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  • Diversity & inclusion: The female millennial: PwC
    Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites The female millennial A new era of talent The female millennial A new era of talent An overview from Aoife Flood PwC millennial and lead author of the report Watch video Learn about our female millennial career stage differential Global careers A report about the femalemillennial born between 1980 and 1995 Download Organisations the world over are currently facing the challenges that come with vast numbers of millennial talent entering and reshaping the workforce In parallel they are also challenged with a lack of women in leadership positions and fast becoming concerned with the financial and competitive toll this could mean for their organisations Organisations looking to address the gender leadership gap must drive parallel efforts that tackle enhanced leadership diversity in conjunction with systemic change efforts targeting their workforce from day one But to get this right first organisations must better understand how to attract develop engage and retain female millennial talent Our research report The female millennial A new era of talent puts the female millennial front of mind and is based on international research with 10 105 millennial respondents from over 70 countries worldwide 8 756 of whom were female millennials Female millennials are becoming a larger and larger part of the global talent pool and this report makes one thing clear when it comes to the female millennial we really are talking about a new era of female talent Our report shares interesting research results case studies and voice of the female millennial profiles In addition it brings the unique approach of taking a deeper look at the female millennial through the use of a career stage differential Key findings about the femalemillennial The female millennial represents a new era

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/about/diversity/women-at-pwc/internationalwomensday/the-female-millennial.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Developing female leaders: Addressing gender bias in global mobility: PwC
    firms worldwide Live events and discussions Strategy Research insights View featured Browse by issue Browse by industry Browse by service Monthly highlights Spotlight The CEO agenda CEO insights blog Careers About PwC Technology careers Employer of choice Our history PwC Professional Employability Aspire to lead PwC s series on leadership and gender equality Country job search Explore careers with Strategy Press room Facts and figures Press contacts Analyst relations Global International PwC Sites Commonly visited PwC sites Global Australia Brazil Canada China Hong Kong France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Middle East Netherlands Russia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites Developing female leaders Addressing gender bias in global mobility Download In many global organisations international experience is viewed as a pre requisite for executive and leadership roles With just one in four outbound expatriates from Australia being female organisations may unintentionally be limiting the progression of their high potential female employees By exploring and addressing the barriers to female mobility there is an opportunity to enhance both individual careers and organisational performance People and organisation Who we are HR management Talent management Human capital measurement and benchmarking Reward

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/people-organisation/publications/developing-female-leaders.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Diversity findings - 18th Annual Global CEO Survey: PwC
    training into our talent programmes into our succession planning So diversity and inclusion is an integrated component of everything we do around leadership and talent Pekka Lundmark Konecranes Plc Talent diversity and to be able to attract people with multiple talents is an absolute key in the whole digital economy and is also probably our largest single headache Ross McEwan RBS We take our executive team out into our workplaces every second executive meeting so that we re dealing with our customers and our staff where they operate That allows us again to grab some of that diversity of thinking otherwise you do tend to get trapped in your own little world particularly as a senior executive Victor Kislyi Wargaming Public Company Limited For us it s no longer a question this diversity It s our everyday life Denise Ramos ITT Corporation We want people in the company that have differing ideas differing experiences differing opinions because we need to solve our customers problems Diversity and inclusion will make us that much more competitive in the marketplace Roberto Oliveira de Lima Natura Cosméticos SA We need to have ever more people from the most diverse backgrounds as we do not know what area will produce the innovation that will make a difference for us It can be products it can be services it can be forms of communicating with or understanding the customer Dr Vishal Sikka Infosys Design thinking teaches us that great products and solutions come when there is a synthesis of lots of different kinds of perspectives and when we are diverse we create the opportunity for that rich synthesis of great perspectives The more diverse we are the better we will all be Atsushi Saito Japan Exchange Group Inc I think a company will have to embrace various types of people with diversified values in order to be competitive and to survive After all only companies with the ability to adapt will prosper It is the key point for survival next Key findings Talent diversity and inclusiveness are no longer seen as soft issues but rather as crucial competitive capabilities Of the CEOs whose companies have a formal diversity and inclusiveness strategy 85 think it s improved the bottom line And they also see such strategies as benefiting innovation collaboration customer satisfaction emerging customer needs and the ability to benefit technology CEOs are looking for the right mix of talent Having people who can think and work in highly different ways is crucial in a competitive environment where companies need to apply their capabilities in more innovative ways partner successfully and harness technology effectively 81 of CEOs say their organisations are now looking for a much broader range of skills than in the past And to find the skills they need companies are searching in many more places 78 of CEOs say their business always uses multiple channels to recruit while 71 say they actively search for talent in different geographies industries and demographic segments Nurturing adaptable

