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  • Public Sector Research Centre: Future of Government: PwC
    the debate Genesis Park Diversity and inclusion Analyst relations Alumni Member firms worldwide Live events and discussions Strategy Research insights View featured Browse by issue Browse by industry Browse by service Monthly highlights Spotlight The CEO agenda CEO insights blog Careers About PwC Technology careers Employer of choice Our history PwC Professional Employability Aspire to lead PwC s series on leadership and gender equality Country job search Explore careers with Strategy Press room Facts and figures Press contacts Analyst relations Global International PwC Sites Commonly visited PwC sites Global Australia Brazil Canada China Hong Kong France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Middle East Netherlands Russia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites Future of Government Download Delivering on the Citizen Promise In the face of recurrent budget cuts to reduce fiscal deficits in many countries affordable government has become the watchword This means doing more for less meeting rising citizens expectations by doing things differently to deliver services more effectively and efficiently Where Next for public services Public sector organisations need to re evaluate their purpose and role and decide if current visions and missions and ways of operating to achieve them are relevant enough to ride the waves of these shifts or be overwhelmed by them Government and public sector organisations will also need to respond to these shifts proactively and pre emptively to avoid falling one or more steps behind What guides and shapes the future public body As such tomorrow s public bodies need to navigate themselves by first formulating a strong and clear vision and mission Together these will capture the organisation s strategic ambition and purpose and serve to influence decisions and behavior within the organisation Public sector research centre Rethinking government Government and

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/industries/government-public-services/public-sector-research-centre/publications/future-of-government.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Public Sector Research Centre: Global IPSAS Survey − Government accounting and reporting : PwC
    worldwide Live events and discussions Strategy Research insights View featured Browse by issue Browse by industry Browse by service Monthly highlights Spotlight The CEO agenda CEO insights blog Careers About PwC Technology careers Employer of choice Our history PwC Professional Employability Aspire to lead PwC s series on leadership and gender equality Country job search Explore careers with Strategy Press room Facts and figures Press contacts Analyst relations Global International PwC Sites Commonly visited PwC sites Global Australia Brazil Canada China Hong Kong France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Middle East Netherlands Russia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites Global IPSAS survey Towards a new era in government accounting and reporting Download Towards a new era in government accounting and reporting PwC Global survey on accounting and reporting by central governments 2nd edition The PwC global survey analyses key aspects of government accounting and financial reporting in terms of three themes Government accounting and financial reporting today and tomorrow The dynamic for accrual accounting To establish a baseline understanding of current government accounting and reporting rules as well as budgetary and auditing practices and show the trends in terms of reform initiatives that are currently in progress around the world Making the transition to accrual accounting benefits and challenges To understand the impact on governments of the transition or possible transition to accrual accounting standards based on IPSAS or equivalent and learn more about the resulting benefits and challenges The future of the government finance function To put government accounting in the context of the wider finance function and evaluate governments performance in various aspects of financial management and get insight into how governments envision moving this forward Public sector research centre Rethinking government Government and the economy

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/industries/government-public-services/public-sector-research-centre/publications/government-accounting-and-reporting-pwc-global-ipsas-survey.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Government and the 19th Annual Global CEO Survey: PwC
    Firstly quality of life our canton offers proximity to nature land for building on infrastructure security peace and quiet urban amenities beautiful views and rapid transport connections all at a very reasonable price You can be at the heart of things here without having to live in the city centre Quality of life like that can t be measured but it creates confidence in society The second added value could be described as life assurance for Switzerland Of course we need financial centres like Zurich Geneva or Basel which focus on monetary targets But who s to say what we will need in 30 or even 60 years The Canton of Bern with its beautiful scenery is not only a very diverse region but also has some interesting agricultural potential One day this could be hugely important if food supplies were suddenly to become more scarce Nitin Singh Bhadauria Nitin Bhadauria Commissioner Municipal Corporation of Dehradun What mega trends 1 and threats are most influencing your organisation I consider the following mega trends and threats are influencing the mandate and functioning of my organisation Financial Constraints Limited financial resources and overdependence on the state as local taxes are hived off to other departments is making local government heavily reliant on the state largesse Lack of budgeting and a planned approach also means that immediate issues are addressed first while important issues and expenditures might take a backseat Limited Decentralisation and Devolution of powers The decentralisation of decision making has not happened at local levels which is not only against the spirit of the local governance but seriously hinders local government functioning While autonomy remains the prized goal the lack of approvals by the relevant monitoring government departments creates delays and at times hinders the implementation of the agenda for local government Rapid Urbanisation and Citizen Activism As citizens become more and more empowered and aware entitlements will get transformed into rights and vice versa These are the changes which hard pressed under resourced Municipal organisations will find most difficult to address Under capacity and an