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  • On An Overgrown Path: Jonathan Harvey on the record
    don t know whether academic is the word but a little too lacking in immediacy By his lights I m sure that was correct BS Jonathan so far we ve talked about purely musical influences on you But extra musical influences have also been very important on your development as a composer One of the extra musical influences was the Austrian polymath Rudolf Steiner Today Steiner is best known for the many schools based on his educational principles How did he influence you JH I read about forty of his books He was an extraordinary man He used to lecture apparently nearly every evening of his mature life in a different place and he always had a faithful dictation lady who would scribble it down and so they are published And they amount to forty or fifty books a series of lectures and they re all different That is the remarkable thing They all bring something new each evening So I immersed myself in Steiner and the effect was to really deepen the possibilities of life A little bit like a scientist telling us about the atoms and the molecules behind the table and the piano that we look at Steiner showed that the whole of life is based on energy and not only energy but energy of certain character and colour And he could see these colours with the auric vision that he had the clairvoyance and he could analyse people that way like insight into people s personalities he could analyse illness but he could analyse material substance And not only that but he had a lot of theories about the afterlife the nature of what happens after death and he was in the Buddhist tradition of course of reincarnation and what happens in between death and rebirth he explained in great detail The fascinating thing is a lot of these details were artistic in the form of colour and musical in the form of sound So he would explain what it is like to be dead in terms of sound And that s quite mind boggling Of course I don t know whether it s true or not but I know that Steiner was a man of great integrity so I read what he says with a feeling and the instinct that a lot of it could be true And I ve come across nothing in life to convince me that it is untrue So that s how I stand with Steiner and how he began to influence my thinking about sound and the fluidity of the world Everything merges into everything else Everything is impermanent as the Buddhists say Nothing is fixed and solid BS Rudolf Steiner founded a new spiritual movement with links to Theosophy which brings us on to the topic of Buddhism I mentioned in my introduction that Buddhist themes recur in your music Is it fair to call you a Buddhist composer or is that too neat a pigeon hole JH All artists I think try different paths They constantly change and they have their this period or their that period Now I m not saying that the Buddhist thing is my Buddhist period I think it goes back rather longer than that I came across Buddhism perhaps after Steiner but even before that when I was a student at Cambridge But I was never really wholeheartedly into it So I ve been Buddhist most of my life but the Buddhist period would be quite recently if you looked at the titles of my music and the explicit musical themes maybe ten or fifteen years And I don t mind being called a Buddhist composer But like all artists I don t like being called only a Buddhist composer So of course it s a subject I could expand on for a long time about what being a Buddhist composer is but that s another story BS Jonathan turning back to your music back in 1996 you said in an interview Serialism has crashed It was supposed to transform structure but people could not get any further We re fourteen years on from that statement have your views on serialism changed And how do you view the other fashionable music isms that have come along JH No my view of serialism hasn t really changed it is of course a matter of how well the composer deals with serialism Serialism is a tool and some composers can use it very well Stockhausen I think extended serialism to include everything just before he died he was working on serial fragrances and sending those into the auditorium in serial form And he designed his house which I ve been into in serial form a fascinating structure So he extended serialism far beyond the twelve notes And in a way serialism has a very fundamental point that you arrange something in a certain way and that can then expand to anything The first serialists which I was really talking about when I said serialism has crashed were the ones who just used serialism for pitch or mainly for pitch and then there would be a conflict of interest between non serial thought and a serial kind of hoping to tie it all together spirit which to my mind crashed completely And a lot of composers continued to write that until recently but they still do and I feel it s dangerous BS In Arnold Whittall s 1999 book about you in the Composers of Today series he spoke about the appeal of music that integrates the linear styles of past centuries with the global music of the 20th century which resonates with the popularity of world music Jonathan looking today from the second decade of the 21st century how do you think that