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  • Tom Perrotta's New Novel The Leftovers Imagines Life After The Rapture-www.njmonthly.com
    out family Perrotta explores the ways people react to this mysterious and devastating occurrence Some characters join loosely formed cults some try to pick up and move on others are so distraught that they can t seem to function Perotta tells the story from multiple perspectives with the point of view often shifting from chapter to chapter The event that I chose only deepens the mysteries in people s lives Perrotta says of his subject matter Instead of clarifying who s good and who s evil the way that the biblical Rapture does this one only intensifies feelings of doubt and bewilderment Factors in the author s inspiration include the shared tragedy of 9 11 but also the uncertainty generated by the more recent Great Recession There s just that moment when you can suddenly imagine that the very foundations of this culture that seems so strong could be shaken he says There are no photos with those IDs or post 52085 does not have any attached images Read more Books Culture Corner Jersey Living articles By submitting comments you grant permission for all or part of those comments to appear in the print edition of New Jersey Monthly 7 Songs to Comfort Christie on His Failed Presidential Bid Podcast Why We re Called The Garden State Table Hopping Jersey Shore Restaurant Week Melange in Somerville A Dress For Every Occasion NJ Father and Son s Wines Win Big 7 Dining Trends to Watch in 2016 February 2016 Best New Restaurants Table of Contents Subscribe Give a Gift Locate a Newsstand Purchase back issues View older issues Paper Mill Playhouse presents A Bronx Tale Millburn Feb 04 Mar 06 Frozen in Ice at Skylands Stadium Augusta Feb 05 Feb 28 The Beach Boys Morristown Feb 10 SOMA Film Festival South

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/where-has-everybody-gone/ (2016-02-11)
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  • George R.R. Martin Recalls The Bayonne Boyhood That Fired The Vivid Imagination Behind Game Of Thrones
    war on the continent of Westeros against the stoic Stark family of the North and pious Stannis Baratheon Across the Narrow Sea banished princess Daenerys Targaryen and her trio of baby dragons mustered support on the exotic continent of Essos to reclaim Westeros s Iron Throne Swords flashed heroes fell and fan favorite Tyrion Lannister played by Mendham actor Peter Dinklage waded through an ocean of blood and palace intrigue in hopes of securing his family s place as rulers of Westeros Dinklage has won an Emmy and a Golden Globe for his role in the series which itself has earned numerous honors including being named Outstanding New Program of 2011 by the Television Critics Association In the upcoming third season Martin s penchant for defying fairy tale conventions will be manifest in the death of some of his most popular characters Television critic David Bianculli who teaches the history of film and television at Rowan University and is the founder of the website TV Worth Watching was among those who were shocked when the first season s lead protagonist Ned Stark played by Sean Bean was beheaded Recommended Reading For WDHA The Song Remains the Same I love when that happens when a character you think is too central to the plot to be eliminated is suddenly gone says Bianculli Martin is tight lipped about the new season but he does acknowledge his delight with the addition of Diana Rigg to the cast The British actress famous for portraying the seductive spy Emma Peel on the 1960s TV series The Avengers will portray Olenna Tyrell the Queen of Thorns a wizened conniving noblewoman I grew up back in those Bayonne days watching The Avengers on TV Martin recalls Like every red blooded American and British boy I was madly in love with Emma Peel So it s very cool to have her in one of my projects To loyal followers Game of Thrones is unlike anything else on the small screen There are post apocalyptic shows Walking Dead Revolution vampire shows Vampire Diaries True Blood and fairy tale shows Grimm Once Upon a Time But for Bianculli there is nothing like Game of Thrones medieval chess board with its treasonous life or death political landscape As far as an entire universe being created whole cloth the closest precursor would be the Lord of the Rings films though that s not on television he says Martin who now lives in Santa Fe New Mexico has the stout build and bushy gray beard that might befit one of his characters He would look right at home with a flagon of mead in one hand and a poleaxe in the other For a writer of fantasy Martin is a realist You know if you would ask me back when I was writing it I would say this is never going to be made he concedes It has a cast of thousands it has an extremely complex plot it has dragons and direwolves