unskilled workforce It becomes paramount that the needs of the citizens are addressed at the earliest point However an ill trained workforce with low motivation levels which is designed to fit the work profile of yesteryear becomes a key issue Also staff shortages to the tune of 75 hinders delivery The right balance of power between political representatives and permanent bureaucracy There is a need to have the right balance of power between the two arms of government executive and political If this is tilted or inclined in favour of either this can be disadvantageous to citizens in terms of efficient and effective delivery of services In what ways do you think these trends will change society s expectations of your organisation and its purpose role Organisations will be pushed to provide services that the society expects of them or they will perish Technology will be a major game changer in the coming decade as it will help handle the same volume of work more effectively and efficiently to cater to the needs of an ever growing population The rising burden of non productive expenditure such as pensions will be a new reality that government organisations in India will have to contend with The government including Municipal organizations will have to identify and devise innovative ways of generating revenues to cater to such needs I also see the risk of the demographic dividend getting eroded if as government we do not take necessary steps to convert current growth into tangible employment and business opportunities for citizens How are you engaging your internal and external stakeholders in your decision making In Municipal Corporations in India the emphasis is on a bottom up planning approach i e consultations are held at grassroots levels namely the wards or the resident welfare associations These get integrated into an overall plan of activities to be carried out by the Municipality However at times pressing and urgent works take precedence over planned work Multiple stakeholder consultations are held on a regular basis to ensure that citizens are involved in every aspect Feedback mechanisms through websites and other portals such as a specialised Solid Waste Management Helpline and Street Light Helpline help us resolve regular complaints in a timely manner A plan is also underway to link the online mechanisms with Common Service Centres located in different parts of Dehradun where a citizen can register his her grievance and share ideas which will be utilised in the development of the city What role will technology play in building connectivity increasing productivity and enabling the changes you foresee We need to understand that technology has arrived in the public sector and if we as government do not acknowledge or accept this change we will be left behind in the evolution of society There is a major role which I see that technology can play in every sphere of life and not just productivity and connectivity With democracy reaching the grassroots the involvement of citizens to solve their local problems will become more essential In this context the use of technology can prove to be a boon to local authorities for citizen engagement The tertiary benefits will include funds being better utilised the citizen having a greater say in governance and larger gains in employee productivity What barriers are you encountering when executing your strategy and aligning the organisation to its purpose The lack of funds and lack of skilled manpower to execute change inertia to resist change and long drawn out government processes are some of the barriers that we are facing How can business and government co create more value for society Business and Government are locked in a symbiotic relationship The government s job is to ensure that the right environment is provided to businesses so that they have a holistic environment to work in whereas businesses in turn should create more value for society A symbiotic relationship can work only if there is trust on both the sides The business side should ensure that it is providing the best services in the interest of the society something similar to what some of the big corporates such as Tata group are doing Also the business government relationship should create confidence in the minds of the citizens Communication should be so strong that the mere association of the Government and the business group will ensure that they will add value to the lives of people This relationship also needs to be audited and monitored by an independent third party in order to ensure that both the parties involved do not take the citizens for a ride What are the key challenges and opportunities to create stronger partnerships and trust between business and government In India the regulatory framework is strong but implementation of plans and projects leaves a lot to be desired Non penal action against defaulting agencies questions the very foundation of the rule of law based on an archaic legal system with no quick or time bound solutions The profit motivation of the private sector should be in line with the societal interests In order to create partnerships and trust between the two parties there are two imperatives The private sector should shed its only profit motivation and give greater importance to what they can do for society while Governments should give greater leeway for factoring profits when sanctioning projects The dispute redressal mechanism should be made stronger and time bound What do you think should be the measures of success for a modern public body There can be no one criterion of success for a modern public body since it is involved in multifarious activities It can only be judged by the value it creates for its citizens While Profits Dividends and P E ratios can serve as indicators for the performance of a company there are no such criteria for the Municipal Corporations A Municipal Body might be rated say AAA by CRISIL but if it fails to take up any development works in the name of financial prudence it is not creating any value for its citizens In what areas do you think your organisation should be doing more to measure and communicate impact and value A Municipal Organisation s direct interaction with the citizen is through delivery of services at grassroots levels and indirect communication is via media The media in today s world is a very interesting and independent medium with an ever increasing role in the public debate The media s analysis of a situation is different as they share a perspective different from that of our organisation Being a public organisation we try and share all that we do with the media for their assessment We also use our website and Facebook pages to interact positively with the citizens Having a media management department who can clearly communicate the organisation s objective