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  • Good Stuff Cheap: The Best Bargains in NJ
    and thrift stores North Jersey Central Jersey South Jersey RUMMAGING AROUND NEW JERSEY Support charities while you shop OFF PRICE APPAREL Brand new and deeply discounted items DECORATING DISCOUNTS Best bargains for the home OPT IN FOR OUTLETS Find the outlets that are clearinghouses for haute couture and quality goods alike SALVAGE SURPLUS Slightly used and recycled building materials are a do it yourself dream SOLD Put Jersey s auction houses on your map BETTER BRING A TRUCK Old treasures take on a new life at estate sales CAN YOU SPOT A FAKE How to identify the true blue designer bags from the phonies CAVE MAN A Bordentown shop showcases all things quirky GOOD STUFF REALLY CHEAP Wanna see the prices of our well dressed mannequin above Read about those deals and see more in our Good Stuff Cheap slideshow There are no photos with those IDs or post 48584 does not have any attached images Read more Style Shopping articles By submitting comments you grant permission for all or part of those comments to appear in the print edition of New Jersey Monthly 7 Songs to Comfort Christie on His Failed Presidential Bid Podcast Why We re Called The Garden State Table Hopping Jersey Shore Restaurant Week Melange in Somerville A Dress For Every Occasion NJ Father and Son s Wines Win Big 7 Dining Trends to Watch in 2016 February 2016 Best New Restaurants Table of Contents Subscribe Give a Gift Locate a Newsstand Purchase back issues View older issues Paper Mill Playhouse presents A Bronx Tale Millburn Feb 04 Mar 06 Frozen in Ice at Skylands Stadium Augusta Feb 05 Feb 28 The Beach Boys Morristown Feb 10 SOMA Film Festival South Orange Feb 12 Feb 14 Marc Anthony Concierto del Día de San Valentín Newark Feb

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/style-shopping/good-stuff-cheap-the-best-bargains-in-nj/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Great Lakes: Where to Make a Splash in NJ
    or small sailboat You can drop a line for a variety of fish including pickerel sunfish catfish and largemouth bass Canoe and kayak rentals are available at Adams Canoe Rental 1005 Atsion Road Shamong Daily admission to the recreation area is 5 per car 10 for out of state guests and the facility has showers changing rooms and a well stocked concession stand For a longer stay Atsion s shores are dotted with nine state owned log cabins and 50 campsites available for 20 per night 25 for non New Jerseyans Cabins accommodate up to eight people and start at 55 per night During the summer rentals must be booked for a minimum of seven nights and often fill up a year in advance Nick DiUlio Lake Carnegie Princeton Mercer County 609 688 2054 in 1886 Princeton s crew team disbanded rather than keep fighting ships and barges for space on the narrow Delaware Raritan Canal Sixteen years later one of its members who had painted Andrew Carnegie s portrait convinced the steel titan to donate 118 000 to construct a dam in the heart of Princeton It produced a 3 ½ mile long body of water that the crew since 1906 has called home Today 800 foot wide Lake Carnegie is owned by the university but is open to all for canoeing kayaking sailing fishing and this past winter for the first time since 2009 ice skating Drew Anne Scarantino Recommended Reading Net Gains The History of Pound Fishing Lake Hopatcong Morris and Sussex counties The 45 mile shoreline of the state s largest lake was once peppered with amusement parks waterfront hotels and dance halls These days the lake is mainly residential and rocks to the buzz of motorboats and jet skis and the chatter of waterfront diners If you re not a resident you can enjoy the lake by visiting Hopatcong State Park which provides beach access picnic areas concessions restrooms boat launch and playground Daily admission from Memorial Day weekend to Labor Day is 6 on weekdays 10 on weekends Boats can be rented at private marinas around the lake try Barnes Brothers Marine Mt Arlington 973 398 0251 or Beebe Marina Lake Hopatcong 973 663 4111 If you work up an appetite you can dock at several popular restaurants Check out our Waterfront Dining Guide Christina Colizza Hospitality Creek Campground Swim Club 117 Coles Mill Road Williamstown Gloucester County 856 629 5140 Since 1961 Hospitality Creek has provided a multifaceted experience for South Jersey families boasting a 30 acre lake a wide sandy beach an Olympic sized pool boat rentals and concession stands Visitors can reserve one of Hospitality s campsites for 55 a night 330 for the week or opt for a seasonal club membership May 25 through September 2 which costs 200 per person for weekday access and 300 per person for seven day access ND You are on page 1 of 4 of this article 1 2 3 4 Continue Click to

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/great-lakes-where-to-make-a-splash-in-nj/ (2016-02-11)