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/king-of-fantasy/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Q&A With Elizabeth Gilbert
    on your journey to the 19th century EG It s my wish and hope that I m historically accurate But I m sure I ll hear criticism from people who know those worlds better than I do NJM Why historical fiction Why not a modern story EG I can kind of trace the inspirational revolution in two parts The first part was discovering in my mother s house this 1784 edition of Captain Cook s Voyage I remember looking at it when I was a kid and it had these incredible illustrations That rekindled my love of that era And then the other part of it was settling down in New Jersey and wanting to know my own world better after having traveled so many years NJM But the book is set in Philadelphia not New Jersey EG Initially I wanted to set the book in New Jersey I wanted to write the big New Jersey novel I started gardening here and I started hiking and exploring this area stomping around from place to place Because I never knew one place well and I wondered How much can you learn about the world just from what s in your back yard I began to imagine this female botanist who was a great explorer but incapable of traveling My plan was to set the book right outside of Princeton but the evidence just grew and grew that the only place she could settle was Philadelphia because of the trade in America at the ports there and other reasons So with much reluctance I had to move it out of New Jersey Recommended Reading Red Ripe and Ready The New Jersey Tomato NJM Not entirely though EG Right Unfortunately the only part left in New Jersey is a mental hospital in Trenton NJM Did you write in Frenchtown EG I wrote all of it at home It was the first time I ve ever done that I tend to be unable to work with any distraction around me so in the past I ve had to farm myself out go away someplace The book is actually a testament to how quiet and nice my home life has become NJM You had complete privacy EG Actually it also became a part of the book that every night I would read what I had written to my husband It was a sweet thing something I had never done before I got to be Scheherazade I think it made the book a better book I had to keep his attention It was an act of love Before that I had never shown anybody anything I had written before I was done with it Because there s a bit of perfectionism in me NJM But you weren t worried about Jose s criticism EG It would be harder if I were married to a writer or an editor but he s just someone who likes a great story NJM Do you have a studio at home

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/gilbert/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Audible Founder Likes the Sound of Books
    article One Animal Year His byline has appeared in Rolling Stone Esquire Sports Illustrated Men s Journal and Worth Audible s uber modern offices in a high rise reflect Katz s reverence for books and authors Near the receptionist s desk is a digital crawl similar to the kind in Times Square that spools out the text of one of the 18 000 titles per year into which the company breathes new life via its roster of voice talent That roster includes famous voices Dustin Hoffman and Nicole Kidman have read for Audible as well as about 100 actors and actresses many from New Jersey moonlighting at the company s Newark studios until their next role comes along Katz jokes that as a journalist turned captain of industry he has a checkered past People still ask me Are you the same Don Katz who s the author he says I loved everything about that part of my life Recommended Reading Courting Danger Actress Christina Jackson But he also loves the mission that has turned Audible into the world s largest producer of audiobooks Most people s childhoods are marked by their parents reading stories to them he says There s a primordial pleasure to that and audiobooks are the way to rediscover it Read more Books Culture Corner Jersey Living People articles By submitting comments you grant permission for all or part of those comments to appear in the print edition of New Jersey Monthly 7 Songs to Comfort Christie on His Failed Presidential Bid Podcast Why We re Called The Garden State Table Hopping Jersey Shore Restaurant Week Melange in Somerville A Dress For Every Occasion NJ Father and Son s Wines Win Big 7 Dining Trends to Watch in 2016 February 2016 Best New Restaurants Table of Contents

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/audible-founder-likes-the-sound-of-books/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Independents' Day: The Rise of Indie Bookstores
    ended up closing says Sage EL Then there was 9 11 and we were affected by that And then there was the 2008 financial crisis We somehow re created ourselves every time and now the shift in the wind seems to be in our favor Right now I feel like people are appreciating bookstores as cultural centers in their community Recommended Reading Net Gains The History of Pound Fishing Montclair is one of the few New Jersey communities that support two bookstores While Watchung Booksellers handles only new books with about 30 000 titles from gardening to fiction to children s Montclair Book Center specializes in used books by the tens of thousands as well as new best sellers Across the state in Ocean City Wood Robinson owner of Bookateria Two employs a similar strategy but for a decidedly different crowd Robinson has been serving flip flop wearing tourists hungry for beach reads for 39 years He sells primarily paperbacks in his 800 square foot shop most of them used For decades regulars have been dropping their suitcases at their beach houses then dropping to their knees to poke through his bottom shelves for gently worn paperbacks upon arriving at the Shore I ve been through generations of voracious readers says Robinson Still he adds it s hard for any bookseller to stay in business these days Right now there are only two of us left in Ocean City But I remember when there used to be 10 In addition to the low cost of his used inventory what keeps Robinson afloat is an understanding of his clientele I think independent bookstores are the only kind that can survive in this climate says Robinson It takes an individual owner looking at his own individual store to see what has to be done to make people in his town happy That s why Borders and Barnes Noble fell off they were too big You have to be able to adapt he says For Robinson in addition to stocking page turners for tossing into beach bags that meant beefing up his children s selection after the closing of a local store that was a go to spot for kids titles He also pays attention to the needs of vacationing students A lot of times we get high school and college kids with summer reading lists and they need the classics he says We have them and for a whole lot cheaper than the 20 or 25 they d spend on a new book Margot Sage EL owner of Watchung Booksellers in Montclair Photo by Frank Marshall Just as Sage El accommodates Montclair s literati with cultural events and Robinson caters to Ocean City s sandy toed tourists with thrillers Scott Asalone co owner of Words Asbury Park has tried to mirror the cultural predilections he s observed in his Shore town since opening in 2009 People who come into the store are incredibly well read and want the most recent literary best