integration between the linear styles and the global styles has progressed JH Aha That s actually a slight misunderstanding of what I said but I ll try and answer your question even so I think I was talking about linear time and global time by which I meant the kind of time that is a depiction of eternity In other words you look back at the end of the piece and you see that it has made a harmonious form but you have not walked along a narrative line Which is a different kind of time And that was the revolution of the so called Darmstadt School the people like Stockhausen and Boulez and so on who wrote after the Second World War That has had an interesting interaction with linear time which is more Hans Keller s sort of time where everything comes after what has gone before in a line a meaningful line and a mixture of the two as in a composer like Messiaen who often seems to be completely static for a whole quarter of an hour and it s wonderful you contrast that with his linear structures which develop But you were really asking more about global music I think BS Yes JH And world music and that s another question The influence of what we can buy in every record store or hear every day on the radio is bound to be enormous obviously None of us would probably be claiming to be free from that For me it s come via the cultures whose philosophy and spirituality I like or that have deeply influenced me like Hinduism or Tibetan Buddhism so those two musics have been very influential on me and I have even been I think noticeably influenced people talk about my tabla imitations on the cello a work like Advaya or One Evening where I recorded electronically tablas and treated them in all sorts of ways so those are examples of Indian rhythm structure And my opera Wagner Dream takes an Indian subject which took place in India at the time of the Buddha and that uses the drone instruments or electronic imitations of them or even recordings of them through much of the music And it has similar taal rhythmic structures taken from Indian music BS Staying with global cultural influences in 1966 you set a poem by the Sufi saint and mystic Mawlānā Rumi How could the soul take flight is inspired by the ecstatic vision of Sufism and that s far removed from the contemplative Christian text you set fifteen years earlier in your Passion and Resurrection Can music cause spiritual elevation And taking the discussion further into the esoteric realm and in fact I think you touched on this when you were talking about Rudolf Steiner can music transform matter JH Yes let s first of all look at spiritual elevation I think I ve always believed that even in Passion and Resurrection the resurrection music is for me a new sort of music that I wrote which is not bass dominated it s sort of centred around the middle and it floats from the middle either side of this middle structure And that for me represents the change of the world at the time of the Resurrection and the elevation there the release from gravity of Christ rising So I think that s been there all along with my Sufi settings and many things a release into a world of ecstasy this is what music does And the question of whether music can transform matter is a very big question We all know about the soprano shattering the wine glass It s all vibrations I mean music and the world everything is oscillation Energy is oscillation largely And when we say we are stirred by a piece of music we re excited we are moved and so on we re talking as if we are like a tuning fork which has been struck by some music and it s continued to vibrate for some time and then it stops vibrating and you re no longer moved by that experience it may last a few minutes or a few hours or a few weeks It depends on the intensity of the striking So music is always putting us into vibration I was talking to a neurologist who s done very interesting hyper sophisticated brain scans for people listening to music and she has published results showing how the neurons affected vibrate in precisely the rhythm of the music being played And if the tempo of the music being played to the subject changes so does the neuron visibly change its firing tempo this probably proves what we sense intuitively But your question can music transform matter when we look at that computer screen and see this in the form of the matter of the brain being transformed by the music it s rather moving and rather important I think And the whole culture of music probably from the very beginnings has been founded surely on vibrating together in a community to a drum beat We all begin to dance we all begin to sing in unison This unison of a community of people has been profoundly important for the human identity The identity of tribes and nations and groups So at many many levels one can find music transforming the brain and I think the material world BS Jonathan let s stay with that all important interface between art and science and then move on to electronics Electronics or to be more precise electro acoustics play an important part in your music We ve heard how your love affair with electronics started with Stockhausen and Babbitt but it was really consummated during your period in the 1980s in Paris at IRCAM with Pierre Boulez You ve described your time at