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed and built a system that tracks underwater threats to public safety Seen in Jersey Living Politics Public Affairs Science Stepping Up Communicaiton in Post 9 11 New Jersey Improved communications systems help New Jersey react better when disaster strikes Seen in Jersey Living Politics Public Affairs Are We Safe The arrest in Yemen of a former Jersey nuclear plant worker has raised serious security questions The bottom line Can we protect ourselves from homegrown terror Seen in Jersey Living Politics Public Affairs 7 Songs to Comfort Christie on His Failed Presidential Bid Podcast Why We re Called The Garden State Table Hopping Jersey Shore Restaurant Week Melange in Somerville A Dress For Every Occasion NJ Father and Son s Wines Win Big 7 Dining Trends to Watch in 2016 February 2016 Best New Restaurants Table of Contents Subscribe Give a Gift Locate a Newsstand Purchase back issues View older issues Paper Mill Playhouse presents A Bronx Tale Millburn Feb 04 Mar 06 Frozen in Ice at Skylands Stadium Augusta Feb 05 Feb 28 The Beach Boys Morristown Feb 10 SOMA Film Festival South Orange Feb 12

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/authors/anthony-depalma/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Lauren Bowers, Author at New Jersey Monthly
    Style Shopping Gift Guide For The Chef December 2 2015 Give these gifts to whoever spends the most time in the kitchen Seen in Eat Drink Gift Guides Just For the Web Listicle Style Shopping 25 Days of Holiday House Tours November 25 2015 Tis the season to enjoy these wondrous holiday events Seen in Events Historic Jersey Just For the Web Listicle A Hiking We Will Go Exploring Jersey s Trails November 18 2015 Hundreds of miles of hiking await you Seen in Day Trips Jersey Living Just For the Web Listicle Outdoors Shine On Bulbrite in Moonachie November 2 2015 The spirit of innovation makes the Choi family a bright light in the lighting business Seen in People What We re Up To This Weekend October 23 2015 The Garden State is full of great events restaurants and activities we re heading out to explore a few of them Seen in Events Jersey Living Just For the Web Listicle Lonely Dracula Visits NJ Sites on Instagram October 13 2015 This Asbury Park Instagrammer is looking for her necks victim Seen in Culture Corner Just For the Web 13 Haunting Ghost Tales and Trails October 8 2015 Journey through time as you traverse the streets of these historic downtowns on these frightening and enlightening ghost tours Seen in Culture Corner Historic Jersey Just For the Web Listicle Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 7 Songs to Comfort Christie on His Failed Presidential Bid Podcast Why We re Called The Garden State Table Hopping Jersey Shore Restaurant Week Melange in Somerville A Dress For Every Occasion NJ Father and Son s Wines Win Big 7 Dining Trends to Watch in 2016 February 2016 Best New Restaurants Table of Contents Subscribe Give a Gift Locate a Newsstand Purchase back

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/authors/laurenbowers/ (2016-02-11)
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  • A Hiker Near The Delaware Water Gap Learns Lessons About Mount Tammany The Hard Way
    portion of the Appalachian Trail blazed in white It is a serene walk No more than a quarter mile from the parking lot the babble of a brook muffles the truck traffic from I 80 There is a spot canopied by tall trees to sit on a rock and gaze at the water gurgling in the shallow brook which runs clean and clear Gray rock walls with ferns sprouting from the cracks plummet to the brook to form a cool backdrop Sunlight filters through the birches Falling leaves sparkle as if under a spotlight as they spiral down to the water The trails are remarkably litter free at a stand along the way yellow bags are available to carry out your trash Following the blue blazes on the tree trunks I crossed a footbridge just downstream from an effervescent cascade and proceeded up the mountain Recommended Reading Red Ripe and Ready The New Jersey Tomato Soon the Appalachian Trail branches off continuing northward through Worthington State Forest and the National Recreation Area Here I picked up the Dunnfield Hollow Trail blazed in green Further on this trail branches off at the point where the Blue Dot Trail begins The Dunnfield Hollow Trail continues east for four miles to Sunfish Pond This is a flatter alternative that skirts Tammany but I wanted to conquer the mountain The Blue Dot Trail is rocky and appears at times to go straight up like a long flight of stairs As you ascend maples give way to oaks Taking my time I stopped to sit on a log and be cooled by the breeze Birds chirped A lizard gamboled by Later I encountered two deer their auburn coats glowing in the speckled sunshine I spotted ants dancing on the rocks Fellow hikers all heading down the mountain smiled and said hello I finally reached a blissfully flat ridgeline a fire road at the top of the mountain The ridgeline is rocky and covered with grass so step carefully when it is damp At the end of the Blue Dot Trail I arrived at the much photographed Indian Head scenic view From Indian Head named for its stony profile said to resemble Chief Tammany of the Lenape tribe you can see Mount Tammany s Pennsylvania counterpart Mount Minsi a craggy 1 461 foot peak looming on the other side of the Delaware The view was radiant with autumn colors Below me the green river shimmered in the warm afternoon sun A hawk made his rounds sweeping through the gorge with the other big birds pausing in their southward migration After taking in the view for awhile I started down the mountain on the Red Dot Trail No more than 100 or 200 feet below the summit I lost my balance tripped and smacked face first into one of the trail s big round rocks Shawangunk conglomerate according to the guidebooks My head hit the rock or rocks in no fewer than five places opening bloody gashes

