archive-com.com » COM » N » NJMONTHLY.COM

Total: 1172

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Appealing Apples: The History of Ralston Cider Mill
    the 20th century the mill was again dormant In time the roof collapsed the upper floors rotted out and the apple presses crashed down two stories to the basement Still there were offers for the property all of which the Fornaros turned down Finally in 2003 at the urging of the Historic Preservation Committee the Fornaros sold the mill to the township for close to 1 million with the stipulation that it be preserved as a museum Restoration began in 2004 with most of the contractors working pro bono and generous donors pitching in The renovation salvaged much of the its vintage hardware including the gears pulleys and presses which are now hooked up to an electric motor that mimics the water driven system Recommended Reading Red Ripe and Ready The New Jersey Tomato Today the privately funded not for profit museum is staffed entirely by volunteers School groups and scout troops tour the mill learning about its history the science behind waterpower and how to press an apple themselves by hand And once a year the Ralston Cider Mill dusts off the old machinery and runs the old apple presses This year s pressing will take place October 10 It s on this special day that Sammy and Raymond break out a bottle of applejack saved years earlier by Sammy s father Judging by the decaying label it s probably close to 100 years old The two men don t seem to mind They sip the precious liquid from shot glasses oblivious to the crowd of bees the applejack is attracting Outside the mill volunteers unload a truck full of apples donated by Alstede Farms in nearby Chester and feed them onto a conveyer belt that shimmies the fruit up to the mill s third floor The apples represent a mix of varieties In order to have the best tasting cider explains Alstede general manager Kurt Alstede you want to have a mixture of apples that are both sweet and tart That way you get a complex flavor with a little sharp apple bite but still sweet Once inside the apples core seeds and all are chopped into a slop called pomace by a grater whose sharp blades spin at 2 000 rpm The mill is a maze of gears chains pulleys and presses working in synchronization On a crowded balcony children peek their heads through the wooden banisters to watch the action Behind them parents and grandparents lean over the handrails cameras at the ready The crowd listens attentively to Nadaskay s narration punctuated by the gentle squeak of pulleys The atmosphere is relaxed but electric as the crowd gasps in excitement when the pomace drops from a chute above The mixture lands with a juicy splat in a framed wooden hopper about 4 feet square 6 inches deep and lined with cloth Working with wooden rakes volunteers spread the pomace evenly around the rack The excess cloth is folded to enclose the pomace The frame is removed

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/appealing-apples-the-history-of-ralston-cider-mill/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Freedom's Path: The Underground Railroad in NJ
    a slave hunter here lately I was told yesterday in search of a woman he tracked her to our Alms house As Abigail s letter suggests runaway slaves faced constant risk of capture no hiding place was truly safe Some however offered better concealment than others Reverend William S Hall a Quaker who owned the Cranbury Inn evidently remodeled a chimney flue at the inn into what was known as a body hiding box accessed by a trapdoor The space which was concealed behind a wall and held up to four people can be seen today by visitors to the inn Such hiding places were cramped and the occupants were completely dependent on their hosts for the most basic necessities Imagine what it was like to have given up your total physical well being to a stranger and have to wait for that person to provide you with something to eat and drink and tell you when it was safe to go to the bathroom says Gay Ingegneri who owns and operates the Cranbury Inn with her husband Tom Imagine how cold it must have been in winter and how hot in summer Recommended Reading Net Gains The History of Pound Fishing A trapdoor also concealed the hiding space at the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal A M E Church in Greenwich Township The secret five foot square room still exists beneath the present day altar According to Reverend Melvin Johnson the church constructed in 1838 and still serving a congregation today often was the first stop for many slaves after crossing the Delaware River They would then be sent to the next safe house along the route in Springtown One of the only known Underground Railroad stations in New Jersey owned and operated by an African American was located in the black community of Snow Hill present day Lawnside Peter Mott was born in Delaware and evidence suggests that he was a free man though he may have been born a slave Records show that in 1844 Mott purchased property in Snow Hill for 100 and built a two story home He and his wife Eliza used their home as an Underground Railroad station while Mott worked as a preacher and the first Sunday school superintendent of the Mt Pisgah A M E Church Oral tradition says Peter carried the freedom seekers in his wagon to the Friends in Haddonfield and Moorestown says Linda Shockley president of the Lawnside Historical Society When the Motts were hiding runaway slaves the women in the community would help Eliza by cooking extra food In 1992 the Lawnside Historical Society acquired and restored the Mott house opening it as a museum in 2001 Visitors can watch a film The Best Kept Secret about the house and town s history view artifacts uncovered during an on site archeological dig and examine items donated by William Still s descendants including a pocket watch opera glasses and 22 caliber Derringer pistol Tour guides dressed in period costumes