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  • The Top 40 Public Golf Courses In New Jersey
    Public Golf Courses We convened a panel of experts and asked them to identify the state s 40 best daily fee and publicly owned courses Here s why these 10 topped the list The Top Golf Courses Category Leaders Our rankings for the most scenic courses most creatively designed courses the best conditioned courses and more The Top Golf Holes In New Jersey Our round up of the top golf holes in the state Value Golf Good Deals on Great Rounds Just as good golfers use strategy to reduce their strokes per hole smart golfers do the same to lower the sport s high cost Galloping Hill s New Giddyap Losing money on golf Union County bet 17 6 million on a bold plan to turn its decaying 1928 flagship into a state of the art facility And pulled it off Top Golf Methodology Top Golf Panel of Experts There are no photos with those IDs or post 53743 does not have any attached images Read more Jersey Living Outdoors Sports articles By submitting comments you grant permission for all or part of those comments to appear in the print edition of New Jersey Monthly 7 Songs to Comfort Christie on His Failed Presidential Bid Podcast Why We re Called The Garden State Table Hopping Jersey Shore Restaurant Week Melange in Somerville A Dress For Every Occasion NJ Father and Son s Wines Win Big 7 Dining Trends to Watch in 2016 February 2016 Best New Restaurants Table of Contents Subscribe Give a Gift Locate a Newsstand Purchase back issues View older issues Paper Mill Playhouse presents A Bronx Tale Millburn Feb 04 Mar 06 Frozen in Ice at Skylands Stadium Augusta Feb 05 Feb 28 The Beach Boys Morristown Feb 10 SOMA Film Festival South Orange Feb 12 Feb

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/the-top-40-public-golf-courses-2013/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Outdoors Archives - New Jersey Monthly
    Here s how to mingle with the fluffy herds Read More When Faced With a Bear October 5 2015 Advice for encountering wildlife in the wilderness Read More 24 Fantastic Festivals to Make You Fall for Fall October 2 2015 Wine tasting pumpkin picking craft shows cranberry bogs are just some of the fun activities to be enjoyed at these October festivals Read More Top of the World Hiking the Appalachian Trail October 1 2015 These four short Appalachian Trail hikes will go a long way toward helping you connect with nature and some great foliage views Read More 6 Places To See Sunday s Rare Supermoon Eclipse September 25 2015 Make sure to catch a glimpse of this rare event it won t happen again for 18 years Read More Get Lost in Wonderland Garden September 16 2015 The Federal Twist garden will be open to the public on October 10 as part of the Garden Conservancy s Open Days Read More Walk on the Wild Side at New Jersey s WILD Outdoor Expo September 11 2015 This free event celebrates New Jersey s natural resources and diverse outdoor heritage with activities for all Read More At the Barclays A Little Luck and a Lot of Birdies August 31 2015 The Barclays held at Plainfield Country Club in Edison saw plenty of exciting play But one gutsy shot may have been the most thrilling moment of the day Read More Zayat at the Haskell I Was Extremely Nervous August 25 2015 American Pharoah s owner ponders at least two more runs for his champion Read More Long on Limas LaRosa Farm and Greenhouses New Jersey is the proud home of the largest pole lima bean grower in the country Read More The One Thing You Must Do in Every NJ County August 7 2015 The Garden State is jam packed with fun things to do We ve picked something special in every county from North to South Read More Sailing Survivors Ancient A Cats July 27 2015 Relics of the 1920s single masted A Cats still skim the waters of Barnegat Bay Read More Unwanted Guests Invasive Species Infiltrate the Garden State July 14 2015 A plague of invasive plants animals and creepy crawly things is crowding out Jersey s natural species Despite efforts the exotic invaders keep coming Read More Making Bamboo Taboo A frustrated homeowner takes her beef about unwanted vegetation to Trenton Read More Page 1 of 9 1 2 3 4 5 Last 7 Songs to Comfort Christie on His Failed Presidential Bid Podcast Why We re Called The Garden State Table Hopping Jersey Shore Restaurant Week Melange in Somerville A Dress For Every Occasion NJ Father and Son s Wines Win Big 7 Dining Trends to Watch in 2016 February 2016 Best New Restaurants Table of Contents Subscribe Give a Gift Locate a Newsstand Purchase back issues View older issues Paper Mill Playhouse presents A Bronx Tale Millburn Feb 04 Mar 06 Frozen in

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/category/jersey-living/outdoors/ (2016-02-11)
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  • 4 Short But Sweet Appalachian Trail Hikes