and perspective is paramount in today s world which our organisation is lacking currently Finally what does your organisation bring to society which is not currently measured or is measured but not fully appreciated Well we provide essential services in an area where provision of services is not fully appreciated but the lack of the same creates issues As a customer of the government our citizens are only concerned about the end product which is fair and we need to upscale our functioning to be able to cater to these expectations I believe that wholesome appreciation will follow once we can provide world class services to our citizens 1 Demographic shifts Technological advances Resource scarcity and climate change Shift in global economic power Urbanisation Augustinus Katiti Augustinus Katiti CEO Namibia Institute of Pathology What is the purpose of your organisation today Our primary purpose is to provide affordable and accessible medical diagnostic services to public and private health sectors NIP is the only service provider mandated to deal with public health sector pathology testing and provides an extensive array of disease monitoring services Most of our revenue is therefore derived from state hospitals as we dominate both volume and market share in the public healthcare sector Who are your key stakeholders Our main stakeholder and regulator is government through the Ministry of Health and Social Services Employees are a key stakeholder as they are highly skilled and are quite scarce Society and environment are also other important stakeholders How do you think global trends and evolving societal expectations will impact your strategy The world has become a global village through the ease of travel which makes the spreading of potentially infectious diseases much easier We therefore have to be ready for different types of tests and the prevention of aggressive pathogens Our work will be more preventative more frequent with more self testing and more points of care health care centres where nurses could detect the symptoms and perform tests that will be offered by NIP Tests aimed at early detection of abnormal conditions should be promoted through awareness creation and education taking away the fear people have towards tests Is there clarity on the continuing purpose for state ownership of your organisation There is a clear regulatory ownership by the state through 100 equity holding in NIP That does not however prevent us entering into partnerships with private institutions There is a high number of SOEs performing and succeeding Those that do not perform or are not successful one should look at the underlying reasons that make them fail In most cases its lack of leadership at the level of the board of directors and or support from the relevant line minister I support a dual reporting system that would enable the Ministry of Public Enterprises to assume responsibility over governance aspects while the Ministry of Health and Social Services would have an oversight role over operational and functional issues since it has the necessary technical expertise What opportunities and threats are you facing If private laboratories are allowed to service public hospitals we will face stiffer competition as barriers to market entry lessen Our strategy is therefore to try and defend our public sector market segment while we try to penetrate the private sector and enter neighbouring countries like Angola Tanzania Zambia and Botswana We foresee that there will also be continuous growth in all of our sectors in the next 5 10 years The population is growing there is a growing middle class increased government support through improved medical aid benefits and a growing trend in lifestyle diseases Organisations are also putting in place company funded wellness programmes What barriers do you encounter when executing on your strategy aligning the organisation to its purpose Sometimes our line ministry is not prompt enough to implement changes that are happening globally and is slow in implementing best practice and global trends The fact that we re state owned limits us to a certain extent as the processes of decision making for taking on new strategies is slow Also there is a lack of skilled people We would really like to increase our level of research and development We cannot do the type of research without skilled manpower that can meaningfully contribute the national public health objectives of our government Do you feel you need to make trade offs in the way you run your business In the 15 years of our existence NIP has always operated profitably but we can always still improve We have to balance that with our primary objective of offering affordable services to the society and hence adopt strategies that will lower the pressure or in fact even exempt vulnerable members of our society from paying fees for medical laboratory services At individual laboratory level we make provision for wider value creation and improved value proposition that looks more at the benefits accruing to local communities Whereas it is easier for a CEO of a private laboratory to shut down a laboratory in a remote village that does not generate profit it is not for me as we have a mandate to service these communities How do you think success should be measured I think for any business to call itself successful would be a simple question are you desirable to have in the community within which you operate That desirability would determine whether you will be profitable whether you will have the necessary skilled staff available and whether the services rendered will be desirable to that community There are obviously other measures and success also ought to be measured from the perspective of how continuously you have been successful ideally over a period of 10 15 years How do your performance management systems monitor and evaluate delivery of societal value outcomes and impacts We expect to provide efficient yet affordable services to society Are you useful to society compared to the cost of service delivery This is another performance indicator My general opinion is that an SOE should in no way differ from a private institution in the manner in which it is rendering the same service A private hospital should in no way differ from a public hospital in terms of service delivery The way in which NIP operates should not differ from private laboratories The difference is the customer experience in the private sector is perceived to be far better than in public institutions But we also need to look more into the aspects of social responsibility which is more often than not mandatory on the part of most SOEs Do what is desirable for the business but also consider the society you operate in What difference does state ownership of your organisation make We operate in a highly