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  • The Evolution Of Newark Airport Over The Years
    years earlier on 68 acres of reclaimed swampland along the Passaic River The first major commercial airport in the New York metro area and the first anywhere with a paved runway Newark was the busiest such facility in the world during its first decade Corbis NOW The serpentine lines at today s TSA security checkpoints left have made trips through Newark Liberty International Airport anything but simple That s true of airports everywhere in the post 9 11 era but Newark s busy terminals have made air travel particularly frustrating In 2011 the airport clocked 410 013 flights ushering 33 711 372 passengers through its gates That s an awful lot of travelers shuffling around in their socks Read more Historic Jersey Jersey Living articles By submitting comments you grant permission for all or part of those comments to appear in the print edition of New Jersey Monthly 7 Songs to Comfort Christie on His Failed Presidential Bid Podcast Why We re Called The Garden State Table Hopping Jersey Shore Restaurant Week Melange in Somerville A Dress For Every Occasion NJ Father and Son s Wines Win Big 7 Dining Trends to Watch in 2016 February 2016 Best New Restaurants Table of Contents Subscribe Give a Gift Locate a Newsstand Purchase back issues View older issues Paper Mill Playhouse presents A Bronx Tale Millburn Feb 04 Mar 06 Frozen in Ice at Skylands Stadium Augusta Feb 05 Feb 28 The Beach Boys Morristown Feb 10 SOMA Film Festival South Orange Feb 12 Feb 14 Marc Anthony Concierto del Día de San Valentín Newark Feb 13 Sign up for our FREE newsletters Weekend Buzz Events in NJ Side Dish Dining news Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Instagram Follow us on Pinterest Subscribe Purchase Subscribe Manage

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/hurry-up-and-wait-newark-airport/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Bound Brook Adapts Its Infrastructure To Deal With Persistent Flooding
    Rahway River crested at its highest known level 42 13 feet during the onslaught of Hurricane Floyd Again a devastating fire erupted at a local business but was contained thanks to the heroic efforts of the Bound Brook Fire Department and other companies Ed Murray The Star Ledger NOW Although a flood protection project has been under way for several years the southern end of modern Bound Brook pop 10 402 was swamped in 2007 during a nor easter and in 2011 by Hurricane Irene The 130 million flood protection project which involves a series of levees flood walls closure gates and pump systems is due for completion in the coming months Hurricane Irene served as a test run for the massive undertaking While the results weren t perfect says Bound Brook Mayor Carey Pilato we only had 1 to 3 feet That s a major improvement Read more Historic Jersey Jersey Living articles By submitting comments you grant permission for all or part of those comments to appear in the print edition of New Jersey Monthly 7 Songs to Comfort Christie on His Failed Presidential Bid Podcast Why We re Called The Garden State Table Hopping Jersey Shore Restaurant Week Melange in Somerville A Dress For Every Occasion NJ Father and Son s Wines Win Big 7 Dining Trends to Watch in 2016 February 2016 Best New Restaurants Table of Contents Subscribe Give a Gift Locate a Newsstand Purchase back issues View older issues Paper Mill Playhouse presents A Bronx Tale Millburn Feb 04 Mar 06 Frozen in Ice at Skylands Stadium Augusta Feb 05 Feb 28 The Beach Boys Morristown Feb 10 SOMA Film Festival South Orange Feb 12 Feb 14 Marc Anthony Concierto del Día de San Valentín Newark Feb 13 Sign up for our FREE newsletters

