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    Corporate responsibility Network governance Our contribution to the debate Genesis Park Diversity and inclusion Analyst relations Alumni Member firms worldwide Live events and discussions Strategy Research insights View featured Browse by issue Browse by industry Browse by service Monthly highlights Spotlight The CEO agenda CEO insights blog Careers About PwC Technology careers Employer of choice Our history PwC Professional Employability Aspire to lead PwC s series on leadership and gender

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/content/pwc/global/forms/contactUs.en_gx.html?parentPagePath=/content/pwc/gx/en/contacts/p/peter-cullen&contactLink=/content/pwc/gx/en/contacts/p/peter-%0A%0Acullen&style=pwc&territory=gx (2016-02-10)
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  • The wearable technology future - Consumer Intelligence Series: PwC
    global site Press room Video library Careers PwC Open University United States International PwC Sites Commonly visited PwC sites Global Australia Brazil Canada China Hong Kong France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Middle East Netherlands Russia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites Consumer Intelligence Series The wearable technology future October 2014 At a glance Download The Wearable Future PwC s research digs into the business of wearables and the consumer attitudes and preferences that will shape the future of wearable technology Download Health wearables Early days Close Close Close Close Spotlight on the Wearable Future There is indeed a wearable future ahead one that can dramatically alter the landscape of society and business as we know it For months we surveyed consumers and spoke with experts to explore the potential benefits as well as drawbacks understading why they matter and how they will deeply shape us as individuals and as a society Here is a look at some of the strengths and opportunities for wearable tech and the weaknesses and challenges that enterprising businesses must successfully navigate About the Consumer Intelligence Series Consumer Intelligence Series now in its 7th year is PwC s ongoing consumer focused research through which we gain directional insights on consumer attitudes and behaviors in the rapidly changing media and technology landscape Our findings reflect the intersection between an online survey to over 1 000 respondents a series of focus groups immersion sessions with industry specialists and an online listening campaign Visit the Consumer Intelligence Series archive page for more issues Industry sectors Entertainment Media Revenue recognition Enhancing mobile advertising New business models Sustainable cost reduction Doing business globally IFRS transition Mergers acquisitions Tax strategies Global outlook Filmed entertainment Music TV subscriptions Advertising Publications

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/us/en/industry/entertainment-media/publications/consumer-intelligence-series/wearable-technology.html (2016-02-10)
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    Central Americas Central Asia and Caucasus Central and Eastern Europe Chad Channel Islands Chile China Colombia Comoros Congo Brazzaville Congo Dem Rep Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Côte d Ivoire Denmark Djibouti Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equitorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Fiji Finland France French Polynesia Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Global Greece Greenland Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea Bissau Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Interaméricas Iraq Ireland Republic of Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Middle East Region Moldova Monaco Principality of Mongolia Montenegro Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Norway Oman PRTM Japan Pakistan Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico PwC Tax and Legal Services Qatar Remediation Romania Russia Rwanda San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea Spain Sri Lanka St Lucia St Kitts and Nevis Sudan Surinam Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Taiwan Tajikistan

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/content/pwc/global/forms/contactUs.en_gx.html?parentPagePath=/content/pwc/gx/en/services/people-organisation/publications/people-%0A%0Astrategy&contactLink=/content/pwc/gx/en/contacts/j/jon-andrews&style=pwc&territory=gx (2016-02-10)
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  • PwC Global Economic Crime 2014 Survey: Fraud Detection and Data Analytics
    View featured Browse by issue Browse by industry Browse by service Monthly highlights Spotlight The CEO agenda CEO insights blog Careers About PwC Technology careers Employer of choice Our history PwC Professional Employability Aspire to lead PwC s series on leadership and gender equality Country job search Explore careers with Strategy Press room Facts and figures Press contacts Analyst relations Global International PwC Sites Commonly visited PwC sites Global Australia Brazil Canada China Hong Kong France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Middle East Netherlands Russia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites Detecting fraud The rise of data analytics So how do you stop an economic crime in progress or better yet before it happens Methods of fraud detection usually fall into one of three categories corporate controls corporate culture or beyond corporate control The figure below displays how the major fraud at responding organisations was detected Share Note that the percentage of fraud detected through suspicious transaction reporting and data analytics increased by over one third from 18 to 25 Moving forward we expect more organisations to build on this success story and use leading data analysis tools to help detect and mitigate fraud The Enemy Hiding in Plain Sight Practitioners commonly refer to a Fraud Triangle the three elements that are often present when a perpetrator commits fraud pressure opportunity and rationalisation Three quarters 73 of our respondents indicated that the opportunity or ability to commit the crime was the factor that most contributed to economic crime by an internal fraudster Of the three factors opportunity is the one most within an organisation s control While life s pressures and the ability to rationalise may swirl around employees if an organisation can limit the opportunity they may

