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  • NSF Proposal Deadline: Ocean Technology and Interdisciplinary Coordination Program | PolarTREC
    Preexisting Relationships Resources Teacher Application Teacher FAQ Teacher Webinar Login For Researchers Overview Join Researcher Application Researcher Webinar Researcher FAQ Why Host a Teacher Quotes From Researchers Visiting a Classroom Access Resources Here Preexisting Relationships Resources Overview About Products Expedition Reports Collections Media Archive Find a Resource Contribute Fast and Fun Facts En Español Search form Search T eachers and R esearchers E xploring and C ollaborating Virtual Base Camp Calendar NSF Proposal Deadline Ocean Technology and Interdisciplinary Coordination Program Event Type Funding Deadlines When 15 February 2016 Where Online NSF Division of Ocean Sciences The Oceanographic Technology and Interdisciplinary Coordination OTIC Program supports a broad range of research and technology development activities Unsolicited proposals are accepted for instrumentation development that has broad applicability to ocean science research projects and that enhance observational experimental or analytical capabilities of the ocean science research community Specific announcements for funding opportunities are made for additional projects involving Improvements in Facilities Communications and Equipment at Biological Field Stations and Marine Laboratories FSML and the National Ocean Partnership Program More information http www nsf gov funding pgm summ jsp pims id 12724 amp org NSF amp sel org NSF amp from f About Virtual Base

    Original URL path: https://www.polartrec.com/events/41287 (2016-02-14)
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  • NSF Proposal Deadline: Marine Geology and Geophysics Program | PolarTREC
    Teacher Webinar Login For Researchers Overview Join Researcher Application Researcher Webinar Researcher FAQ Why Host a Teacher Quotes From Researchers Visiting a Classroom Access Resources Here Preexisting Relationships Resources Overview About Products Expedition Reports Collections Media Archive Find a Resource Contribute Fast and Fun Facts En Español Search form Search T eachers and R esearchers E xploring and C ollaborating Virtual Base Camp Calendar NSF Proposal Deadline Marine Geology and Geophysics Program Event Type Funding Deadlines When 15 February 2016 Where Online NSF Division of Ocean Sciences The Marine Geology and Geophysics program supports research on all aspects of geology and geophysics of the ocean basins and margins as well as the Great Lakes The Program includes Structure tectonic evolution and volcanic activity of the ocean basins the continental margins the mid ocean ridges and island arc systems Processes controlling exchange of heat and chemical species between seawater and ocean rocks Genesis chemistry and mineralogic evolution of marine sediments Processes controlling deposition erosion and transport of marine sediments Past ocean circulation patterns and climates and Interactions of continental and marine geologic processes More information http www nsf gov funding pgm summ jsp pims id 11726 amp org NSF amp sel

    Original URL path: https://www.polartrec.com/events/41288 (2016-02-14)
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  • 13 February 2016 Where In The World Is Iceland? | PolarTREC
    JFK Airport Weather Summary Really really cold Wind Speed 20 Temperature 11 Wind Chill 0 Location Location Location Hey any interest in going to Iceland asked Katie Farmer a friend and co worker at Springs School asked me back in December Maybe And after a quick discussion with my husband Gary who was unfortunately too busy with work to join the adventure my trip back towards the Arctic began or did it Carry On Only After several travels to Alaska with PolarTREC and my original research team and bringing WAY TOO MUCH CLOTHING the first few trips I was determined to pack only what I would actually use This trip I d only be gone for one week so could I manage Carry On only I started packing a week early so I could edit my choices during the week And the results are shown in the photo below Carry on luggage only Will it be enough to keep me warm in Iceland Photo by Lisa Seff February 13 2016 Changes in Latitude changes in Longitude And now I m sitting in JFK Airport at 8 00pm in New York waiting for my Delta flight to Reykjavik the capitol of Iceland Am I headed to the Arctic Check out the google map below and let me know what you think After I land in Iceland I ll be back to let you know Flight path from JFK to Iceland Is Iceland North of the Arctic Circle Screenshot by Lisa Seff Google Map February 13 2016 Photos Oceanographic Conditions of Bowhead Whale Habitat 2014 Team Member Lisa Seff Share on Facebook Tweet Widget Google Plus One Oceanographic Conditions of Bowhead Whale Habitat 2014 Journals Jump to Journal 11 February 2014 Off to Alaska 11 February 2014 Snow Angels Moose 13 February