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/freedoms-path-underground-railroad-nj/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Burr-fect Together: No Musical for History's Villain
    family is rich Flash forward to the precocious Burr now 13 on his first day at the College of New Jersey the school founded by his father and later renamed Princeton University song My Daddy Was President of Princeton Huzzah 1775 Burr signs up for the Revolution He and future traitor Benedict Arnold fail to conquer Quebec Gee Maine s a Big Place to Walk Through but Burr is rewarded with a job on General Washington s staff and promptly quits Bad Decisions Hamilton later takes the position and rides it to power Burr is given command of a regiment but after losing the Battle of Monmouth he resigns his commission to study law He moves to New York marries and has a daughter Theodosia Cue sad music foreshadowing the death of Burr s wife when Theodosia is 10 Burr rises quickly assemblyman U S senator and in 1800 Thomas Jefferson s vice presidential pick Due to an oddity in the Constitution Burr almost becomes president It Shoulda Woulda Coulda Been Me until Hamilton swings the vote against him Bumped from the ticket in 1804 Burr runs for governor of New York but again Hamilton stands in his way Peeved at a remark Hamilton probably didn t make Burr challenges his rival to a duel in Weehawken Shots are exchanged and Hamilton is mortally wounded Reprise Bad Decisions Facing criminal prosecution Burr flees to Theodosia s house in South Carolina Curtain Recommended Reading Exclusive Inside Bridgegate ACT II Burr is approached by conspirators to be president if New England secedes from the Union when they find out about Hamilton s death the plan collapses Instead Burr begins raising an army to invade the Spanish territories I Hear It s Nice in Texas This Time of Year Burr is arrested stands trial for treason Reprise Bad Decisions and is acquitted Still he can t overcome this latest disgrace In New York Burr awaits a visit from Theodosia but her ship is lost at sea Pirates the Brits or Bad Luck Burr is devastated Running out of money he marries Eliza Jumel a wealthy former madam but they soon separate Reprise Woe Is I Burr suffers a stroke moves into a hotel on Staten Island Exile and dies in 1836 remembered as the man who slew Alexander Hamilton If Only I Had Known On second thought no one s going to believe this Let s make it an opera instead Those things never make sense James Nevius s most recent book Footprints in New York Lyons Press 2014 examines the shootout in Weehawken Read more Historic Jersey People articles By submitting comments you grant permission for all or part of those comments to appear in the print edition of New Jersey Monthly 7 Songs to Comfort Christie on His Failed Presidential Bid Podcast Why We re Called The Garden State Table Hopping Jersey Shore Restaurant Week Melange in Somerville A Dress For Every Occasion NJ Father and Son s Wines Win Big