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/advisory/consulting/forensics/economic-crime-survey/perpetrator/catch-a-thief.html (2016-02-10)
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  • 10Minutes on the stark realities of cybersecurity: PwC
    Services Institute Technology Institute Health Research Institute Center for Board Governance PwC s Investor Resource Institute Point of view View CFOdirect About us Alumni Alliances Awards Corporate responsibility Diversity Our global site Press room Video library Careers PwC Open University United States International PwC Sites Commonly visited PwC sites Global Australia Brazil Canada China Hong Kong France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Middle East Netherlands Russia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites 10Minutes on the stark realities of cybersecurity April 2013 At a glance This 10Minutes discusses why cybersecurity is more than an IT challenge it s a business imperative New technologies well funded and determined adversaries and interconnected business ecosystems have combined to increase your company s exposure to cyberattacks Critical digital assets are being targeted and the potential impact to your business has never been greater In order to sufficiently protect the business future cash flows and shareholder value your approach to cybersecurity must keep pace Download 10Minutes on the stark realities of cybersecurity Create custom report Download chart pack Download the iBook for your iPad Businesses that are adapting to the new reality are reconsidering the scope of the challenge re evaluating ownership and accountability for cybersecurity understanding the motive means and methods of their adversaries protecting the information that really matters to the business collaborating and sharing information in order to have the best available knowledge about the ever changing threats When you can do this successfully you do more than protect the business you reap bottom line benefits A historic release of cyber indicators This is your chance Cybersecurity and Corporate America 2013 US CEO Survey Cybersecurity 10Minutes current topics 10Minutes App About the 10Minutes program Upcoming 10Minutes topics We d like to

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/us/en/10minutes/cybersecurity-realities.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Key findings: 2015 Global Digital IQ Survey: PwC
    by issue Browse by industry Browse by service Monthly highlights Spotlight The CEO agenda CEO insights blog Careers About PwC Technology careers Employer of choice Our history PwC Professional Employability Aspire to lead PwC s series on leadership and gender equality Country job search Explore careers with Strategy Press room Facts and figures Press contacts Analyst relations Global International PwC Sites Commonly visited PwC sites Global Australia Brazil Canada China Hong Kong France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Middle East Netherlands Russia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites Key findings The 2015 Digital IQ Survey identified 10 critical capabilities that correlate with stronger financial performance Those organisations that embraced these attributes our Digital IQ leaders were twice as likely to achieve more rapid revenue and profit growth as the laggards in our study Digital trends and barriers In addition to establishing the direct linkage between digital investment and corporate performance our research revealed important trends about the nature of disruption and the barriers organisations face in its wake 1 Digital for today s business not tomorrow s Despite the market fervor companies are not investing in technology to disrupt their own or other industries They are almost entirely focused on applying digital to grow their existing business models and the short sighted view is cause for concern 2 Yet plenty of disruption inside of organisations Leadership s desire to capitalise on digital technology is so strong that it s disrupting the enterprise operating model as evidenced by shifting spending patterns new digital roles and undefined working relationships 3 And companies are held back by a slow tech approach Staying ahead of both market and internal disruption requires thinking and acting more like a nimble startup Companies need to

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/advisory/2015-global-digital-iq-survey/key-findings.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Tax Transparency, Total Tax Contribution and Effective Tax Rates: PwC
    country basis So companies headquartered in an EU Member State and international groups with a presence in a European Member State may be required to make country by country disclosures of some description Is your company required to make such disclosures or will it be required to do so in the coming years Are your IT systems ready and able to help you do this Will you have sufficient confidence in the numbers Do you have a communications strategy in place Tax transparency framework Building trust enhancing reputation Building public trust is a priority for companies aiming to increase their resilience in a turbulent world Clear communication around tax is one way to help this They need to be accurate clear and relevant They should explain a company s approach to tax the risks it faces and the controls in place to manage them They should use plain language that non experts can understand with an ability to explain the reasons why a current tax charge is not simply the accounting profit at the statutory rate They should look to show the bigger picture beyond traditional disclosures and perhaps go wider than tax Over recent years there s been a steady increase in the number of companies that see reputational value in discussing their tax affairs in a more engaging way In consultation with businesses and stakeholders we developed a framework the Tax Transparency Framework The Framework can help you to develop your thinking around tax transparency and how to communicate your company s tax position with clear and meaningful information which addresses your external stakeholders needs The Tax Transparency Framework looks at potential disclosures in three areas tax strategy and risk management tax numbers and performance and the total tax contribution and the wider impact of taxes Tax transparency is not about providing additional technical detail on numbers and performance Rather it requires a broader look at tax strategy risk management and the wider impact of tax as well as greater focus on clarity We can help you to provide that clarity to your stakeholders Total Tax Contribution Corporate income tax is just one element of the contribution made to the public finances by business But these are the taxes that land in the spotlight most often Companies pay many other types of taxes in addition to corporate income tax but there s often little visibility of these other business taxes in a company s statutory accounts And businesses collect and administer many more taxes on behalf of others As well as being a powerful management tool having a clear understanding of your Total Tax Contribution can help your business make better informed decisions with an ability to manage tax risk more effectively Together with social economic and environmental factors the Total Tax Contribution made to public finances is an essential part of your total impact on the society in which you operate Our Total Tax Contribution TTC framework provides a methodology to help your company identify the full