    Original URL path: https://www.polartrec.com/expeditions/oceanographic-conditions-of-bowhead-whale-habitat-2014/journals/2016-02-13 (2016-02-14)
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  • 11 February 2016 Weddell Seal Pregnancy and Gestation | PolarTREC
    Photo credit Rose John 2002 In the field So how do we know that a seal is pregnant We can see that a seal is pregnant using an ultrasound machine Ultrasound machine Basically an ultrasound uses sound waves to see inside a body in our case a seal It sends sound waves too high for us to hear into a body The sound hits a surface like tissue bone muscle etc and bounce back like an echo in a cave to produce a picture Doctors often use ultrasounds on pregnant women to monitor the growth of a baby we use it to detect if a seal is pregnant Not very many people know how to do this in wild animals like our seals so the team has had special veterinarians come to Antarctica and they are the experts This is the ultrasound machine we use Photo credit Gregg Adams Advanced technology allowing us to use an ultrasound in the field and even the Antarctic is quite a feat and allows us to see a lot about the seal s pregnancy without disrupting the pregnancy at all The Embryos Now in the January February field season the team comes back to see if the seals we tagged in October November are pregnant So since 1 2 months have gone by and diapause would have ended before then we should be able to see growing babies or embryos Not all of our seals would necessarily be pregnant so the ultrasound would allow us to tell which females were pregnant and which were not We can estimate how pregnant the seal is by the size of the embryo Larger embryos will be older We can see these embryos just a few days after pregnancy starts The smallest embryo we ve seen was just 3 millimeters in size Using the ultrasound machine we can measure exactly how big the baby is Having the ultrasound machine means that in addition to just looking at how healthy the mom is we can look at how healthy the baby is too As embryos get larger we can see the heartbeat the head and brain and the flippers In some big embryos we can sometimes tell if the baby will be male or female A few of the ultrasound pictures we get back showing very small to large babies Photo credit Shero et al 2015 pictures modified Outcomes and Questions Once we know that a seal is pregnant we can start to look at patterns and ask questions Was it our large females with lots of energy stored as fat that became pregnant Was it the females with low stress levels Which factors are important for whether or not the seal will become pregnant We can then find these exact same seals the next year to see if they were able to keep growing the pregnancy through the harsh Antarctic winter to give birth to a pup the next year Weddell seal pup Photo credit Michelle Shero MMPA

    Original URL path: https://www.polartrec.com/comment/22971 (2016-02-14)
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  • 11 February 2016 Weddell Seal Pregnancy and Gestation | PolarTREC
    Embryonic diapause Photo credit Rose John 2002 In the field So how do we know that a seal is pregnant We can see that a seal is pregnant using an ultrasound machine Ultrasound machine Basically an ultrasound uses sound waves to see inside a body in our case a seal It sends sound waves too high for us to hear into a body The sound hits a surface like tissue bone muscle etc and bounce back like an echo in a cave to produce a picture Doctors often use ultrasounds on pregnant women to monitor the growth of a baby we use it to detect if a seal is pregnant Not very many people know how to do this in wild animals like our seals so the team has had special veterinarians come to Antarctica and they are the experts This is the ultrasound machine we use Photo credit Gregg Adams Advanced technology allowing us to use an ultrasound in the field and even the Antarctic is quite a feat and allows us to see a lot about the seal s pregnancy without disrupting the pregnancy at all The Embryos Now in the January February field season the team comes back to see if the seals we tagged in October November are pregnant So since 1 2 months have gone by and diapause would have ended before then we should be able to see growing babies or embryos Not all of our seals would necessarily be pregnant so the ultrasound would allow us to tell which females were pregnant and which were not We can estimate how pregnant the seal is by the size of the embryo Larger embryos will be older We can see these embryos just a few days after pregnancy starts The smallest embryo we ve seen was just 3 millimeters in size Using the ultrasound machine we can measure exactly how big the baby is Having the ultrasound machine means that in addition to just looking at how healthy the mom is we can look at how healthy the baby is too As embryos get larger we can see the heartbeat the head and brain and the flippers In some big embryos we can sometimes tell if the baby will be male or female A few of the ultrasound pictures we get back showing very small to large babies Photo credit Shero et al 2015 pictures modified Outcomes and Questions Once we know that a seal is pregnant we can start to look at patterns and ask questions Was it our large females with lots of energy stored as fat that became pregnant Was it the females with low stress levels Which factors are important for whether or not the seal will become pregnant We can then find these exact same seals the next year to see if they were able to keep growing the pregnancy through the harsh Antarctic winter to give birth to a pup the next year Weddell seal pup Photo credit Michelle

    Original URL path: https://www.polartrec.com/expeditions/weddell-seals-in-the-ross-sea-2016/journals/2016-02-11 (2016-02-14)
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  • 8 February 2016 Where is Toolik Field Station? | PolarTREC
    findings that result from that work Toolik Field Station is home away from home for Arctic researchers photo Sue Steiner Managed and operated by the Institute for Arctic Biology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Toolik is used by researchers from around the world to better understand the Arctic and especially the rapid changes taking place there Scientists have access to laboratories housing and communication equipment up to 100 researchers and their assistants can be found at Toolik at the height of the summer field season Packing for Toolik will be a challenge for this Southeast Alaskan The summer temperatures there range from 40 70 degrees Fahrenheit and being an Arctic field station snow is possible at any time As with all of Alaska layers are the answer warmth and water proofing are essential and plenty of room in the day pack to store unneeded layers is required as the weather in the Arctic can vary drastically in all seasons As I prepare for my work at Toolik there are many questions I m still asking There are questions for my researchers how will we get there when will we have lab time what exactly are the deep root systems we ll be studying which tools will we use I m curious about what life is like at a bustling field science research center like Toolik which other projects will be there are there opportunities for recreation in the great Alaskan Arctic landscape surrounding the station what is the rhythm of this remote camp Thankfully another PolarTREC teacher with prior experience at Toolik has already informed me the food is both good and abundant and I should plan to gain weight during our field expedition I m already looking forward to the legendary candy wall Photos Comments February 9 2016