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/falling-literally-for-mount-tammany/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Ellis Island's ferry termials reopens to the public-www.njmonthly.com
    first building on New Jersey s side of the island to reopen to the public since the U S Coast Guard closed the terminal in 1954 From 1892 to 1954 this was the spot where millions of immigrants waited to board the ferry to mainland America after their ocean crossing The April 2 grand re opening of the 1934 art deco style structure will reveal restored terra cotta wainscoting terrazzo flooring and a bronze chandelier The first exhibit covering the country s peak immigration period in the early twentieth century will feature multimedia presentations and stories from doctors and nurses who ran the island s hospital system It s something New Jersey can be proud of says Elizabeth Jeffery director of program development for Save Ellis Island one of the organizations behind the 4 million facelift Those buildings were falling into the Hudson If New Jersey hadn t taken responsibility for what was happening they would be lost Read more Best Of Jersey articles By submitting comments you grant permission for all or part of those comments to appear in the print edition of New Jersey Monthly 7 Songs to Comfort Christie on His Failed Presidential Bid Podcast Why We re Called The Garden State Table Hopping Jersey Shore Restaurant Week Melange in Somerville A Dress For Every Occasion NJ Father and Son s Wines Win Big 7 Dining Trends to Watch in 2016 February 2016 Best New Restaurants Table of Contents Subscribe Give a Gift Locate a Newsstand Purchase back issues View older issues Paper Mill Playhouse presents A Bronx Tale Millburn Feb 04 Mar 06 Frozen in Ice at Skylands Stadium Augusta Feb 05 Feb 28 The Beach Boys Morristown Feb 10 SOMA Film Festival South Orange Feb 12 Feb 14 Marc Anthony Concierto del Día de San

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/best-of-jersey/an_ellis_island_gem_sparkles_again/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Sites, attractions and dining on the Hudson River Waterfront Walkway-www.njmonthly.com
    waterfront dining Popular entrées include snapper Hemingway shrimp fresca and Dungeness crab clusters 201 348 6628 chart house com The Port Imperial marina and surrounding development provide docking facilities and a 10 5 acre recreation area including a turf field six lane running track tennis courts and an amphitheater for up to 200 people The nonprofit association SailNY has offered affordable sailing on the riverfront for more than a decade With a fleet of five 27 foot Solings three cruisers and two safety boats SailNY has a full program of instructional racing and recreational sailing 212 400 1668 sailny org Hoboken The city has numerous parks including Pier A Park with its water jet fountain bike paths and a gazebo and the new Pier C Park with slides climbable slopes and a tricycle path Maxwell Place Park Beach opened in 2007 features a sandy shore for family fun Recommended Reading The Last Nest Saving Our Bald Eagle Population Opened in 2008 Hoboken Cove is the first free public boathouse on the New Jersey side of the Hudson It includes a 10 acre park with play areas and the first kayaking program on the west bank From here you can access Frank Sinatra Park via kayak Castle Point the highest point in Hoboken is part of the Stevens Institute of Technology campus It includes historic Sybil s Cave currently closed to the public as well as Castle Point Park and a waterfront skate park Teak on the Hudson is an attractive restaurant with Asian inspired ambience transformed nightly into a popular lounge with high tech sound and light system and enticing cocktails 201 653 6888 teakonthehudson com St Patrick s Day is celebrated on the first Saturday in March with a parade at Washington and Fourteenth Streets This year s party takes place March 7 Buy a beer and grab a seat on the parade route Jersey City With a backdrop of Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty Liberty State Park unfurls a green oasis on the shore of the Hudson libertystatepark org The park includes the Liberty Science Center New Jersey s first interactive science museum lsc org and fine dining at the Liberty House Restaurant 201 395 0300 libertyhouserestaurant com There are also nature trails a large lawn for recreation a boat launch and Steve and Doris Colgate s Offshore Sailing School 800 221 4326 offshore sailing com Built in 1924 the Colgate Clock which faces Manhattan harkens back to the days when factories dominated the waterfront The largest clock in the world it is 50 feet in diameter and is located about 100 yards from the Goldman Sachs Tower the tallest skyscraper in the state Bayonne Located on the Peninsula at Bayonne Harbor Cape Liberty Cruise Port opened in May 2004 and brought back passenger ships to the shores of New Jersey The port s primary tenants are Celebrity Cruises and Royal Caribbean 201 823 3737 cruiseliberty com Also on the Peninsula is the Tear of Grief