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/tax/tax-policy-administration/tax-policy-experience/tax-transparency.html (2016-02-10)
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  • BEPS Action Plan: Action 1 - The digital economy: PwC
    23 April in Paris and there is now a consensus at the highest levels that in the current tax debate there is no separate digital economy but rather a digitising economy It fits well with our thoughts on the fact that what organisations need is a business strategy fit for the digital age rather than a digital strategy Agreement is still likely to prove difficult to reach on the actions needed to tackle the resulting tax challenges Some stakeholders appear to be tending toward the view that the issues are best dealt with by the working parties addressing other items within the BEPS Action Plan Other stakeholders seem to want to pick out particular ways of doing business digitally and create tax solutions to the perceived problems which this creates In a discussion paper published in mid March the OECD governmental working party focusing on the digital challenges set out a mixture of approaches to dealing with this Those included firstly modifying the permanent establishment PE definition to bring direct tax into play more easily secondly using VAT instead but in a way that would mean the corporate bears some of the tax or thirdly devising alternative taxes Apart from a withholding tax some of the novel suggestions for new taxes included a bandwidth tax or possibly trying to value and tax data collection At this moment in time the final recommendations could include a mix of some or all of these The biggest difference in views is probably around whether data has value or not Going down this route creates a whole new way of measuring and taxing business activities What lies behind it seems to be an attempt to find a way to tax the monetisation of business activities where that monetisation comes from someone other than the apparent consumer e g advertising revenue The other areas of disagreement are more about how to apply the existing rules e g where is the permanent establishment PE threshold and how to make sure transfer pricing is appropriate than fundamental differences of view There are some interesting contrasts between the ways that the some countries consider the appropriate use of controlled foreign company CFC rules and indirect taxes in the digital area There have been some keen discussions about VAT and whether it should not be seen where it is applied to digital services as more of a sales tax Where pricing is not fully elastic the VAT becomes effectively a profits tax on the gross revenues In any event it was clear that politically any thought that VAT should replace direct tax would not be accepted by governments Overall a sensible approach expressed most clearly by the business and industry advisory committee BIAC suggests waiting to see what the other working parties recommend and whether there are any residual issues which need to be dealt with At that point it would be sensible to debate other tax approaches 16 April 2014 The OECD has now published our submission alongside 59 other responses in a 463 page consolidated document available on the OECD s website from a dedicated page 15 April 2014 In our submission to the OECD we welcome the growing consensus reflected in the Discussion Draft that the digital economy cannot be ring fenced from the rest of the economy and that businesses should not be subject to a different set of rules of taxation simply by reason of the use of information and communications technology ICT We fully endorse this principle of neutrality In that regard the Ottawa Taxation Framework principles are still relevant today and should constitute the basis to evaluate options to address the tax challenges of the digital economy The Discussion Draft provides a good background summary concerning the development and widespread use of ICT and shows that nearly all sectors of the economy rely on advances in ICT to deliver their products and services digital or otherwise It seems to us that where the Discussion Draft speaks of a digital business it is referring to businesses which make more extensive use of ICT i e any difference between a digital versus other business is a quantitative difference in the use of ICT not qualitative Therefore because the rest of the economy cannot be separated from the digital economy any option for addressing digital economy tax challenges should consider not only neutrality but also should avoid creating unintended collateral consequences for the rest of the economy We recognise that the BEPS Action on the digital economy is driven by a concern as to whether existing international tax rules have kept pace with emerging new business models enabled by the rapid development of ICT However we caution that these concerns should not lead to the discarding of long established principles of international taxation on which there is international consensus OECD treaties are valuable to support and encourage trade in goods and services Any perceived concerns with and any potential changes resulting from the work on the digital economy should neither endanger this nor stifle innovation and the continued use of ICT which increases both business efficiency and productivity 26 March 2014 The D iscussion Draft released by the OECD on 24 March 2014 confirms the view that tax measures designed exclusively for the digital economy are likely to prove problematic primarily because of the difficulties in identifying a specific digital sector Rather the potential use of modern information and communications technology by all businesses seems to raise digital tax issues Nonetheless the OECD clearly believes that the perceived weaknesses in the territorial tax system and the international tax rules as a whole as require change in the tax rules in order to cope with modern business practices Click here to read our Tax Policy Bulletin on this Discussion Draft 21 February 2014 The OECD has published dates for the release of a Discussion Draft of its report under Action 1 for the deadline for responses and for a public consultation meeting and while it s

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/tax/tax-policy-administration/beps/the-digital-economy.html (2016-02-10)
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