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/people/burr-fect-together-no-musical-for-historys-villain/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • New Jersey's Tuskegee Airmen Fought Battles At Home, As Well As Over Europe
    family My people had no political pull Lee resigned himself to work as a technical inspector and communications chief Born Shade Meshack Lee in rural Alabama Lee was no stranger to the Jim Crow segregation laws of the Deep South Passionately committed to civil rights he and his fellow activists were irked by the segregated training facility at Tuskegee We were not all slaphappy about this he says The president of Tuskegee Institute and other Negro colleges were satisfied with a separate training entity with this token We weren t We knew we were coming to a time when we would have to integrate and we didn t want to see this setback Lee was discharged from the service following the war but reenlisted in 1948 retiring as master sergeant in 1963 He then held a variety of jobs including radar technician and computer engineer He has court records legal affidavits correspondence with political leaders and other documents attesting to his decades long struggle against discrimination in the military and elsewhere I started in 1938 and my view has been consistent since says Lee who has three children and seven grandchildren A person should be admitted to the armed forces on the basis of what he or she brings to the mission There should be no separate thing based on race religion or sexual orientation A 1937 graduate of Arts High School in Newark Charles Nolley loved acting dancing stand up comedy anything that placed him in front of an audience Show business was my life then says Nolley 95 who lives in Edison with his wife Martha Everything about it was great But Nolley s dream of a life on stage would soon be stalled when on December 7 1941 the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor propelling the United States into World War II Drafted into the army in 1943 Nolley then 26 says he also took part in the Tuskegee flight training program The Army Air Corps was a white club Nolley says It was difficult They didn t want us But finally they said Alright let the blacks in Recommended Reading Courting Danger Actress Christina Jackson Nolley too had to fight a few campaigns at home During basic training at Godman Field near Fort Knox Kentucky he staged a strike against the practice of withholding milk meat and other rations from black servicemen He was arrested but his court martial exonerated him At Godman Nolley was appalled to find prisoners of war accorded better treatment than the African American aviators We couldn t go to the movies because of our color he says We had a lot of German and Italian prisoners of war on the base and they were allowed to go sometimes with white girls That really bothered me Upon his honorable discharge on March 17 1946 Nolley who has two children and three grandchildren returned briefly to the stage He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Virginia State University and a Master s in dramatic arts from Columbia University He taught art classes at Barringer Prep in Newark and later became the school s vice principal Nolley s war mementos include an aged black and white photograph It shows the young serviceman grinning widely as he performed a comedy dance routine for his unit in an open air Army theater on August 31 1944 He doesn t recall where the photograph was taken only that it was one of many performances Clearly not even war could dampen Nolley s theatrical spirit Eager to be a pilot Private Roscoe Dabney was among thousands of African American enlisted men in the early 1940s to undergo the same rigorous academic and psychological testing that was given to white applicants Three times he took the test and three times he passed Yet he received no call to report to Tuskegee The army didn t explain why I found out later that they had restricted the number of black people entering the Army Air Corps Dabney says Finally on Christmas Eve 1943 Dabney was told to board a train for Alabama to begin aviation cadet training At that time there was a paper floating around the entire military compound at Tuskegee that said black people couldn t learn to fly airplanes because we were lazy lackadaisical and childlike And that our brain wasn t as big Dabney says referring to an Army War College AWC study that sought to perpetuate the myth that blacks were mentally inferior to whites The AWC memorandum declared among other falsehoods that the cranial cavity of the Negro is smaller than the white his brain weighing 35 ounces contrasted with 45 for the white Any blacks who showed marked mental attainments it asserted had a heavy strain of white blood It was pretty strange because here you were in Uncle Sam s airplanes doing all of these things that they said you couldn t do says Dabney who remained Stateside throughout the war He graduated from the Tuskegee program as a first lieutenant in 1945 a month after the United States forced Japan to surrender by dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki After the war Dabney flew blimps as a civilian pilot for the U S Navy Now 90 He lives in Willingboro with his wife Brenda They have two children and two grandchildren The war ended without Victor Ransom ever leaving U S soil But he and other members of the 477th Bombardment Group were busy fighting a different battle Activated in June 1944 the 477th was plagued by delays and inefficiencies due in large part to its commander a white colonel and rigid segregationist who moved the group from base to base 38 times in less than a year to try to quell dissent Fed up a group of black officers staged a quiet nonviolent protest at Freeman Field Indiana on April 5 1945 when they tried to enter a club used by white officers only Ransom who graduated from Stuyvesant

