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  • Solutions for meeting sustainability and corporate responsibility requirements: PwC
    Browse by industry Browse by service Monthly highlights Spotlight The CEO agenda CEO insights blog Careers About PwC Technology careers Employer of choice Our history PwC Professional Employability Aspire to lead PwC s series on leadership and gender equality Country job search Explore careers with Strategy Press room Facts and figures Press contacts Analyst relations Global International PwC Sites Commonly visited PwC sites Global Australia Brazil Canada China Hong Kong France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Middle East Netherlands Russia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites Sustainability climate change case studies In today s world consumers investors and employees are placing much more scrutiny on companies activities and not just on the everyday business decisions Stakeholders want to know how companies actions impact the environment and the communities in which they operate Governments are concerned about companies sustainable performance too To make sure corporations are practicing sustainable and responsible business operations governments around the world have enacted wide reaching and often complicated policies requiring companies to behave in certain ways So how do companies make sure they re being sustainable and meet stakeholder expectations and complex regulations while remaining competitive The following case studies are real world examples of how we helped clients develop social and environmental strategies responsible investing practices and reporting methods that are transparent and compliant and that deliver value and growth Explore our case studies below to see how we did it Strategic sustainability Assurance reporting Governance risk compliance Supply chain and operations Policy economics Tax the regulatory environment Global Sustainability climate change Strategic sustainability Assurance reporting Governance risk compliance Supply chain operations Policy economics Tax the regulatory environment Water a business risk Water the challenges for business Water successful collaboration Collaboration framework start

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/sustainability/publications/casestudy.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Malcolm Preston
    leadership and gender equality Country job search Explore careers with Strategy Press room Facts and figures Press contacts Analyst relations Global International PwC Sites Commonly visited PwC sites Global Australia Brazil Canada China Hong Kong France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Middle East Netherlands Russia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites Malcolm Preston Partner Global Sustainability leader LinkedIn Twitter Malcolm Preston is the Global Sustainability Leader at PwC leading a 700 strong team of sustainability and climate change experts Malcolm is an expert generalist on numerous sustainability issues but has a particular interest in how companies measure and manage the total impact of their operations in a more holistic manner By valuing social environmental tax and economic impacts he believes business leaders will have more insight to compare the overall impact of their strategies and investment choices and so be able to manage optimise the trade offs a new system for a managing business Sustainability is not an issue that can be managed in isolation Malcolm focusses on ensuring sustainability considerations are embedded through all PwC s services including reporting and assurance complying with regulation and taxes mitigation of and adapting to climate change international development investment decisions and supply chain resilience It also plays a critical role in the trust transparency and reputation agendas Malcolm spends most of his time engaging with the C suite on these issues He is an accomplished speaker most recently speaking at the United Nations MDG Innovation Forum hosted by Ban Ki Moon and at the NY Stock Exchange to launch the 2013 CDP report A graduate in Oceanography Malcolm joined Coopers Lybrand and qualified as a Chartered Accountant in 1986 After spells working in the US Australia and Zambia he became