IRCAM as a gift from God Can you tell us about that gift JH Well Boulez is sometimes called god in Paris but anyway he gave this thing to the world because of his powerful personality his absolute determination to come back to Paris from Germany where he had decided to live until that point and if he came back to Paris President Pompidou would give him a large budget for creating a new institute So it was a sort of gift to composers I thought it was a gift from God because my first essays in electronic music were so difficult I started in Princeton with Babbitt and I won t go into all the complications but in short one would compute on a huge tape for about eight hours overnight and end up with one pathetic simple minute of sound which probably was completely wrong and one would have to start all over again One went from that to the IRCAM of the eighties and there one was given a tutor That was very important Someone who knew all the ins and outs of what was available the software and the hardware and was designated to help you That tutor or assistant as it s now called was crucial of sic Boulez So composers were invited and they got stuck into new thinking with the help of their tutor and began to create much much more easily with much greater pleasure and delight than they would in this incredibly bloody hard work they had to do before BS Jonathan you gave us rather beautiful summaries of Benjamin Britten and Karlheinz Stockhausen as creative personalities and now Pierre Boulez another one of the great creative personalities has come into the discussion Can you give us a thumbnail of Pierre Boulez as a creative personality JH Well as you say a very strong creative personality and a strong personality and that s what that postwar movement needed strong personalities people who would really change the world they were all strong personalities Luigi Nono too and Luciano Berio Boulez particularly perhaps the most of all he was able to change the politics of the musical Europe I would say singlehandedly And he did this of course against enormous opposition and nasty things written about him everywhere But he was too strong for them you know they didn t affect him they all rolled off his back and he gave as good as he got So I think everybody knows what he has done he created the IRCAM he created the Ensemble Intercontemporain he s created new standards in conducting the 20th century classics and later up to the present day and of course last and not least at all he created some of the finest compositions of the time But if we re talking about strength of personality one has to admire him really that he was so determined and so it s so impossible for him to accept no from politicians I mean he just rubbished them the feeble minded ministers of culture and so on in Paris So would that we had someone like that BS Staying with the influence of Pierre Boulez electronics have allowed you to explore the technique of spectralism This breaks sound down into its constituent components Many listeners will not be familiar with this technique so can you explain how it works and particularly what opportunities it offers you as a composer JH One of the things that spectralism has done is to replace serialism and intervallicism By that I mean working with intervals as the primary listening object How intervals follow each other and how they make patterns whereas spectralism is more about harmony And it s based on the study of the harmonic series the acoustically natural phenomenon which you find in most instruments and of course its transformation Because we re living in an electronic age and we can do whatever we like by computer we can do whatever we like to music in the microcosm We can get into the structure of music and change that So the harmonic series can be as it were stalled by the computer for any particular instrument my favourite trombone or whatever each one will have a slightly different harmonic series for each note it plays So it s very particular and that series can then be manipulated either printed out in numbers which can be then orchestrated or it can be replayed as partials which are then transposed a little bit So if you take the seventeenth partial and you want to make it a bit lower you can do that on the computer that is spectralism What the beauty of that is is less easy to describe But I would say spectralism is basically a colour thinking At its broadest it s just colour thinking Going the direction that someone like Debussy pointed where you work primarily with mixing colours and making extraordinarily subtle blends of colour which perhaps have never existed before and that is the way you think and structure music It doesn t just take the argument of a good melody and then you colour it it starts with the colour and then it might make a melody of colour but it starts at the other end BS I said at the beginning of the program that your music has reached a remarkably wide audience I think it s also true to say that you ve achieved this without artistic compromise Jonathan we live in an age where compromise is expected or even demanded of the arts For instance we have classical chart radio and classical talent shows on television From your position as one of our senior composers how do you see the future for what Pierre Boulez described as musique savant JH Musique savant is quite an often used word in French actually it means I suppose learned music And it s something they talk about in a way we don t I think it offends our democratic instinct or something I don t know But it s taken for granted that if you go to a conservatory or if you study music you are getting into learned music So part at least of what you