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/bound-to-flood-bound-brook-deluge/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Camden's TV Mastery Changed the World
    by 1939 RCA demonstrated television to the press broadcasting from the company s pavilion at the World s Fair in Queens as a cadre of reporters watched in awe at the RCA building in Rockefeller Center RCA s Camden operations had grown up along the Delaware River on the site of the old Victor Talking Machine Company which RCA acquired in 1929 The Victor Company an early phonograph manufacturer recorded the likes of Enrico Caruso and Jelly Roll Morton in its Camden studio and introduced the U S to the classic Nipper logo of a fox terrier listening to His Master s Voice that would eventually be associated with RCA By the late 1930s RCA was a leading manufacturer of radios and phonographs and was gearing up for televisions but the outbreak of World War II meant a switch to defense manufacturing At the war s end RCA shifted back to consumer electronics and from 1946 to 1952 the bulk of TVs manufactured in America were made by RCA in Camden That era ended in the mid 50s after RCA moved TV production to a new plant in Indiana In 1984 RCA began breaking up its Camden campus Today only three of the 30 RCA buildings remain A stained glass Nipper still listens for his master s voice atop one of those buildings There are no photos with those IDs or post 123030 does not have any attached images Read more Historic Jersey Jersey Living articles By submitting comments you grant permission for all or part of those comments to appear in the print edition of New Jersey Monthly 7 Songs to Comfort Christie on His Failed Presidential Bid Podcast Why We re Called The Garden State Table Hopping Jersey Shore Restaurant Week Melange in Somerville A Dress For Every

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/camdens-tv-mastery/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Jammin' in Jersey, Where Jazz Once Reigned
    like the Picadilly in 1946 and more than 10 years later at Sugar Hill on Broad Street Charlie Parker who recorded for Newark based Savoy Records and John Coltrane performed and hung out in places like Lloyd s Manor They were huge influences on the younger players says Kukla Among those younger players was Kenneth Gibson the future Newark mayor who played sax in a band with Shorter Another vibrant scene heated up in the 1930s and 40s in Asbury Park where dozens of nightclubs lined Springwood Avenue the main drag through the city s predominantly African American West Side The clubs attracted local talent like Red Bank born Count Basie who according to jazz historian Charlie Horner played the Smile Awhile Inn and other joints as a teenager Meanwhile big name artists like Ellington and Ella Fitzgerald played to mostly white crowds at Convention Hall and the Casino on the Asbury Park boardwalk often slipping over to the West Side for late night jam sessions Recommended Reading Red Ripe and Ready The New Jersey Tomato Jazz spilled into Camden and other urban areas as well as popular suburban venues like the Meadowbrook in Cedar Grove The state s jazz legacy continues today with resident artists like Christian McBride Geri Allen Nat Adderley and Dave Stryker as well as vital jazz institutions such as Newark based radio station WBGO NJPAC s annual James Moody Jazz Festival the Institute of Jazz Studies at Rutgers Newark and the education foundation Jazz House Kids There are no photos with those IDs or post 123062 does not have any attached images Read more Historic Jersey Jersey Living articles By submitting comments you grant permission for all or part of those comments to appear in the print edition of New Jersey Monthly 7 Songs to

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/jammin-in-jersey-jazz-once-reigned/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Listening to the Cosmos
    first time it occurred to Wilson that maybe people are really taking this cosmology seriously and I d better learn something about it Back then cosmology the study of the origin and development of the universe was in its infancy It had never really explained or measured anything Wilson says His and Penzias s discovery of the CMB changed that Since then he adds cosmology has really grown into a full science with very precise measurements it s just entirely different now Accordingly our concept of the cosmos is entirely different as well The existence of the CMB effectively dealt a death blow to the Steady State camp Today virtually all scientists accept the Big Bang theory the idea that the universe had a discrete beginning some 13 8 billion years ago one of the precise measurements Wilson refers to in the form of an infinitesimally small bundle of immense energy that exploded and has continued to expand ever since Recommended Reading On the Frontline in the Fight Against Cyberterrorism The Nobel Prize confirmed the importance of Wilson and Penzias s discovery But its influence has spread far and wide like the CMB itself Without it an MIT physicist named Alan Guth would never have proposed his 1980 theory of cosmic inflation the idea that just after the Big Bang energy and space itself expanded from virtually nothing to the size of a pebble an inflation of truly mind boggling proportions and has continued to expand though at a slower rate ever since Then there is the Princeton born kid named John Kovac who while attending high school in Florida read about the CMB and deciding it was the coolest thing in all of science applied to Princeton University to study it Earlier this year Kovac travelled to the South Pole where working inside a massive microwave telescope known as BICEP2 he searched for and apparently found a pattern of polarized light lodged within the CMB This turned out to be evidence of Guth s proposed cosmic inflation Kovac s findings still have to be confirmed and replicated before being accepted as definitive Like Penzias and Wilson s discovery Kovac s if confirmed will sweep aside many streams of thought currently competing to explain cosmic inflation It s also likely to shake up our deepest sense of the universe a sense that there is just one Kovac s findings align with a theory called chaotic inflation which supports the existence of a multiverse filled with many smaller pocket universes including our own each conceivably governed by its own unique laws of physics Scientists have suggested that the multiverse itself as well as the number of universes within it could be infinite giving rise to the possibility that different versions of the planet Earth and of ourselves could exist across the vastness of cosmic space and time Coming exactly a half century after Wilson and Penzias were bothered by that persistent hiss Kovac s discovery has evinced the kind of superlatives