    left This route was created in the 1960s when the Army Corps of Engineers bored out core samples as part of the groundwork for the planned Tocks Island Dam which was to be constructed across the Delaware River The dam was never built and the Delaware remains the only free flowing river in the East but these fascinating core samples are still lying on the forest floor Our route will not pass them but ambitious hikers can use a guidebook to find the samples In a few minutes turn right and ascend the orange trail again After 45 minutes as you reach the summit Sunfish Pond appears straight ahead perched atop the ridge Turn right on the AT and follow a rocky section around the shore of the mile long pond Recommended Reading Red Ripe and Ready The New Jersey Tomato Man made rock cairns and sculptures adorn the wide rocky beach tempting you to build your own A spring gurgles through the rocks on the trail These lands are within Worthington State Forest named after C C Worthington a 19th century industrialist who once owned all 8 000 acres contained within the park Leaving the pond area a woods road takes you down the ridge past a swampy pond and a recent fire scar Follow the blue blazed Douglas Trail for another 2 5 miles to Old Mine Road Follow the stone road then take the right fork where the blue and green trails converge When the trail splits continue on the blue trail to the parking lot Getting There I 80 west to Exit 1 onto Old Mine Road Follow the road to the Douglas Parking Area located at the north side of Worthington Campground Sunrise Mountain Pavilion to Culvers Gap Fire Tower 3 5 miles Each way Easy to Moderate A highlight of this hike is Sunrise Mountain Pavilion one of the state s best areas for watching eagles hawks kestrels falcons vultures and other raptors soar and glide as they head south during the fall migration In North America birds migrate in north south routes called flyways this particular spot on the Kittatinny Ridge is on the Atlantic Flyway Volunteers are out during the migration season late August to early November monitoring and recording the passing raptors Their counts assist scientists in studying migration patterns Up to 18 000 raptors have been spotted in a single day After a short walk from the parking lot to the AT you ll reach the ridge and Sunrise Mountain Pavilion Here you ll find bird lovers and New Jersey Audubon staffers with their spotting scopes who can help you identify each species The raptors ride the updrafts along the ridge the best places to see them are along the ridgetop The birds are often lower in the sky and easier to observe in the morning when the ridge is heating up from the sun The ridgeline trail is considerably rocky and the slick fallen leaves add to the challenge

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/top-of-the-world-hiking-the-appalachian-trail/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Exploring Offbeat Princeton
    with fall themed family activities and live music Barbecued chicken pork sandwiches and all the trimmings are on offer along with Terhune apple cider which can be enjoyed hot or cold and with cider doughnuts Among the activities many of which are included in the 5 admission are corn stalk and hay bale mazes wagon rides pumpkin and face painting and hobnobbing with the farm s barnyard animals Children under 3 free If homestead cheeses are high on your list it s hard to beat those produced at Cherry Grove Farm one minute south of Glencairn on 206 Its market is stocked not only with cheeses such as Buttercup Brie and Lawrenceville Jack all made with milk from the farm s cows but also its meat poultry and eggs Visitors can learn to make their own ricotta and mozzarella Check the website for class dates On October 24 Rachel Weston author of New Jersey Fresh Four Seasons from Farm to Table will teach a class on paté and pickles Recommended Reading Court Street School Fortified Students for Anything Ready for something truly offbeat The Princeton Tour Company s Ghost Tours which are offered on Saturdays in October explore campus and surrounding neighborhood spots where apparitions or paranormal activity have been reported They re led by expert ghost hunters who provide dowsing rods night vision flashlights electromagnetic field meters and thermometers The hunts which end with a tour of the Princeton Cemetery typically sell out a week in advance Entering Princeton from Route 1 and Alexander Road you ll pass a more down to earth attraction the Princeton segment of the D R Canal State Park The canal towpath on this 6 mile stretch is well trod by local walkers runners and bicyclists It s accessible from the parking lot at Turning Basin Park which also features picnic facilities and a playground Princeton Canoe and Kayak Rentals is directly across the road Saturday Sunday and holidays from September 8 through November 8 For offbeat eating consider the Ivy Inn Princeton s version of a dive bar where you can order fresh casual eats at bargain prices for Princeton that is Or