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  • On An Overgrown Path: Intimations of mortality
    doesn t seem too bad a fate Have you seen wings of desire btw Take care b 8 27 am Pliable said Billoo thanks for that Yes the hotel is quite nice But one of the downsides of mortality is hospital food even in France Wings of desire are currently limited to vin rouge which I am not allowed to drink for a while 9 27 am Book hound said Sorry to hear your news hope you re soon feeling better 11 18 am Reinhold Behringer said Best wishes for recovery 11 06 am Lyle Sanford RMT said What a drag I d been thinking of you off gallivanting around having fun poking around galleries and record shops photographing signs and sights and looking and listening for musics offering transmission Glad you seem to be over the worst and wishing you a speedy recovery 1 40 pm Post a Comment Newer Post Older Post Home Subscribe to Post Comments Atom Chance headlines Loading Search On An Overgrown Path Loading Blog Archive 2016 19 February 5 January 14 2015 196 December 21 November 9 October 23 September 24 August 13 July 25 June 12 May 12 April 17 March 3 February 21 January 16 2014 211 December 13 November 23 October 13 September 19 August 17 July 10 June 21 May 27 April 15 March 2 February 23 January 28 2013 257 December 21 November 17 October 31 September 8 August 35 July 24 June 24 May 8 April 31 March 8 February 24 January 26 2012 276 December 22 November 25 October 23 September 12 August 20 July 27 June 27 May 7 April 32 March 27 February 24 January 30 2011 299 December 22 November 21 October 42 September 12 August 24 July 38 June 29 Who needs self

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  • On An Overgrown Path: Sea interlude
    from the media because my view is the reward for being involved was to see Connor beaming from ear to ear at the hospital later in the evening not being hailed as a celebrity in the press For this reason I have also turned off the comments facility on this post But sadly others have turned the rescue into a minor media circus to meet their own ends As well as the highly inaccurate nature of some of the reports I am concerned that press statements imply that blame for the incident lies with the two youngsters Connor was at the beach with a friend and his mother for entering the water when lifeguards were off duty This is a very simplistic and dangerous conclusion to draw particularly as those making the statements only arrived at the end of the rescue Gorleston beach has a tragic history of similar incidents and a double fatality last year was chillingly similar to the events of Wednesday My view is that instead of issuing knee jerk press releases aimed at the soft target of young people the public services should be asking some important questions These include whether there are adequate warnings on the beach of strong currents and the rapidly shelving bottom and whether swimming should be allowed at all from the beach immediately adjacent to the harbour breakwater For these reasons I am putting this post on record in the hope that it will help prevent further terror and tragedy Now for the amusing side of Wednesday evening Next time I will make sure I am not wearing white cotton underwear as the paramedic pointed out after checking my vital signs cotton become transparent when wet I buy cheap expendable watches and on Wednesday I was wearing a 15 mail order timepiece whose claim to be water protected to some depth had not been tested by me I can now confirm that claim If you are thinking of trying something similar make sure your wife is present my back now sports interesting looking fingernail scratches And finally as Benjamin Britten also knew swimming in the North Sea can be rejuvenating the BBC news coverage described me as a man in his 50s Cover image is my 1977 LP of Bernstein conducting Britten s Four Sea Interludes Passacaglia from Peter Grimes which plays as I write The painting which resonates with events of Wednesday evening is Le Nuage by Gustave Courbet The 1945 premiere of Peter Grimes was directed by the conductor described here previously as The Holy Fool Later I said no comments but I have to share this link Thanks Will appreciated Any copyrighted material on these pages is included as fair use for the purpose of study review or critical analysis only and will be removed at the request of copyright owner s Report broken links missing images and errors to overgrownpath at hotmail dot co dot uk Posted by Pliable at Friday July 09 2010 Email This BlogThis

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  • On An Overgrown Path: Dance is not an inferior art form