regulated environment where ethics are extremely important as we work with the lives of people and highly confidential patient data The fact that the state is the 100 shareholder does not affect nor change the way we operate We are a very transparent We have various committees such as the internal board and internal executive committees as well as external committees which validate that our processes have well documented audit trails and above board We do not receive any financial backing from government other than the seed capital that was invested at the beginning We are accredited by an external body South African so we can be rated as an organisation with high performance culture in this regard Do you feel that your direct owners and non executive board members have the capability capacity clarity of role and commitment to integrity needed to deliver your organisation s purpose To me a SOE that has performance challenges has an incapable board of directors We can use various examples in Namibia Africa and the world at large that will show that incompetent directors are a primary cause of distressed companies Where a company is run efficiently profitably and in a manner that systems are in place and employees are happy it is mostly a good indicator that the directors have the competency and understanding required of their roles and responsibilities Finally what does your organisation bring to society which is not currently measured or is measured but not fully appreciated The services which the company offers are crucial without medical laboratory it would be complex and almost impossible to detect and diagnose the conditions of certain diseases and to monitor the progress and results of treatment In the case of NIP what is not particularly appreciated is the value proposition that we offer which as a matter of fact is to extend the lives of people through early detection and treatment of diseases People do not necessarily see that because of an early and accurate diagnosis the clinician can offer best treatment alternatives options to his her patients We therefore make it easier for clinicians to treat patients Franz Gertze Franz Gertze CEO Namibia Qualifications Authority NQA What is your organisational purpose The Namibia Qualifications Authority NQA exists to serve the wider Namibian society we set

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/industries/government-public-services/public-sector-research-centre/publications/government-19th-annual-ceo-survey.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Public Sector Research Centre: Join the debate
    Corporate responsibility Network governance Our contribution to the debate Genesis Park Diversity and inclusion Analyst relations Alumni Member firms worldwide Live events and discussions Strategy Research insights View featured Browse by issue Browse by industry Browse by service Monthly highlights Spotlight The CEO agenda CEO insights blog Careers About PwC Technology careers Employer of choice Our history PwC Professional Employability Aspire to lead PwC s series on leadership and gender equality Country job search Explore careers with Strategy Press room Facts and figures Press contacts Analyst relations Global International PwC Sites Commonly visited PwC sites Global Australia Brazil Canada China Hong Kong France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Middle East Netherlands Russia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites Public sector research centre Public Sector Research Centre Join the debate Rethinking government Public service under pressure Government the economy Enabling good growth Public finance Dealing with deficits paying taxes Regional development Cities of opportunity cities of the future Our goal is to make effective practical contributions to the public debate and develop new thinking on better approaches to the delivery of public services Through PSRC we set out our opinions and ideas in public service areas where our professional skills and our global reach mean we can contribute our practical experience and insight to the debate We enable a collaborative exchange of ideas which helps to inform the development and delivery of workable solutions to public sector challenges What s new Government and the 19th Annual Global CEO Survey Building better cities Paying Taxes 2016 Low Carbon Economy Index 2015 Conscious uncoupling Global defense perspectives Stay in touch Subscribe to PSRC email alerts Subscribe to Public Sector Matters Globally blog alerts Follow us on twitter Public sector research centre

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/industries/government-public-services/public-sector-research-centre.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Cities of Opportunity: Analysis and forecast of global urban economic centres: PwC
    and senior partner of PwC portrays urbanization in its strategic context A megatrend that cuts across economic social political and policy boundaries and touches every corner of the business world Video excerpts from interviews Ulla Hamilton Stockholm vice mayor for innovation discusses policies on education open broadband incentives and the simple joy of solving problems that make her city an entrepreneurial success Video excerpts from interviews Erik Brynjolfsson director of MIT s center for digital business and author of The Second Machine Age sets the stage for a new era of work as technology pushes back the frontiers for itself and for humans Cities of Opportunity 6 analyzes the trajectory of 30 cities all capitals of finance commerce and culture and through their current performance seeks to open a window on what makes cities function best We also investigate both the urbanization and demographic megatrends that shape our cities What are the factors that contribute to successful cities and resilient urban communities This year we ve organized our 10 indicators into three families that reflect the fundamentals of a well balanced city forward looking tools such as education and technology quality of life making cities healthy happy and sustainable and the ability to pay the bills for it all In summary they translate into Tools for a changing world Education technology and global access Quality of life Attaining the good life is anything but a walk in the park Economics Paying the way for progress It takes a city to make a citizen and vice versa It doesn t matter what size a city is to be successful Every one of our indicators has both small and large cities in the top 10 Even our economic clout and city gateway indicators which are intuitively associated with the larger more prominent

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/us/en/cities-of-opportunity.html (2016-02-10)
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  • PwC Global government/public services: Who we are: Defence