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/listening-to-the-cosmos/ (2016-02-11)
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  • The Blast That Rocked NJ
    plant s new solvent recovery building A tank containing 16 000 pounds of smokeless powder ignited triggering explosions throughout the campus Ultimately 296 550 pounds of powder burst into flame leveling 20 buildings killing 51 workers and injuring 200 others The explosion registered on a seismograph at Fordham University in the Bronx and was felt 90 miles away in Poughkeepsie Throughout the tristate area windows shattered and buildings shook Nearby the force of the explosion launched people through the air Harry F Pascoe a local who later published a history of the plant titled The Powder Monkey lived two miles from the disaster site His family was enjoying lunch at the time of the blast his father was scheduled to work the 3 to 11 pm shift The screen door suddenly opened and I looked up to see who was coming Pascoe writes All I can remember is being under the kitchen table Our house had sustained severe damage my mother was crying and her arm was bleeding Recommended Reading Court Street School Fortified Students for Anything Despite orders from the State Police 10 000 people rushed to watch the plant burn and offer help Bodies were laid on the front lawn of the overwhelmed Dover General Hospital There were craters as deep as 13 feet where the buildings once stood Today a memorial in Horseshoe Lake Park in Roxbury honors the victims of the worst explosives plant disaster in United States history There are no photos with those IDs or post 114975 does not have any attached images Read more Historic Jersey articles By submitting comments you grant permission for all or part of those comments to appear in the print edition of New Jersey Monthly 7 Songs to Comfort Christie on His Failed Presidential Bid Podcast Why We

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/historic-jersey/the-blast-that-rocked-nj/ (2016-02-11)
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  • High Above the Hudson at Palisades Park
    and when you were on it you felt like you were much higher than you really were because you were also looking down another 200 feet to the river says Vince Gargiulo 63 the founder and executive director of the Palisades Amusement Park Historical Society and author of a book about the park But my favorite spot was the entrance on Palisades Avenue because you knew everything was going to start from there The site opened in 1898 as a trolley park to encourage people to use the trolley on weekends it included a park with rides an athletic field and a Hudson River view It soon grew into a permanent carnival that rivaled Coney Island Dirigible flights Wild West shows Italian operettas Siamese twins two headed cows the tunnel of love high diving horses french fries doused with malt vinegar radio broadcasts by Cousin Bruce Morrow a stage where acts from Xavier Cugat to Diana Ross performed it was all there on 38 acres bristling with an ever shifting array of entertainment Recommended Reading Net Gains The History of Pound Fishing It got so popular there was no way that little two town area could support that many vehicles coming in says Gargiulo who often walked the 15 blocks from his Cliffside Park home to Palisades as a boy I remember the traffic jams and I remember my father coming up with new curse words when he was trying to get from one end of town to the other At its peak the park hosted more than 100 000 people a day It was an especially electric sight from across the river at night the lights twinkling dreamlike atop the cliffs That was his inspiration Gargiulo says about Chuck Barris who was a young ABC television employee not yet the producer of The Dating Game or The Gong Show when he glanced across the Hudson and heard a tune in his head He saw the amusement park across the river and he started writing the song In 1962 Barris s tune Palisades Park was a number 3 hit for Freddy Boom Boom Cannon But by 1972 the saltwater pool was dry and the Cyclone roller coaster was a pile of timber The land was rezoned the park replaced by a cluster of condominium towers A small monument stands as a memory Here we were happy declares the bronze plaque affixed to a boulder here we grew There are no photos with those IDs or post 123129 does not have any attached images Read more Historic Jersey Jersey Living articles By submitting comments you grant permission for all or part of those comments to appear in the print edition of New Jersey Monthly 7 Songs to Comfort Christie on His Failed Presidential Bid Podcast Why We re Called The Garden State Table Hopping Jersey Shore Restaurant Week Melange in Somerville A Dress For Every Occasion NJ Father and Son s Wines Win Big 7 Dining Trends to Watch in 2016