    Hall had acoustics to die for and was venue for many classic recordings including Britten s own interpretation of his War Requiem The hall was last used for recording in 1984 and was demolished in 1998 to be replaced by a faceless international hotel Now read about an inspirational 21st century dance company Image credit Portrait of Sergei Diaghilev by Valentin Serov 1904 Any copyrighted material on these pages is included for fair use for the purpose of study review or critical analysis only and will be removed at the request of copyright owner s Report broken links missing images and other errors to overgrownpath at hotmail dot co dot uk Posted by Pliable at Friday February 09 2007 Email This BlogThis Share to Twitter Share to Facebook Share to Pinterest Labels andre previn ballet ballet rambert classical music dance john drummond kingsway hall sergei diaghilev vladimir ashkenazy 2 comments Pliable said Very remiss of me indeed not to mention John Drummond s definitve book on Diaghilev which is alas out of print 11 00 am Vanessa Lann said It s available on Amazon com for as low as 7 dollars Just a few copies left 4 59 am Post a Comment Newer Post Older Post Home Subscribe to Post Comments Atom Chance headlines Loading Search On An Overgrown Path Loading Blog Archive 2016 19 February 5 January 14 2015 196 December 21 November 9 October 23 September 24 August 13 July 25 June 12 May 12 April 17 March 3 February 21 January 16 2014 211 December 13 November 23 October 13 September 19 August 17 July 10 June 21 May 27 April 15 March 2 February 23 January 28 2013 257 December 21 November 17 October 31 September 8 August 35 July 24 June 24 May 8 April 31 March 8 February 24 January 26 2012 276 December 22 November 25 October 23 September 12 August 20 July 27 June 27 May 7 April 32 March 27 February 24 January 30 2011 299 December 22 November 21 October 42 September 12 August 24 July 38 June 29 May 5 April 34 March 9 February 33 January 30 2010 281 December 37 November 20 October 36 September 7 August 37 July 27 May 17 April 33 March 12 February 26 January 29 2009 367 December 22 November 23 October 33 September 7 August 35 July 30 May 42 April 39 March 41 February 47 January 48 2008 476 December 38 November 40 October 57 September 39 August 36 July 42 June 9 May 54 April 41 March 44 February 30 January 46 2007 572 December 43 November 65 October 55 September 11 August 46 July 57 June 48 May 52 April 52 March 53 February 49 Israel can do dance Music is in the soul of Russia The first twelve tone protest song A troubled cure for a troubled mind Western takes on Russian music An artist is transforming all the time World exclusive on the Oscars Catch this

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  • On An Overgrown Path: Ambiguous music
    talks of a lament as a longing for change in a world I often do not understand and elsewhere expresses concerns about Western involvement in the Middle East Unambiguous concepts such as classical or world music autocracy or democracy Eastern or Western good or evil Christian or Muslim and winning and losing are central to a binary culture Let us hope Lamentation s is the pre echo of a move away from dualism towards a more ambiguous and more inclusive future Lamentations was supplied as a requested review sample and my thanks go to Scott Menhinick at Improvised Communications for responding to a request from far away across the ocean Report broken links missing images and errors to overgrownpath at hotmail dot co dot uk Also on Facebook and Twitter Posted by Pliable at Wednesday March 02 2011 Email This BlogThis Share to Twitter Share to Facebook Share to Pinterest Labels Allos Musica andre rieu anouar brahem James Falzone Jazz middle east muslim olivier messiaen Ronnie Malley Tim Mulvenna world music x factor No comments Post a Comment Newer Post Older Post Home Subscribe to Post Comments Atom Chance headlines Loading Search On An Overgrown Path Loading Blog Archive 2016 19 February 5 January 14 2015 196 December 21 November 9 October 23 September 24 August 13 July 25 June 12 May 12 April 17 March 3 February 21 January 16 2014 211 December 13 November 23 October 13 September 19 August 17 July 10 June 21 May 27 April 15 March 2 February 23 January 28 2013 257 December 21 November 17 October 31 September 8 August 35 July 24 June 24 May 8 April 31 March 8 February 24 January 26 2012 276 December 22 November 25 October 23 September 12 August 20 July 27 June 27 May

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  • On An Overgrown Path: Antal Dorati the composer
    at showcasing rarely heard modern music with little preparation time But one small gripe I m afraid the cult of the media personality or just plain sloppy sub editing means both the BBC Radio 3 and the BBC Symphony websites tell us the name of the continuity announcer and soloist but not the conductor Web resources For audio file of an interview with legendary Mercury producer Wilma Cozart Fine follow this link Antal Dorati web site Image credit Antal Dorati from WFCR Image owners if you do not want your picture used in this article please contact me and it will be removed Report broken links missing images and other errors to overgrownpath at hotmail dot co dot uk If you enjoyed this post take An Overgrown Path to Who am I attaca Posted by Pliable at Thursday March 16 2006 Email This BlogThis Share to Twitter Share to Facebook Share to Pinterest 2 comments Pliable said I should have mentioned