    Original URL path: https://www.polartrec.com/comment/22969 (2016-02-14)
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  • 8 February 2016 Where is Toolik Field Station? | PolarTREC
    and the findings that result from that work Toolik Field Station is home away from home for Arctic researchers photo Sue Steiner Managed and operated by the Institute for Arctic Biology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Toolik is used by researchers from around the world to better understand the Arctic and especially the rapid changes taking place there Scientists have access to laboratories housing and communication equipment up to 100 researchers and their assistants can be found at Toolik at the height of the summer field season Packing for Toolik will be a challenge for this Southeast Alaskan The summer temperatures there range from 40 70 degrees Fahrenheit and being an Arctic field station snow is possible at any time As with all of Alaska layers are the answer warmth and water proofing are essential and plenty of room in the day pack to store unneeded layers is required as the weather in the Arctic can vary drastically in all seasons As I prepare for my work at Toolik there are many questions I m still asking There are questions for my researchers how will we get there when will we have lab time what exactly are the deep root systems we ll be studying which tools will we use I m curious about what life is like at a bustling field science research center like Toolik which other projects will be there are there opportunities for recreation in the great Alaskan Arctic landscape surrounding the station what is the rhythm of this remote camp Thankfully another PolarTREC teacher with prior experience at Toolik has already informed me the food is both good and abundant and I should plan to gain weight during our field expedition I m already looking forward to the legendary candy wall Photos Comments February

    Original URL path: https://www.polartrec.com/expeditions/deep-roots/journals/2016-02-08-0 (2016-02-14)
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  • Microbial Changes in Arctic Freshwater 2016 | PolarTREC
    learning standards strengthening science literacy and promoting interest in Read Journal 4 8 February 2016 PolarTREC Orientation Update It is a true honor to have been chosen for the PolarTREC Program I love polar science and the fact that I am able to visit the Arctic is a dream come true I am so excited to be visiting the Toolik Research Field Station in Northern Alaska and working with Dr Kling and Dr Crump on their Microbial Changes in Arctic Freshwaters Project I am looking forward to translating their research and having my 2500 K 12 students participate in my research project Traveling to Alaska was a bit of a long all day trek that included a seven hour layover in Seattle but I am very excited to be with all Read Journal 5 Expedition Resources DJ Kast Research Connection Article Article Arctic Research Connection highlighted Dieuwertje Kast as a STEM Educator and how she is including current research in her classrooms Quote for the Article I love being the STEM translator for researchers she told us in an interview I love seeing what current researchers are working on so that I can bring that into my k 12 classrooms as lessons and inspirations I think it is vital to be able View Article USC Rossier PolarTREC article about DJ Kast Article Arctic Dieuwertje Kast s article about her upcoming PolarTREC expedition Microbial Changes in Arctic Freshwater 2016 was posted USC Rossier School of Education s online news pages View Article Innovative Beyond Their Years and Recognized by Forbes Article Arctic Dieuwertje Kast was nominated for the Forbes 30 under 30 in Science honor and the La Canada Outlook profiled the award and included a 2 paragraph description of her PolarTREC Expedition to the Arctic The paragraph included the following quote Kast is an eager traveler who this summer will join an expedition to the Arctic with the PolarTREC program In the midst of all day daylight she will View Article Project Information Dates 10 June 2016 to 29 August 2016 Location Toolik Field Station AK Project Funded Title NSF LTREB Long Term Research in Environmental Biology What controls long term changes in freshwater microbial community composition Meet the Team STEM Programs Manager DJ Kast University of Southern California Los Angeles CA United States DJ Kast is the STEM Programs Manager for the USC Joint Educational Project which encompasses the USC Young Scientists Program YSP and the USC Wonderkids program She is also the STEM coordinator for the USC Neighborhood Academic Initiative NAI She inspires 2400 K 12 students a year to appreciate science through hands on inquiry based science activities and experiments She received all three of her degrees from the University of Southern California USC and that includes Bachelors in Biology and a minor in Nonprofits Philanthropy and Volunteerism a Masters in Marine Environmental Biology and a Masters in Arts and Teaching with a Single Subject science teaching credential She loves science fashion and wears many science dresses

    Original URL path: https://www.polartrec.com/expeditions/Microbial-Changes-in-Arctic-Freshwater-2016 (2016-02-14)
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