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/contacts/m/malcolm-preston.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Sustainability contacts
    852 2289 1919 Colombia Juan Malagon Phone 57 301 230 5913 Sergio Salas Phone 57 1 6684999 Ext 139 Andres Romero Phone 57 1 6684999 Ext 137 Cote d Ivoire Edouard Messou Phone 225 20 31 54 12 Czech Republic Jonathan Appleton Phone 420 251 152 015 Costa Rica Claudia Amaya Phone 506 2224 1555 Denmark Anne Louise Thon Schur Phone 4550517630 Ecuador Carlos Zegarra Phone 593 2 3829 330 Estonia Tarmo Meresmaa Phone 372 5819 3443 Finland Sirpa Juutinen Phone 358 40 578 2615 France Sylvain Lambert Phone 33 1 5657 8083 Germany Hendrik Fink Phone 49 89 5790 5535 Ghana Venan Sondo Phone 233 0 302 761 500 Greece Kyriakos Andreou Phone 30 210 6874680 India Sudhir Singh Dungarpur Phone 91 124 330 6006 Indonesia Charles Vincent Phone 62 21 52890872 Ireland Ann O Connell Phone 353 0 1 7928512 Israel Jasmin Kelman Phone 972 3 7954763 Italy Paolo Bersani Phone 39 011 5567773 Japan Masataka Mitsuhashi Phone 81 0 90 8805 7565 Luxembourg Laurent Rouach Phone 352 0 494848 4111 Malaysia Andrew Chan Phone 603 2173 0348 Malta George Sammut Phone 365 2564 7608 Middle East Claire Duce Phone 971 4 304 3346 Mexico Enrique Bertran Phone 52 55 5263 8692 Morocco Christophe Lumsden Phone 212 6 61 08 22 81 The Netherlands Hans Schoolderman Phone 31 0 88 792 76 58 Robert van der Laan Phone 31 0 88 792 14 12 New Zealand Chris Ussher Phone 64 4 462 7107 Nigeria Ifori Layegue Phone 234 1 2711700 Ext 6212 Norway Eli Moe Helgesen Phone 47 952 60 113 Paraguay Ruben Taboada Phone 595 21 445 003 Pakistan Naveed Abdul Hameed Phone 92 21 3242 6462 Peru Humberto Salicetti Phone 51 9892 35115 Philippines Gene Alfred Morales Phone 63 2 8452728 Poland Anna Szlachta Phone 48

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/sustainability/contacts.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Creating insight: navigating the global goals: PwC
    Creating insight navigating the global goals We believe that the Global Goals are a game changer for the planet But only if the business community seizes the opportunity and engages governments NGOs and society can only do so much but it will take a united effort with business on board as well for the goals to be achieved Our research Make it your business Engaging with the Sustainable Development Goals reveals that just 13 of the companies surveyed have identified the tools that will help them assess their impact against the Global Goals that are relevant to their business This is understandable considering the newness of them but even in five years only 30 think they will have We recognise that engagement will be slow without the basic tools in place to start the process So with a focus on two early priorities we have developed a diagnostic tool which will give businesses a quick replicable and low cost way to identify the Global Goals that are of most relevance given their countries and sectors of operation evaluate which Global Goals they can best contribute to identify the significant risks i e where business activities could hinder governments more than help in relation both to core products and activities and more broadly across the supply chain on a country by country basis identify the potential opportunities i e where business activities could help significantly more in relation to core products and activities and the wider supply chain on a country by country basis Business navigator overview The Global Goals Business Navigator combines our market leading Total Impact Measurement and Management framework understanding social economic and environmental impacts of a business with detailed understanding of the targets and indicators that underpin the Global Goals In this way we aim to help

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/sustainability/sustainable-development-goals/navigating-global-goals.html (2016-02-10)
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  • SDG Business Challenge: are you ready to take it?
    2015 In this vision for 2030 business activity is goal congruent with government targets to achieve the Global Goals As a result no one now lives in extreme poverty there is decent work for all economic prosperity is better shared our environment is respected and protected and much more It could start with one conversation Forward thinking CEOs will want to understand their business impact on the Global Goals and act on the insight so it s a conversation that needs to happen at the Board It s a conversation that will drive change so the right people need to be in the room What s the challenge Supporting you to rise to the challenge What s does a good Board discussion look like And the winner is Why do SDGs matter to business The Global Goals are complex and so is your business Where to start is a question we hear a lot But pressure to engage will only increase over time pressure from your customers your buyers and the governments of the countries you operate within All will want you to evidence how you help or hinder the achievement of the Global Goals and hear what you re doing about them So the Global Goals Commonwealth Sustainable Business Challenge could be the catalyst you re looking for Your business impact on the Global Goals could shape its long term strategy support your dialogue with your stakeholders and help to maintain or secure your licence to operate They are also a new framework to identify opportunities perhaps in new markets or create a demand for new or alternative products and to expose risks too But when your strategy is so important to the achievement of the Global Goals what is your Board thinking about them A robust Board discussion on Global Goals is the first step to defining strategy and making change happen Tapping into practical advice We are running the Business Challenge in partnership with the Commonwealth Enterprise and Investment Council We want you to sign up and are here to offer additional advice and support You ll find great content here to get you started on your journey to engage with the Global Goals and drive your Board discussion We have a tool kit to help your business understand how its activities impact on the Global Goals to give you the insight to manage your impact The Global Goals Business Navigator looks at your current business strategy and immediate impact helps identify future opportunities and highlights how you align to government Global Goals targets of the countries in which you operate We can also offer support to structure your thinking ahead of the Board meeting one to one guidance and even facilitate your board discussion with you PwC understands Global Goals and with our years of working with business we know how Boards operate We have the breadth of skills and a diagnostic tool kit to support you I want to know more about how PwC can