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/double-victory/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • A Dozen Kids, and a Bushel of Timeless Ideas
    downsized to the apartment in 1939 but it was the big Victorian at 68 Eagle Rock Way that served as family residence and laboratory for Frank and Lillian s experiments in time management and efficiency Partners in a consulting firm the senior Gilbreths first presented their ideas for streamlining the workplace in 1914 It wasn t hard for the Gilbreths to find guinea pigs Our house was a sort of school for scientific management and elimination of wasted motions daughter Ernestine Gilbreth Carey wrote in Cheaper by the Dozen which she co authored with her brother Frank The Gilbreths put Victrolas in their bathrooms so the children could learn a foreign language while using the facilities The children were taught to button their shirts from the bottom up to save time two seconds to be exact They learned to touch type and do chores with the precision of a Swiss watch When Frank died of a heart attack in 1924 at the Erie Lackawanna train station in Montclair Lillian was faced with the most crucial test of all how to raise 11 children aged 2 to 17 One of the children Mary had died of diphtheria Recommended Reading Courting Danger Actress Christina Jackson Lillian who had a PhD in industrial psychology began running the efficiency business on her own In the family kitchen she created a concept for a more efficient layout one still in use today Using her design a homemaker could whip up a cake put it in the oven and do the dishes with a minimum of steps In 1929 she partnered with the Brooklyn Borough Gas Company to unveil her Kitchen Practical showcasing the new gas appliances as well as her studies on motion savings Among other Gilbreth ideas still in use is a technique to teach military recruits how to rapidly disassemble and reassemble their weapons even when blindfolded Lillian Gilbreth died in 1972 at age 93 Twelve years later a postage stamp was dedicated in her honor in Montclair According to grandson Peter it was the last time the entire family was together Peter s uncle 98 year old Fred Gilbreth of Larchmont New York is Frank and Lillian s last living child He still thinks of his mother as perfect Click to enlarge images 68 Eagle Rock Way in Montclair the former home of the Gilbreth clan Read more Historic Jersey Jersey Living People articles By submitting comments you grant permission for all or part of those comments to appear in the print edition of New Jersey Monthly 7 Songs to Comfort Christie on His Failed Presidential Bid Podcast Why We re Called The Garden State Table Hopping Jersey Shore Restaurant Week Melange in Somerville A Dress For Every Occasion NJ Father and Son s Wines Win Big 7 Dining Trends to Watch in 2016 February 2016 Best New Restaurants Table of Contents Subscribe Give a Gift Locate a Newsstand Purchase back issues View older issues Paper Mill Playhouse presents A Bronx Tale

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/a-dozen-kids-gilbreth-family-montclair/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Cornelia Hancock Was Determined To Serve As A Nurse During The Civil War
    30 years of age plain looking and dressed in modest black or brown skirts She forbade skirt hoops and jewelry Dix acquired the nickname Dragon Dix because according to one description at the time she was stern and brusque Cornelia described her first encounter with Dragon Dix She looked the nurses over and pronounced them all suitable except me She immediately objected to my going farther on account of my youth and rosy cheeks Dix and another older nurse Eliza Farnham went into conference evidently to discuss whether Cornelia could somehow be admitted to the nurse corps despite her youth and good looks Cornelia made her own decision The discussion between the two women waxed warm and I have no idea what conclusion they came to for I settled the question myself by getting on the railroad car and staying in my seat until the train pulled out of the city of Baltimore They had not forcibly taken me from the train so I got into Gettysburg the night of July sixth where the need was so great that there was no further cavil about age Recommended Reading Court Street School Fortified Students for Anything The battle at Gettysburg began July 1 and ended two days later with General Robert E Lee s Confederate Army beating a bedraggled retreat to the South The casualty lists for both armies were long and horrific Lee s Army counted approximately 3 903 men killed 18 735 wounded and 5 425 missing The Union tallied 3 155 men killed 14 529 wounded and 5 365 missing Cornelia s first encounter with the overwhelming tide of suffering came at a makeshift hospital in a Gettysburg church Hundreds of desperately wounded men were stretched out on boards laid across the high backed pews as closely as they could be packed together I seemed to stand breast high in a sea of anguish She spent the next day at a field hospital containing about 500 wounded She was the only nurse present not another woman within a half mile she told a cousin in a letter written July 7 Four surgeons were busy all day amputating legs and arms Among the wounded were many Confederate soldiers known as Johnny rebels I have one tent of Johnnies in my ward but I am not obliged to give them anything but whiskey she wrote in her diary Eventually the Union Army established a large general hospital Camp Letterman outside of town where Cornelia labored until early September In a letter written soon after her arrival at Camp Letterman Cornelia advised her sister not to bother directing letters to Miss Cornelia Hancock since she was known simply as Hancock Caring for the wounded at Camp Letterman usually occupied Cornelia 10 hours a day In a letter to her mother dated August 17 she reported her displeasure with Army conventions I am alive and well doing duty still in the general hospital I do think military matters are enough to aggravate