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/ceo-agenda/ceo-survey/key-findings/diversity.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Family Business Survey 2014: Key priorities for family businesses: PwC
    by industry Browse by service Monthly highlights Spotlight The CEO agenda CEO insights blog Careers About PwC Technology careers Employer of choice Our history PwC Professional Employability Aspire to lead PwC s series on leadership and gender equality Country job search Explore careers with Strategy Press room Facts and figures Press contacts Analyst relations Global International PwC Sites Commonly visited PwC sites Global Australia Brazil Canada China Hong Kong France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Middle East Netherlands Russia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites Up close and professional the family factor tresyt test test test dsfadf test View discussion with Family Business experts Watch here Explore the data Growth succession global trends investigate the hot topics of family business Local insights Select your country of interest What are the key priorities for family business now and in the future Downloads Up close and professional the family factor Our global survey of nearly 2400 family business decision makers in over 40 countries looks at the issues that family businesses are tackling now and in the future Highlights CEO insights blog A sense of belonging learning from the family firm Key findings Survey highlights and important statistics Case studies In depth interviews with family business owners and managers Downloads Read our full report including case studies and global results Professor Peter May A view from a leading German expert The Economist Family firms remain an important part of the global economy Contacts Henrik Steinbrecher Network Middle Market Leader Tel 46 0 10 2133097 Email Family Business Survey 2014 Family Business Survey About the Survey Key findings Local insights Explore the data Download the report Case studies Al Majdouie Group Coopers Brewery Corporación Rey Driscoll Strawberry Associates Inc Extramarks Konfael

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/family-business/family-business-survey.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Key trends in human capital 2014: A new vision for growth: PwC
    on growth But the recovery has brought with it some familiar problems low employee engagement wage inflation in some markets and most importantly skills shortages Many business leaders will say they ve walked this road before that the race to recruit as the recovery takes hold is what organisations need to do But this recovery is unlike any other The rules have changed That means that you need to think again about what you think you know about the behaviour of organisations during a recovery about the nature of emerging markets about workforce management and the role played by diversity and trust even about the impact of HR itself The world has changed and continues to change and that means that the same arguments and approaches no longer apply Five global trends have emerged Break the recovery habit As developed countries emerge from recession organisations are following a habitual pattern when growth returns they rush to recruit PwC s Saratoga data confirms that external recruitment rates are already rising sharply and competition for talent is increasing We could all sit back and watch another talent war unfold or we could choose another path smart growth This means a taking a more strategic approach to recruitment while maximising productivity among existing staff Do more with the same then more with more to maximise the return on investment in human capital Click on a chart or infographic thumbnail to view full size Share Share Think again about emerging markets The temptation for years has been for multinational organisations to think about emerging markets as a single group to which a collective workforce strategy can be applied The reality though is that not all emerging markets have the same workforce concerns Demographic forces and the need to find new ways of competing as the wage gap between developed and emerging markets narrows are creating contrasting priorities A workforce strategy that works in Asia won t necessarily work in Africa Knowledge in the form of analytics will be power Click on a chart or infographic thumbnail to view full size Share Share The real value of diversity Demographic changes mean that workforce diversity will become a necessity rather than an objective over the next few decades It s widely accepted that diversity brings value but there s a vast difference between being a diverse organisation and making diversity work The real value of diversity goes far beyond accessing greater talent supply it comes from harnessing a wider range of perspectives That means thinking beyond gender age and ethnic origin and opening the corporate mind to new ideas Click on a chart or infographic thumbnail to view full size Share The changing nature of trust CEOs agree that trust between employer and employee is critical in building workforce value rebuilding trust has been a priority in recent years The real value in trust comes when it encourages greater innovation where ideas can be tested without fear of failure What we understand as trust though is

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/people-organisation/key-trends-in-human-capital.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Global CEO Survey Themes: Resilience: PwC
    the right place at the right time The war for talent remains both a challenge and a source of continuing uncertainty with 63 of CEOs telling us they are somewhat or extremely concerned about the availability of key skills Yet 61 haven t yet acted on their plans for change The risks you face A drop in the working age population is decreasing the availability of desirable talent An aging workforce presents employers with healthcare benefits and productivity issues The rapid industrialisation of some emerging economies is wooing educated nationals back home leading to rising labour costs for some developed economies Perceived corporate resistance to cultural change can repel desirable younger talent The elimination of jobs by technology creates social risks A growing mismatch of skills needs and location will require considerable adaptability in talent cultures and attitudes as well as government support Resilience practices Use big data and big modelling to understand demographic trends and risks and to identify new sources of labour Adapt Enterprise Risk Management to encompass demographic and other social risks Use technology to reimagine the workplace Technology allows flexibility mobility and virtuality factors that can attract untapped resources and a new generation of workers Follow the talent to new markets or back to old ones Engage with local educational institutions to help nurture the skills and attract the talent of tomorrow Ask yourself Are our ERM processes able to capture changing demographic patterns and measure the risk to our business How effectively could we leverage our governance and controls systems to enable virtual working Does our corporate culture enable employees to develop trusted relationships even across virtual networks As we adopt new virtual cross geographical employment models are we complying with all relevant employment fiscal and immigration laws How well do our corporate values culture and conduct match those of tomorrow s workforce Read more Cultures behaviours Create confidence in your biggest asset Resilience article How can resilience prepare you for environmental and social change Resilience article Tapping into female empowerment PwC s NextGen A global generational study Talent mobility 2020 and beyond Risk resilient or risk resistant to the trends that will transform Fit for the future But are you truly resilient Are you drawing the most innovation from your technology Are you ready for tomorrow s workforce Are you winning and keeping your many consumers trust Are you drawing the most innovation from your technology While four out of five CEOs surveyed ranked technological advances as one of the top three drivers that will transform their business only a quarter 27 said they had actually completed or initiated an innovation focussed change programme What s behind the disconnect Are you ready for tomorrow s workforce It s harder than ever for CEOs to find and keep the right people in the right place at the right time The war for talent remains both a challenge and a source of continuing uncertainty with 63 of CEOs telling us they are concerned about the availability