in my article that Maestro Dorati has an important anniversary this year He was born in Budapest on April 9 1906 1 29 pm Anonymous said Dear Pliable Many thanks for your article and I m glad to know you were listening The conductor was Joseph Swensen Regards Helen Garrison Helen Garrison Senior Producer BBC Radio 3 Room 3018 Broadcasting House Portland Place London W1A 1AA tel 020 7765 3242 int 02 53242 Website http www bbc co uk radio3 10 44 am Post a Comment Newer Post Older Post Home Subscribe to Post Comments Atom Chance headlines Loading Search On An Overgrown Path Loading Blog Archive 2016 19 February 5 January 14 2015 196 December 21 November 9 October 23 September 24 August 13 July 25 June 12 May 12 April 17 March 3 February 21 January 16 2014 211 December 13 November 23 October 13 September 19 August 17 July 10 June 21 May 27 April 15 March 2 February 23 January 28 2013 257 December 21 November 17 October 31 September 8 August 35 July 24 June 24 May 8 April 31 March 8 February 24 January 26 2012 276 December 22 November 25 October 23 September 12 August 20 July 27 June 27 May 7 April 32 March 27 February 24 January 30 2011 299 December 22 November 21 October 42 September 12 August 24 July 38 June 29 May 5 April 34 March 9 February 33 January 30 2010 281 December 37 November 20 October 36 September 7 August 37 July 27 May 17 April 33 March 12 February 26 January 29 2009 367 December 22 November 23 October 33 September 7 August 35 July 30 May 42 April 39 March 41 February 47 January 48 2008 476 December 38 November 40 October 57 September 39 August 36 July 42 June 9 May 54 April 41 March 44 February 30 January 46 2007 572 December 43 November 65 October 55 September 11 August 46 July 57 June 48 May 52 April 52 March 53

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  • On An Overgrown Path: Classical music and the feel good factor
    hope 4 06 am Chopin said I doubt classical music will ever die I agree the so called popular music genre today is a lot more accessible and appeals to the gen X Y because of its wider market and commercial potential However newer performers such as Lang Lang whose foundation is inspiring 40 million young Chinese children to play the piano is certainly encouraging and I suspect his is not the only such organisation that is doing good work to promote classical music among the young 4 24 am The Unrepentant Pelleastrian said The new sciece of epigenetics has identified that the cells that make up our body and determine our wellbeing are not controlled primarily by our genes but rather by the physical and energetic environment in which we live Well this certainly does not apply to intelligence Read here http www psych utoronto ca users reingold courses intelligence cache 1198gottfred html Re Classical music It was always a minority taste and only became remotely popular when the alternatives were few and far between This is not because most people are thick or philistines but simply because classical music requires a level of commitment that most people are not prepared to give or more likely interested in giving 4 47 am Nereffid said If a health benefit of classical music is to be shown I doubt it will be through epigenetics It is as you say science rather than quackery but its implications are rather overhyped as exmplified by the Horizon piece you linked to with its breathless talk of paradigm shifts and ghost worlds If epigenetics is to demonstrate that classical music makes you healthier or smarter it will have to show that you are healthier or smarter than your peers because you carry a change in gene expression resulting from the fact that one or more of your parents or one or more of your grandparents listened to more classical music than their peers There are so many potential confounders here education socioeconomic status etc that it s hard to see how a specific effect of music could be isolated This is also the problem with the wilder claims of the Mozart Effect Is your child smarter because you played her Mozart every night or because she was raised by the sort of parents who want her to be smarter and so will do things like play her Mozart every night The more basic or honest if you will form of the Mozart effect offers a better chance of some well being music link but it s not quite so impressive a temporary improvement in spatial reasoning immediately after hearing Mozart And there is also evidence that it doesn t have to be Mozart but anything that enhances one s mood Perhaps if the original researchers had been a little more left field in their choice of music to study we would now be talking about the Salieri Effect 7 49 am Pliable said Epigenetics may or may not be relevant to the future of classical music But the surprising level of interest in this post does confirm that Surely it is it time to explore new ways of arguing the case for classical music Yes some of the advocacy of epigenetics is evangelical But no more so that a Decca press release for the signing of their latest pianist wunderkind We must be careful of closing our minds to developments such as epigenetics simply because such solutions lie outside our intellectual comfort zone And we must also guard against allowing such developments to be swept under the carpet because they are