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/sustainability/sustainable-development-goals/global-goals-business-challenge.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Water collaboration: start off on the right foot: PwC
    and the outcomes The Problem Click to see the full collaboration framework Find out how to start off on the right foot A range of common and different reasons brought the Forum together frustration with costly time consuming and divisive planning and consenting processes concern over declining water quality lack of recognition in water management of Maori aspirations about their rights and interests an inability to enhance and get better economic value out of fresh water that was becoming increasingly scarce in places concern at the lack of effective central government direction and guidance They were aware that other countries had used collaborative processes in similar circumstances to great effect They were also aware that collaborative processes were being used in a variety of local contexts in New Zealand The forum resolved to work together collaboratively for the first time at the national level to find ways to address New Zealand s water management issues Stakeholders The Land and Water Forum brings together a range of industry groups environmental and recreational NGOs Maori scientists and other organisations with a stake in freshwater and land management The Forum s members are joined by active observers from local and central government The Forum s objective is to develop a shared vision and a common way through a stakeholder led collaborative process The Government supported this process in its efforts to develop a roadmap for freshwater reform that reflected the views and had the buy in of all main interested parties Observers from both local and central government joined the Forum and its work programme was formally built into the Government s freshwater policy programme How did they collaborate to address this challenge With the Government s support over a one year period from August 2009 to August 2010 the Forum succeeded in building a broad base of stakeholder consensus on a common direction forward for freshwater management This was a goal that governments following a more conventional approach to policy development had been trying but failing to address since the mid 1990s The Forum then toured that consensus position around the country and found it to be generally well received The release of the Forum s first report in 2010 paved the way for the Government to take much needed and overdue action to improve freshwater management The release of the report was swiftly followed by the release in 2011 of a National Policy Statement on Freshwater Management and the creation of two multimillion dollar funds one to support the development of high quality irrigation infrastructure and the second to accelerate environmental restoration The Government then requested that the Forum continue its consensus building work and again with the support of the Government the Forum developed the blueprint for change set out in the first report into a more detailed and thorough freshwater management framework In 2012 the Forum released a second report that addressed the setting of objectives and limits for freshwater quality and quantity and proposed the introduction of collaborative