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/independents-day-rise-of-indie-bookstores/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Andrew Carnegie Built 36 Libraries In New Jersey, Which Have Survived Thanks To Preservation Efforts And Creative Reuse
    East Orange which received a 50 000 grant in 1900 The building currently houses the municipal court The last grant given in the state for 30 000 went to Long Branch in 1917 Only a third of all of the Carnegie libraries in the country bear the name Carnegie on their façade The Freehold Public Library built in 1903 is one of them Many Carnegie libraries are admired for their neoclassical design and Beaux Arts features such as arched windows grand entrances and elaborately sculpted details Such details can be seen in the libraries in Bayonne Elizabeth and Belmar each designed by Edward Lippincott Tilton an architect and classical scholar who specialized in library buildings He also designed the immigration building at Ellis Island Tilton s strikingly beautiful Bayonne Library vintage 1904 features a screen of columns at the entrance and a colonnaded courtyard The building made a lasting impression on Pat Naffin a resident of Wall Township who grew up in Bayonne It was a sacred place and gave me a sense of reverence and awe when I entered the courtyard greeted by huge columns and busts of historic figures says Naffin As a third generation resident of the city I felt the history of my own parents and grandparents who climbed those same steps before me Recommended Reading Giving Back Punkin Chunkin Raises 3 200 For St Jude Children s Research Hospital The architectural glories of the Carnegie libraries have at times fallen out of favor When an extension was added in 1981 to the Belleville Library many of its original 1911 architectural elements were covered over in an attempt at modernization But restoration is under way the plaster that had covered the original columns and pediment is being removed To have it available to see is meaningful considering we are an original Carnegie library says Richard Yanuzzi president of the library board Not every Carnegie library in New Jersey has lived to enjoy a comeback Former Carnegie library buildings in Collingswood Cranford Englewood Lakewood Little Falls Plainfield and Summit have been demolished In Camden the former library building is in limbo Opened in 1905 with a 120 000 Carnegie grant the building s beautiful neoclassical pediment and portico and columned entrance are still intact even if they look despairingly dismal Since 1986 when library services moved to two other locations in Camden the library added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 has sat empty a mastodon gathering dust Some Carnegie libraries have survived through what is called adaptive reuse The library in Vineland is now a senior center The building is intact and whatever renovations are made will adhere to historic accuracy says Bruce Turner the president of AIA of South Jersey A treasured part of the city s past the library building has kept its rooftop cupola and dome Another example of adaptive reuse is the old Union City Library Named for former Mayor William V Musto it serves as a community cultural