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/walking-the-waterfront/ (2016-02-11)
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  • New Jersey celebrates the 75th anniversary of Thomas Edison's death-www.njmonthly.com
    two sons Thomas Jr and William Leslie During those years in Newark Edison assembled a group of skilled assistants whom he playfully called muckers They in turn humorously referred to him as the old man Only in his mid twenties this cigar smoking tobacco chewing buckeye with a mop of chestnut colored hair and bright eyes was driven Edison was easily consumed by his projects stopping only to eat or nap in a chair or at a worktable John Ott labored at Edison s side for more than 50 years He made me feel that I was making something with him Ott said And we all hoped to get rich with him Many of them did since Edison rewarded valued and loyal assistants with interests in his inventions Edison s Newark factory was a success but he wanted to create a center for invention So in 1876 he sold the factory and bought a house and land in rural Menlo Park Taking two dozen trusted assistants with him he built a two story white clapboard building 100 feet long by 30 feet wide The mandate for this invention factory was simple to create For once he d leave the manufacturing to someone else The lab had every resource imaginable from chemicals to a machine shop and Edison boldly declared that he and his crew would turn out a minor invention every ten days and a big one every six months or so Edison ignored the doubters and was awarded roughly 40 patents annually Recommended Reading Charlie Puth Rumson s Pop Prodigy I readily absorb ideas from every source frequently starting where the last person left off Edison once said One of his first projects at Menlo Park was to design a telephone for Western Union that would compete with Alexander Graham Bell s new invention Edison s design separated a receiver held to the ear from a mouthpiece that amplified a person s voice over long distances His patents revolutionized the telephone but management at Western Union believed it had little use Foolishly they sold the patent rights to Edison s improvements to Bell s investors Edison s telephone inspired what he would later call his greatest accomplishment the phonograph In the fall of 1877 Edison and his chief machinist John Kruesi constructed the first iteration of the machine The first recording Edison s rendition of Mary Had a Little Lamb The world was stunned and the Wizard of Menlo Park was heralded around the world At the time however Edison wasn t convinced that it would be a commercial hit so he put all his energies into the light project Many scientists had tried to invent a practical electric light before Edison but all had failed After conducting preliminary experiments Edison brazenly proclaimed that he was about to render gaslights obsolete In 1878 gas was noxious and dangerous but it generated 150 million in annual revenues for U S gaslight companies Edison s boast and that 150 000 investment