    Our contribution to the debate Genesis Park Diversity and inclusion Analyst relations Alumni Member firms worldwide Live events and discussions Strategy Research insights View featured Browse by issue Browse by industry Browse by service Monthly highlights Spotlight The CEO agenda CEO insights blog Careers About PwC Technology careers Employer of choice Our history PwC Professional Employability Aspire to lead PwC s series on leadership and gender equality Country job search Explore careers with Strategy Press room Facts and figures Press contacts Analyst relations Global International PwC Sites Commonly visited PwC sites Global Australia Brazil Canada China Hong Kong France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Middle East Netherlands Russia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites Defence PwC is actively helping governments and international alliances around the world understand and respond to increasing complex and unpredictable defence challenges Governments and alliances at all levels international national state and local operate in an environment characterised by increasing economic migration changing demographics diminishing natural resources rising security concerns financial pressure and a more demanding electorate In today s world the mandate to transform from traditional defence capabilities has never been stronger PwC is well equipped to facilitate this change The focus of our defense offerings is helping defence organizations to become more agile flexible accountable and able to rapidly respond PwC s network of premier business advisors has strong relationships with defense leaders at the local level while also bringing knowledge of the global security environment and the complexities and dependencies therein Below are some of the services that are delivered in a collaborative open and direct style by our professionals wherever in the world you need us Operational effectiveness Evaluation studies Stabilisation operations Human capital change management Risk governance management Program

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/industries/government-public-services/defence.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Global government/public services - Who we are - Education/not-for-profit
    service Monthly highlights Spotlight The CEO agenda CEO insights blog Careers About PwC Technology careers Employer of choice Our history PwC Professional Employability Aspire to lead PwC s series on leadership and gender equality Country job search Explore careers with Strategy Press room Facts and figures Press contacts Analyst relations Global International PwC Sites Commonly visited PwC sites Global Australia Brazil Canada China Hong Kong France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Middle East Netherlands Russia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites Education not for profit Global government public services Education is key to economic competitiveness and social cohesion It helps individuals and communities to reach their full potential Governments across the world are therefore committed to raising educational attainment and skills and promoting access to lifelong learning Governments face common challenges in seeking to achieve their education and skills objectives How can new investment in learning be managed most effectively and equitably often within decentralised governance structures What strategies can be employed to secure resources from the private and not for profit sectors What should 21st century learning organisations look like What sort of teaching and learning should take place in them How can out dated management arrangements be updated or transformed PwC is committed to helping governments and other public agencies address these and many other complex questions We can do so successfully because our work in the education sector is grounded in experience at all levels of government and public services It covers Advising international bodies such as the World Bank and the European Commission Providing consultancy support to national government education departments and their agencies on major new education policies and programmes Working with state regional and local government bodies including on organisational restructuring and

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/industries/government-public-services/education-not-for-profit.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Improve operational performance with quality financial management reporting and compliance in IPSAS requirements: PwC
    Browse by industry Browse by service Monthly highlights Spotlight The CEO agenda CEO insights blog Careers About PwC Technology careers Employer of choice Our history PwC Professional Employability Aspire to lead PwC s series on leadership and gender equality Country job search Explore careers with Strategy Press room Facts and figures Press contacts Analyst relations Global International PwC Sites Commonly visited PwC sites Global Australia Brazil Canada China Hong Kong France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Middle East Netherlands Russia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites Financial management and reporting for IPSAS compliance By introducing IPSAS and IPSAS based accounting you as a public entity demonstrate your commitment to improving the use and management of resources your desire to promote enhanced financial reporting and transparency plus greater accountability your pledge to fight fraud and corruption Your challenges You want the additional information provided by IPSAS financial accounting to be easily utilised by management to ensure that financial and budgetary accounts are complementary readily reconcilable and provide your organisation a full view of its financial management to use the enhanced information available from IPSAS to generate operational performance improvements by introducing further reforms such as cost accounting How PwC can help you We have two aims to help you improve the quality and credibility of your financial management information to guide you in using reporting for compliance and performance improvement Our solutions range from compliance reviews looking at whether IPSAS requirements are met in financial statements and annual reports to the development of cost accounting billing solutions or other management reporting that will help generate real operational performance benefits for your organisation Download Join the leaders in public finance Únete a los líderes financieros del sector public Spanish Rejoignez

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/industries/government-public-services/ipsas/improve-financial-management-for-ipsas.html (2016-02-10)
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