try Café Vienna which offers the beverages and sweet treats of a Viennese kaffeehaus for breakfast lunch and afternoon jause along with American style eggs and sandwiches Proprietor Anita Waldenberger uses many of her Austrian family s traditional recipes for her Sacher torte and apple strudel The most unusual place for breakfast lunch or midday snack is the self service Genomics Café a soaring futuristic atrium space and one of seven eateries on the campus open to the public In its midst is a sculpture by Frank Gehry that serves as a meeting room for the lab s scientists Click to enlarge images The D R Canal parallels the Millstone River and is ideal for canoeing and kayaking The Inn at Glencairn awaits fall visitors A crested rooster flaunts its fancy feathers at Cherry Grove Farm A couple enjoys the

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/offbeat-princeton-exploring-road-less-traveled/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Sailing Survivors: Ancient A Cats
    strong breeze The skipper steers the boat with a long tiller fighting to keep it close to the wind The mainsheet tender typically a sailor of great physical strength controls the boat s long boom and huge sail without the help of the mechanical winches common on other racing boats The remainder of the crew needs to be agile leaning hard over the rail when the boat heels and moving swiftly in the front of the mast when the boat tacks The A Cat era started in 1922 when Charles McKeehan a Philadelphia judge who summered at the Jersey Shore commissioned yacht designer Charles D Mower to build a boat to compete in the prestigious Toms River Challenge Cup The prize a majestic silver mug from Tiffany presented by the Toms River Yacht Club since 1871 Recommended Reading Red Ripe and Ready The New Jersey Tomato Mower designed a new breed of catboat with a low stance for stability a shallow draft and a deep centerboard suitable for local waters Built by the Morton Johnson boatyard in Bay Head it had a modern Marconi sailing rig that was more efficient than the older Gaff rigs common on working boats McKeehan named the boat Mary Ann after his mother In her first season Mary Ann fulfilled McKeehan s dream of winning the cherished cup Sadly the A Cats almost disappeared in the late 1970s Four of the original seven remained but were literally falling apart At that point two men stepped forward to keep the A Cats from passing into the history books explains Chip Hillyer the fleet s current captain Hillyer organizes A Cat events during the racing season Nelson Hartranft a retired businessman from Ocean Gate purchased the four boats before they were scrapped Working with local boatbuilders Hartranft restored the A Cats to sailing condition and sold them to skippers who were dedicated to racing Incredibly the original plans were discovered by a boatyard worker in a Toms River antique shop That enabled Hartranft to build a new A Cat the first in 60 years Hartranft s new boat which he dubbed Wasp was constructed by master boatbuilder Lally Beaton at David Beaton Son boatyard in Brick Five more A Cats were built and sold in the 1990s by Peter Kellogg a retired Wall Street trader who summers in Bay Head Kellogg owned the A Cat Lotus as a teenager in the 1930s Several more were constructed in New Jersey in 2001 and 2002 at a cost of about 250 000 The A Cats race nearly 30 times a season a huge time commitment for all involved competing for series honors as well as historic yacht club trophies many named for famous Barnegat Bay mariners But more than the victories the skippers savor the tradition We don t want to see these A Cats disappear says Stewart You can see the A Cats for yourself from River Avenue in Toms River near the Island Heights Yacht Club 65

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/sailing-survivors-ancient-a-cats-boats/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Unwanted Guests: Invasive Species Infiltrate the Garden State
    disappear were little known groups like the Billboard Policy Procedure and Review Task Force and the Governor s Study Group on the Bicentennial of the Polish Constitution The Invasive Species Council also got the axe But Van Clef s work did not go to waste With the Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space where he is stewardship director as a base and with help from other local organizations most notably the Raritan Headwaters Association he already had created the strike team That effort brings together volunteers to collect data monitor hot spots and provide arms and legs for eradication efforts In 2008 the strike team helped the New Jersey Conservation Foundation clean up a 50 acre parcel of land in Hunterdon County that contained about 10 ponds on a former commercial fish hatchery Great Swamp Invasives Strike Team volunteer Linda Jerdach goes after a young Callery pear tree with a large lopping tool Photo by Fred Conrad Tim Morris