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/advisory/consulting/risk/resilience/publications/ceo-survey-talent-demographics.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Cities of Opportunity: We the urban people: PwC
    statistics About the Study Downloads Cities of Opportunity 6 The demographic view on 30 world cities Download We the urban people Full report Vital Statistics in images Fact sheets from Cities of Opportunity 6 Exploring the urban demographic megatrend from Cities of Opportunity Demographics are a knowledge tool around which policymakers in business government and education can understand the flow of emerging needs and can develop strategies to advance the well being of urban people and communities Cities of Opportunity 6 We the urban people investigates demographics in 30 of the world s centers of finance commerce and culture We take the shape of city populations and the priorities of city people in the midst of an urban demographic megatrend Cities of Opportunity 6 We the urban people complements our quantitative comparative approach in Cities of Opportunity 6 with an entirely human approach offering a discrete examination of the demographic factors at work in city life ages densities dependencies and even the preferences of people who make cities live today and thrive tomorrow Share Tracking the Arc of Demographics If a great city is an inventory of the possible as René Descartes said about 17th century Amsterdam people themselves give life to a city and turn dreams into possibilities whether schools or businesses parks or theatres roadways or hospitals Demography provides a statistical portrait of the people in fine detail and broader trends on ages densities dependencies and more applying statistics to the study of human population Here we examine the population patterns of the 30 cities included in Cities of Opportunity 6 and take a closer look at two important demographic groups First global cities all require highly skilled working age people to build the future Insight into urban professionals comes from 15 000 at PwC who took five

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/us/en/cities-of-opportunity/urban-demographics.html (2016-02-10)
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  • CEO capabilities: 18th Annual Global CEO Survey: PwC
    leaders must be able to spot the difference between ephemeral demands and structural ones Navigating risky business For many organisations risk management techniques have tended to focus on financial and operational risks But understanding risk appetite and assessing and managing strategic risks will be vital for tomorrow s leaders as they set strategies to realise a future that may look nothing like the past As one CEO sees it they will have to better equip the business to identify risks to strategy and performance and build metrics to measure this and the capacity and systems to manage it Appreciating strategic risks however shouldn t be a constraint on CEOs ability to seize opportunities In a more complex and volatile environment intelligent risk taking is becoming increasingly necessary for success In fact 30 of CEOs in our survey said that there were more threats and more growth opportunities for their company than there were three years ago Future leaders one CEO told us must have the willingness to take risks and capture new opportunities as they appear Indeed if the person in charge cannot take risks asserted another CEO it becomes an obstacle for growth Taking decisions blindfolded With the world evolving at warp speed leaders won t have the luxury of debating their options at length Fast flexible and agile decision making is a must for one CEO For another it s the ability to streamline simplify and shorten the decision making process What adds to the challenge is that CEOs will increasingly have to operate with far from perfect information In some cases they ll have to contend with uncertain unpredictable or conflicting intelligence hence the importance of being able to take decisions in an unsettled environment as one CEO put it In other cases it ll be about the ability to make decisions with insufficient information as another CEO said In yet other cases the information could be subject to different interpretations Situations and markets will be more and more difficult to read and assess said one CEO So decisions will have to be made within a more blurred environment I think it s being able to manage ambiguity well with the opening of economies and diversity of competition there is going to be multiplicity of factors affecting business The CEO needs to be able to focus and build upon certain decisions that he alone is responsible for and develop others to cope with that ambiguity And as competition evolves in sometimes radical ways a key challenge will be navigating in grey areas in the words of one business leader CEOs will increasingly have to make decisions in situations which fall outside known parameters for example where no legislation or precedent exists or cope with ethical and moral dilemmas So how can leaders shorten their reaction times when the volume and nature of the input they have to consider is changing so radically For one CEO it s about the ability to separate real change from temporary hype

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/ceo-agenda/ceo-survey/key-findings/capabilities.html (2016-02-10)
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