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/sustainability/publications/collaboration-start-on-right-foot.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Water collaboration: get the system going: PwC
    sites are in both rural and urban locations which present varied technical constraints and requirements for any watershed programme The Problem Click to see the full collaboration framework Find out how to get the system going At these sites the company sources water from both surface and groundwater supplies The company found it difficult to choose from an inventory of 130 watershed interventions that are used globally Each Indian state has its own water regulations so the company had to deal with over 50 different regulations for its operations in India The company found it difficult to communicate the results of its water replenishment programmes to local authorities as there was no commonly agreed means of quantifying the results Being a beverage manufacturing company the company also had to manage its reputation amongst the local communities and protect itself from controversy from activist groups The stakeholders Employees at the company plant locations and external subject matter experts Hydrology GIS were involved to undertake technical and social assessment and led watershed engagements in their local area As the integrated watershed management programme was rolled out across the different sites Local NGOs were engaged as implementation partners for the identified interventions Local communities were involved in joint ownership and sharing of resources required to undertake interventions outside the company s plant boundary Critical Government Departments Agencies related to land and water resources shared technical studies and their organisational capabilities in the local watershed for joint activities How did they collaborate to address the challenge Engaging various stakeholders on a common platform was a major challenge So the company developed a water management programme which was built on three building blocks a A programmatic approach based on sound technical social assessments and regulatory review This allowed the company a standardization of process in areas with different technical social and regulatory requirements It provided a consistent message to engage various stakeholders e g government and local communities b Preference to partnerships in implementation A preference to partner with government led watershed management initiatives helped to communicate a commitment on the part of the company towards its local watershed and removed any skepticism that might have existed c Wide stakeholder engagements This ensured that interventions were made only after wide consultation with local communities Impacts and Outcomes The company s framework is currently being piloted at two sites where the water levels have being declared critical The framework activities have for the first time received proactive support from the regulatory authorities State watershed management authorities have expressed eagerness to partner as per the recommendations stated in the framework On successful completion of the pilot the company is expected to achieve Identification of site specific replenishment targets with related regulatory requirements Identified intervention with buy in from concerned stakeholders to safely return to communities and nature an amount of water equivalent to what they use in all their beverages and their production Complete stakeholder mapping and engagement during development and implementation of the Projects and communication

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/sustainability/publications/collaboration-get-system-going.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Water collaboration: strengthen the glue: PwC
    that works There is one for each step of the Collaboration Framework Click on the step you would like to find out more about to read the supporting case study Start off on the right foot Get the system going Strengthen the glue Maintain momentum Cotton is one of the most important cash crops in the world and despite the development of synthetics cotton remains one of the most important fibres India is the second largest producer of cotton globally But cotton is one of the most water consuming crops because of the frequent flood irrigation needed in its production The Problem Click to see the full collaboration framework Find out how to strengthen the glue If flood irrigation is replaced by drip micro irrigation systems MIS water consumption can be reduced by as much as 50 The adoption of MIS by Indian cotton farmers had for a long time been limited So the challenge was to increase adoption of MIS by cotton farmers in India The stakeholders The stakeholders in this challenge The farmers themselves as individuals and as groups communities The textile furnishing brands selling cotton based products in the global markets International developmental institutes MIS companies Financial institutions that fund finance the procurement of MIS equipment by farmers Cotton value chain players i e the ginners spinners traders etc The Governments local and national were interested as declining fresh water availability is a national as well as local concern NGOs and other not for profit organisations that work with the farmers on various issues How did they collaborate to address the challenge First they identified the key reasons for the low adoption rate by conducting a study to establish farmers understanding of the relevance of MIS systems in the cotton value chain The key findings of the study were Cost of irrigation was 20 of total cost of cultivation Irrigated farms showed 3 times the amount of profit as compared to a non irrigated farm Drip irrigation was considered as one of the key measures for sustainably growing cotton in the future The awareness of the farmers about the benefits of MIS was very high The low adoption rate was driven by a lack of financial resources The next stage was to develop the access to finance projects that would enable farmers to adopt the MIS systems Impacts and Outcomes In the pilot areas 300 farmers were given access to finance through support from regional NGOs throughout the borrowing process Banks supported the project pre sanctioned the loans and helped fast track the lending process The banks also provided lower rates of interest compared to regular loans reduced margin and security requirements and reduced the documentation requirements for the farmers In a drought year when the sales of MIS systems declined in the pilot area the sales levels were sustained Enablers What helped the collaboration work well The team provided by PwC was multi disciplinary and had expertise in agricultural issues technical knowledge of MIS systems and

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/sustainability/publications/collaboration-strengthen-the-glue.html (2016-02-10)
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