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/high-above-the-hudson-at-palisades-amusement-park/ (2016-02-11)
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  • 14 Stops Along the Sinatra Walking Tour
    served as captain Today it s a private residence Grace Scianalepore shows off the jukebox at Leo s Grandevous Guess whose songs are in heavy rotation Photo by Ken Schlager Leo s Grandevous I continue south on Grand to Second Street and step inside Leo s Grandevous 200 Grand Street a spacious Italian restaurant and bar owned by Nick DePalma grandson of the original proprietor Leo DiTerlizzi and Leo s wife Tessie On this day DePalma s sister lifelong Hoboken resident Grace Scianalepore is managing the bar She explains that Leo s was originally a pool hall Leo and Tessie lived upstairs where Tessie would prepare her Italian specialties as a treat for the pool shooting patrons Among the late night clientele the young Sinatra just starting to make his name in Jersey clubs like the Rustic Tavern Recommended Reading Court Street School Fortified Students for Anything My grandmother used to bring down mussels for the guys says Scianalepore Sinatra would drop in for a quick drink on his way home from a show DiTerlizzi became a huge Sinatra fan and with his brothers amassed a collection of Sinatra memorabilia that still blankets the restaurant s walls Photo by Ken Schlager Piccolo s Leaving Leo s I walk two blocks to Piccolo s 92 Clinton Street a pizza and cheesesteak joint and home to more Sinatra memorabilia Here I encounter James Espinosa a 55 year old retired plumber who eagerly relates his experience shining Sinatra s shoes Don t dirty my socks Sinatra directed the young Espinosa For a job well done he gave Espinosa a 5 tip Not bad for a quarter shine Photo by Ken Schlager Demarest High School From Piccolo s it s a six block walk to Demarest High School Fourth and Garden streets The massive building looms majestically over Church Square Park But it must not have impressed the young Sinatra accused of a prank he was expelled after 47 days Lucille Burke dishes out treats and Sinatra stories at Lepore s Photo by Ken Schlager Lepore s Home Made Chocolates Near the high school stands the new location of Lepore s Home Made Chocolates 105 Fourth Street In the 1980s the superstar Sinatra would stop at the old location at Sixth and Garden when visiting his godfather to indulge in a favorite treat chocolate covered dried apricots Mario Lepore who founded the business 35 years ago tells me Sinatra would send his limo driver into the shop to purchase the apricots by the trayful Whatever I had he took Behind the counter Lucille Burke volunteers that she was born two doors down from Sinatra at 413 Monroe Burke is too young to have encountered Sinatra but she recalls stories of him singing on the street to anyone who would listen He d grab anything a stick a twig and sing into it like it was a microphone Eager to share more stories Burke opens her flip phone and calls her older brother Anthony Bencibenga

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/people/in-franks-footsteps-sinatra-walking-tour/ (2016-02-11)
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