outside the earnings zone of the artists agents media companies and marketing consultants who currently control classical music I am now away from my computer for a day or so in search of some wellbeing so there will be a delay in comment moderation But please keep the comments coming personally I find them a hundred times more rewarding than the currently fashionable Twitter games that are the staple fare elsewhere 8 51 am mrG said LOL As a graduate of that program I would hesitate to put too much faith in U of T Psych papers and ditto the newly pay walled SciAm but that s another issue Let s just say all the results are by no means in and that we have documented some 5 thousand years to the contrary although the contrarians will insist that this is both insufficient and not rigourous read Contradicts our pet assumptions But I would add that it is not necessarily the exposure to an atTUNEment that has the most effect but the giving of oneself over to the process through playing through dance not through sitting in an armchair imagining doing both Or jogging Thus I have stopped calling what I aim for music and prefer now the term bio resonance research a sub discipline of communications Here is a case in point GBSS orchestras maintain Kiwanis festival gold streak http bit ly dFifM1 is a news story about an small local high school who have achieved an astounding 33 instrumental program enrollment and with a student body of just 500 have consistently produced gold winning orchestras for 8 years straight Note especially the comments from the kids themselves testifying to the power being inside the music has over them both Classical and big band jazz but of particular note I see there is a strong mention of the personality of their teacher and this I believe is the really important medicinal component The music per se is not doing it so it won t come from an iPod ear bud or a stack of Bose sub woofers it has to be channeled directly from one living human to another and the medium of that channel is the Music So what we need to mass produce this effect is a list of things we need the right kind of music whatever that is it

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  • On An Overgrown Path: Churnalism is destroying classical music
    will see fit to redact her post http jessicamusic blogspot co uk 2015 09 sokolov refuses cremona prize html 1 30 pm Antoine Leboyer said How revealing of the state of this art I do not want to say of this industry that leadership comes from someone like Sokolov who is a pure outsider no web site no tweeter account no recording contract and artistically someone who is simply different and personal There is both artistic and personal integrity on Sokolov in concert and in his life We need more like him and less NLs 2 07 pm CremonaFiere said Hi just to clarify the official position of CremonaFiere organizer of Cremona Mondomusica and the Cremona Music Award I d like to inform you that CremonaFiere launched the Cremona Music Award which is given within Cremona Mondomusica and Piano Experience since 2014 in order to reward the international personalities that have arisen in their respective areas of interest in the world of music In 2014 we awarded Micheal Nyman Composition category Alfred Brendel Interpretation category Norman Lebrecht Communication category FuturOrchestra Project category These people came to Cremona to receive the prize except from Norman Lebrecht who was unable to come and sent a video message This year our Artistic Committee considered to award Krzysztof Penderecki Composition Grigory Sokolov Interpretation Corinna Da Fonseca Wollheim music critic of the New York Times Communication Stefano Belisari aka Elio Project Maestros Penderecki and Belisari and Corinna Da Fonseca Wollheim have come to Cremona to receive the prize while Maestro Sokolov sent us a letter to refuse the prize justifying this choice with the presence of Norman Lebrecht among the people awarded in 2014 We don t want to discuss the personal relationship between Maestro Sokolov and Norman Lebrecht we are just very sorry about Sokolov s choice especially considering that Franco Panozzo Sokolov s manager sent us an email on August 4th 2015 saying that Maestro Sokolov would have been very happy to come to Cremona to receive the prize if he had been in Italy during Cremona Mondomusica We also have to say that before that June 29th 2015 we informed Franco Panozzo about the people awarded in 2014 Norman Lebrecht included So we have been surprised that just a few days before the prize giving ceremony Maestro Sokolov took this decision Best regards Paolo Bodini 2 36 pm crosseyedpianist com said JD s pleading that writers such as herself and NL are mere minnows is disingenuous as she obviously wants us to respond by saying au contraire you and your writerly cohort are incredibly important in our profession I do find this kind of journalism and cliqueyness really quite sickening 3 29 pm Pliable said More on churnalism http goo gl gikpp7 8 24 am Hermann Max said Mr Bodini If you value your fund reputation you would not put Lebrecht on the same level with so respected people like Grigory Sokolov and Krzysztof Penderecki http www nytimes com 2007 10 20

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