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/a-gift-that-keeps-on-giving/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Princeton's Salinger Stash
    written during World War II that in 1965 found a permanent home at Princeton University s Firestone Library Princeton s Salinger collection is unsurpassed especially in regards to his unpublished fiction says Fair Lawn resident Kenneth Slawnenski author of an earlier biography J D Salinger A Life These unpublished stories have a following says Don Skemer Firestone Library s curator of manuscripts Each week he says a handful of people read copies of the original double spaced manuscripts However media attention such as when Salinger died in January 2010 at age 91 typically boosts the number of inquiries about the author of The Catcher in the Rye Princeton received the five stories unavailable elsewhere when it acquired the archives of Story Press Story magazine which published Salinger s first story in 1940 The works were to be included in a short story collection but financing fell through and Salinger pulled back his work explains Slawnenski who is also the creator of deadcaulfields com a website devoted to the writer and named for Holden Caulfield protaganist of The Catcher in the Rye Access to the stories in the library s Special Collections section comes with restrictions Potential readers have to fill out a form and get a photo ID made To prevent copying readers cannot use a computer or take notes Salinger s literary trust controls the rights to the stories Recommended Reading Net Gains The History of Pound Fishing Salinger who was stationed in New Jersey at Fort Monmouth in 1942 was a member of the 4th Infantry Division and took part in the D Day invasion of France He participated in the liberation of Paris fought at the Battle of the Bulge and worked in counterintelligence questioning enemy prisoners of war according to Slawenski Of the five stories the two written during combat The Magic Foxhole and The Ocean Full of Bowling Balls are the best Slawenski says In these stories Salinger seriously engages themes of life and death for the first time and they also contain the first hints of mysticism in his writing An autobiographical sketch written by Salinger in November 1944 and included in the Princeton archive indicates his dedication to his work even in a combat zone Said Salinger Am still writing when I find time and an unoccupied foxhole There are no photos with those IDs or post 48183 does not have any attached images Read more Books Jersey Living articles By submitting comments you grant permission for all or part of those comments to appear in the print edition of New Jersey Monthly 7 Songs to Comfort Christie on His Failed Presidential Bid Podcast Why We re Called The Garden State Table Hopping Jersey Shore Restaurant Week Melange in Somerville A Dress For Every Occasion NJ Father and Son s Wines Win Big 7 Dining Trends to Watch in 2016 February 2016 Best New Restaurants Table of Contents Subscribe Give a Gift Locate a Newsstand Purchase back issues View older issues Paper Mill

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/princetons-salinger-stash/ (2016-02-11)
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  • Lawns and Literacy: Little Free Libraries
    of thousands of people are delighted to bring their neighborhoods back via Little Free Libraries says the founder We ve had people tell us I bought a house in this neighborhood because it had a Little Free Library Benkard a school librarian was enamored with several LFLs she saw on a visit to Wisconsin For her birthday her husband built her a little library He gave it to me unpainted just before Hurricane Sandy hit I spent the days while school was closed painting and sealing it she says LFLs can be found in front of homes throughout the state but also at the Christina Seix Academy in Trenton the Boonton Township athletic fields the community center in Asbury Park and outside of apartment buildings in Jersey City Metuchen and Whitesboro The waterproof wooden structures are as individual as the communities they serve Some stewards build and decorate their mini libraries while others purchase ready made designs from littlefreelibrary org Craftsman Jody Williams of Sergeantsville based the village s LFL on the carriage shed that once stood beside the municipal building where the little library is located The artwork on Asbury Park s first LFL was created by local tattoo artists Recommended Reading Net Gains The History of Pound Fishing In Princeton the Bunting Family LFL is a red phone box reflecting their British roots In Summit Mattie Azurmendi and her two sons decorated an oversized white mailbox with storybook characters The Linwood LFL was a post Sandy community project A grant from the Reading Council of Southern New Jersey and Usborne Books provided the seed money to stock the box Last November the nonprofit Newark Downtown District NDD installed the first of several LFLs planned for the city on the edge of Washington Park The library is a triplex three boxes under a single roof To date 2 600 books all donated through collection bins and by city employees have found their way into residents hands Here most people don t bring the books back says NDD project manager Steve Hillyer but from our perspective as long as we are providing access to something residents don t have then it s successful In Bradley Beach the public library hosts two boardwalk LFLs We like the community that has grown up around providing books and caring for our little libraries says director Janet Torsney Having books available for free at a place where people are relaxing is a wonderful way to get people reading Freelance writer Susan Cousins Breen wishes her hometown of Mickleton had a Little Free Library There are no photos with those IDs or post 89556 does not have any attached images Read more Books Culture Corner Jersey Living articles By submitting comments you grant permission for all or part of those comments to appear in the print edition of New Jersey Monthly 7 Songs to Comfort Christie on His Failed Presidential Bid Podcast Why We re Called The Garden State Table Hopping Jersey Shore Restaurant Week

    Original URL path: http://njmonthly.com/articles/jersey-living/lawns-and-literacy-little-free-libraries/ (2016-02-11)
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