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/no-doubting-thomas/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Barnegat Bay Was One A Vast Food Factory, But Development and Pollution Threaten Its Delicate Ecosystem
    effect on the larger food web of the bay and its estuaries he explains It s such a serious problem that it begins to destroy the network that holds the system together like a cancer on the natural environment The excess nutrients wouldn t be such a serious problem if not for three characteristics of the bay and its watershed First whatever goes into Barnegat Bay tends to stay there a long time Kennish says Bigger bodies of water in the region such as the Delaware and Raritan bays are fed by large river driven estuaries and ocean inlets that act like enormous purifying pumps rapidly filtering the bay water and sending it out to the sea Barnegat Bay on the other hand is a coastal lagoon walled off from the Atlantic by long barrier islands and fed by much smaller estuaries Water entering the bay takes about 74 days to turn over during summer months less in winter That means pollutants hang around Second when the Ocean and Monmouth county development boom started in the second half of the 20th century the soil was compacted to support roads and buildings That impedes natural filtration According to recent studies by the Ocean County Soil Conservation District compacted sands in much of the northern watershed have a density approaching that of concrete Finally more than 2 500 storm water basins in the area empty into the bay The basins built to collect rainwater and prevent flooding are not designed to filter pollutants Thus heavy rainfalls flush the pollutants into the bay Between the compacted soil these water basins and impervious surfaces like roads driveways and parking lots nothing is being filtered says Kennish Then you add more people more lawns more fertilizer and this is what you get Our analysis at Rutgers is that things are beyond the tipping point of what the bay can handle In December 2010 Governor Christie thrust Barnegat Bay into the spotlight by unveiling a 10 point action plan to prevent further degradation of the bay and begin the restoration of this incredible New Jersey resource The ambitious checklist called for funding to reduce storm water runoff and pollution from fertilizer the acquistion of land in the watershed to protect it from further development and the shutdown of the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant in the Forked River section of Lacey Township Recommended Reading Red Ripe and Ready The New Jersey Tomato I think it s been a very successful plan says Kerry Kirk Pflugh manager of constituent services for the state s Department of Environmental Protection DEP and liaison to two national estuary programs We re by no means done and a lot of work remains But I think we ve made tremendous progress on each of these points Some more than others On the plus side Christie struck a deal with the Chicago based Exelon Corp to close Oyster Creek in 2019 a decade earlier than originally slated The governor also made 28 8 million available for storm water management projects to help retrofit the existing basins with up to date designs that filter out pollutants Christie has also committed nearly 3 million to the purchase and preservation of more than 2 000 watershed acres including 180 acres recently added to the DEP s Forestry Resource Education Center in Jackson 306 acres added to Double Trouble State Park and 836 acres of previously unprotected Pinelands in Ocean Township The governor has said the state is committed to purchasing about 30 000 acres of watershed property over the next 30 years To tackle the nutrient problem Christie signed legislation in January 2011 that established the strictest fertilizer standards in the nation Under the new rules all fertilizer sold in the state must contain at least 20 percent slow release nitrogen which is not water soluble and doesn t wash away as easily and zero phosphorus The law also bars the use of fertilizer between November and March when the ground is often hard or frozen and impervious He s made a tremendous commitment to the bay and I think he deserves credit for that says Stan Hales director of the Barnegat Bay Partnership one of 28 National Estuary Programs throughout the United States aimed at improving the health of the country s waterways But it s important to remember that these problems didn t pop up overnight and they re not going to be fixed overnight Hales says he is optimistic that the governor s plan will produce substantial results in the long run He notes however that 35 percent of the bay s watershed is developed The fate of the remaining 65 percent is uncertain We need to think more carefully about how we treat the land Hales says We ve let people develop right up to the water s edge and that s generally not a good thing to do anywhere We need to do a better job addressing the problem at its source Politically speaking that is a tricky matter According to Carleton Montgomery executive director of the Pinelands Preservation Alliance the Barnegat watershed falls under three different and often conflicting jurisdictions About a third lies in the Pinelands which are protected by state and federal law from development Another third lies in the Coastal Zone where development is regulated by the state DEP And the final northernmost chunk is subject to municipal zoning Without a coordinated effort residential and commercial sprawl could conceivably proceed at its current pace Consider how much growth has occurred in just one area town According to the 2010 U S Census the population of Lakewood in Ocean County expanded from 60 352 in 2000 to 92 843 in 2010 That 54 percent jump has made Lakewood the seventh most populous municipality in the state Like Hales Montgomery is pleased that an action plan exists but maintains that the state has not done enough He points out that the governor s plan calls for the establishment of

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-shore/saving-barnegat/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Pete Dunne Is Sharing His Love For Avian Life With Lucky Groups of Bird Watchers In Cape May
    them He feels it is his mission to help Detecting the watchiti watchiti watchiti of a common yellowthroat he encourages his crowd to listen Most people even walking here down this trail wouldn t hear that he says For most humans bird sounds don t get through the spam filter Dunne has been listening and looking since he was a boy growing up in Whippany His family s home backed up onto several hundred acres of preserved woodland where he ventured on a regular basis That was back when life was casual enough that parents didn t care whether you disappeared in the woods all day if you came back for dinner he says The woodlands were my classroom Dunne himself has been married for 24 years but never had children We opted for Labrador retrievers instead of kids he says Never found reason to regret the choice Recommended Reading Red Ripe and Ready The New Jersey Tomato As a youth Dunne especially loved the sounds and sights of birds and small animals but he didn t think of it in an academic way He went to Kean University then Newark State College majoring in political science After graduation he took a job as a carpet installer which gave him a good income and plenty of time to observe wildlife Within a few years he had accumulated enough cash to travel around the United States observing nature He enrolled in the University of Alaska to study ornithology but only lasted a week I didn t want to study birds that way he says His preference was to learn from them in their natural habitats Returning to the East Coast he earned a little cash by hawk watching for nature societies before landing the Cape May gig These days he conducts classes writes for the Audubon publications supervises other naturalists and takes his Monday morning fans around the bird refuge The tour costs 6 for Audubon Society members 10 for nonmembers No preregistration required Visit birdcapemay org for more information It gets my week off to a great start says Dunne of the weekly tour I have to sit in front of a computer like a lot of people for much of my job but if I can start Monday mornings like this well who could complain Lynne Mahle and Robert and Gretchen Downing friends from North Wales northwest of Philadelphia certainly were not complaining Big time birders they came to Stone Harbor just north of Cape May for a vacation but also with the idea of venturing out with Dunne He s the man says Gretchen Cape May is wonderful on its own but you shouldn t come here without going out with him Around one bend in the trail is a pond surrounded by a meadow Dunne gazes through his telescope a sophisticated piece of apparatus supported by a tripod Wow Amazing You almost never see the semipalmations in a semipalmated sandpiper he says pointing out the webbing on

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/cape-mays-birdman/ (2016-02-11)
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