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/gettysburgs-angel/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Witness to History: Diary of a Revolution
    deacon and a soldier in the Colonial army Condict entered in her diary the texts of sermons she heard as many as three in one day Sometimes her attention waned On July 18 1773 referring to her church s leader the Rev Jedediah Chapman she wrote Did Mr Chapman preach from these words Well I have forgot But Condict could also be prescient After documenting the great Disturbance in Boston she added What must we expect But war I think or at least fear it will be so Six months later in April 1775 Condict witnessed Training Day when troops gathered for military exercises probably around the city of Elizabeth I thought It Would Be a mournful Sight to see if they had been fighting in earnest how soon they will be Calld forth to the field of war we Cannot tell she wrote I have just Now heard Say that All hopes of Conciliation Between Briten and her Colonies are at an end for Both the king his Parliment have announced our Destruction Fleet and armies are Prepareing with utmost diligence for that Purpose Recommended Reading Court Street School Fortified Students for Anything War news soon displaced sermon titles in the diary They began to fight at Boston the regulars We hear Shot first there they killed 30 of our men she wrote on April 23 By May she described a day of Mourning when the British fleet was expected in New York Harbor The men of the community were gathering to Conclude upon measures Which may Be most Proper to be taken While her family supported the rebellion against the king the community included many loyalists West Orange s Tory Corner neighborhood was named for the loyalists who gathered there As the war dragged on Condict listed casualties of fighting and of an illness she called Camp Disorder In 1777 she recorded the names of local men taken prisoner by Loyalist troops in Elizabeth Condict s entries ended in 1779 with her marriage to cousin Aaron Harrison After giving birth to a son who died before turning 12 Condict died that same year of unknown causes She was 25 A family descendant donated the diary to the New Jersey Historical Society in Newark in 1922 Condict was buried in the Old Burying Ground in Orange A slate marker and a memorial rock mark her grave The more significant memorial is her diary Writing in it apparently helped her weather those turbulent times Sometimes after our people is gone to Bed she wrote in 1774 I get my Pen for I don t know how to Content myself without writeing Something Marcia Worth Baker is a freelance writer in South Orange There are no photos with those IDs or post 100110 does not have any attached images Read more Historic Jersey Jersey Living People articles By submitting comments you grant permission for all or part of those comments to appear in the print edition of New Jersey Monthly 7

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/witness-to-history-diary-revolution/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Eric Levin, Author at New Jersey Monthly
    many North Jerseyans of a certain age Gruning s was the greatest ice cream parlor there ever was Seen in Eat Drink Historic Jersey Jersey Living People Episode 1 Leia Gaccione on Bobby Flay January 5 2016 In this inaugural episode dining editor Eric Levin talks with chef Leia Gaccione who held top positions in several Bobby Flay restaurants before opening her terrific New American BYO South Pine in Morristown in 2015 Seen in Eating with Eric Just For the Web Podcasts A Soft Drink Rises as Soda Slides December 3 2015 Princeton s Ben Weiss used a little known coffee extract to load Bai5 his low cal fruit flavored beverage with beneficial antioxidants Seen in Eat Drink People Satirist Turns Scholar Finds Reality is Funnier October 28 2015 Josh Friedland award winning creator of the wickedly witty Ruth Bourdain tweets returns with Eatymology his dictionary of pricelessly preening new food terms Seen in Eat Drink People Peacock Inn Welcomes New Chef With Quintessa Wine Dinner October 12 2015 Jason Ramos a veteran of Stage Left and the Pluckemin Inn takes the helm of the Princeton fine dining restaurant and inn Seen in Eat Drink How Montclair Man Created Colbert s Late Show Set September 10 2015 Jim Fenhagen winner of 20 Emmys for set design talks about the biggest most scrutinized job in my career Seen in Just For the Web People Pay What You Want is OVER Blu Goes Black September 1 2015 Zod Arifai s two restaurants Blu and Next Door close exactly one week after he said he would keep them open a few more months Seen in Eat Drink Table Hopping with Rosie Page 1 of 59 1 2 3 4 5 10 20 30 Last 7 Songs to Comfort Christie on His Failed Presidential

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/authors/elevin/ (2016-02-11)
    Open archived version from archive



  •