the foundation s director of stewardship recalls that about a year after the foundation purchased the hatchery land a fisherman caught a bighead carp in one of the ponds whose waters empty into the Delaware River That was bad news The bighead which in rare instances can grow to 100 pounds is known to outcompete native species Morris asked Van Clef to help get rid of the carp As they killed off the fish with rotenone a natural poison made from the roots of tropical plants they noticed clam like mollusks neither had ever seen Van Clef reached out to his network and eventually the shell was identified as the Chinese pond mussel an invasive species that had spread over Europe but had not been documented in North America The state strike team now has a grant to eradicate the mussels and monitor the ponds to ensure that none escape This very much echoes the whole philosophy of the strike team says Morris You quickly identify species that are invasive and going to cause problems and you deal with them before they spread Right now it would be impossible to go to the Mississippi River and get rid of bighead carp But by doing it back then we don t have a problem in the Delaware Recommended Reading Court Street School Fortified Students for Anything The strike team s phone app is based on a design developed at the University of Georgia a leader in the field Users can bring up the long list of invasives by name accompanied by identifying photographs Then with a touch they can send the strike team a report of what they found and where The team collects data from all over the state and using a kind of biological triage determines where best to deploy volunteers Invasives are listed in four categories from 0 which means fewer than 10 of a given species have been reported to 3 when up to 999 have been identified When a plant is all but uncontrollable it is considered widespread That s when I say uncle Van Clef told more than 100 volunteers who gathered at Duke Farms in Hillsborough in early April for an annual conference on invasives Van Clef later made clear to the volunteers that the most important weapon in this war is information The worst enemies may be people who don t know the harm in what they are planting That s why besides the smartphone app the team s website contains an exhaustive Do Not Plant list and lists native alternatives It warns that an excess of deer can wipe out native plants leaving the door wide open for harmful non natives Illustration by Golden Cosmos Until the state adopts a more aggressive stance such efforts are about all that blocks the way of the invaders But in the last year the New Jersey Legislature has finally gotten involved though its primary target is running bamboo which while not a threat to forests and natural areas Van Clef says can be an outright aggravation between neighbors Still it is running bamboo that has caught the Legislature s attention mostly in response to a complaint from an Atlantic County nurse who bought a home last year without realizing that her neighbor s bamboo grove was migrating into her yard Desperate for help the homeowner reached out to her local assemblyman Vincent Mazzeo D Northfield This running bamboo once it goes it goes says Mazzeo You can t do anything about it Mazzeo introduced a bill A 3452 that would impose fines on real estate agents who do not disclose the presence of bamboo to potential home buyers The final version of the bill passed by the Assembly last December dropped that clause but added a requirement that sellers disclose the presence of bamboo on their property The bill also kept a controversial 100 fine for anyone who plants bamboo within 100 feet of a property line Seventeen assemblymen voted against the bill One of them Michael Patrick Carroll R Morris Plains says he opposed the bill not because he thought it was a bad idea but because it effectively criminalizes unknowing behavior If you just happen to own a plant suddenly you re a criminal Carroll asks He acknowledges that there s room for a law controlling invasive species but not this law As the bamboo bills awaits action in the state Senate a more aggressive invasive species bill A 3125 is stalled in the Assembly It would prohibit the sale or planting of nine invasive species including purple loosestrife and Japanese stiltgrass However the bill excludes Japanese barberry and many other invasive species that are being grown and sold in the state Despite those limitations environmentalists are optimistic that Trenton is finally moving in the right direction We look at it as a first step says Megan Tinsley conservation advocate for the New Jersey Audubon Society Tinsley says one reason New Jersey has fallen behind other states is because the landscape nursery industry has

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/unwanted-guests-invasive-species-infiltrate-garden-state/ (2016-02-11)
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