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  • The Trust Agenda
    Park Diversity and inclusion Analyst relations Alumni Member firms worldwide Live events and discussions Strategy Research insights View featured Browse by issue Browse by industry Browse by service Monthly highlights Spotlight The CEO agenda CEO insights blog Careers About PwC Technology careers Employer of choice Our history PwC Professional Employability Aspire to lead PwC s series on leadership and gender equality Country job search Explore careers with Strategy Press room Facts and figures Press contacts Analyst relations Global International PwC Sites Commonly visited PwC sites Global Australia Brazil Canada China Hong Kong France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Middle East Netherlands Russia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites The Trust Agenda Download CEOs are increasingly seeking good growth aligned with business ethics and sustainability Dennis Nally explores the importance of building trust for business Research insights PwC monthly highlights Archive Spotlight on Climate change China Longevity The Internet of Things Africa Water scarcity Millennials Global economic shifts Winning cities The customer Mobile technology Cyber security Sustainable value Tax and transparency The CEO agenda PwC blogs Contacts Suzanne Snowden Director Global Thought Leadership Tel 44 0 20 7212 5481

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/research-insights/the-trust-agenda.html (2016-02-10)
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  • World Watch: Norway gender equality women work: PwC
    the data behind the national rankings and discovered that the answer to What s special about Norway might be Nothing at all High employment rate Norway is often congratulated for its high general employment rate Standing at 73 8 this is a great deal higher than the EU wide average of 58 6 The share of women actively looking for work in Norway is considerably lower than the EU wide average too standing at 2 7 to the EU s 10 6 But a lot of women in Norway work part time In 2012 41 5 of women worked part time compared to 8 4 of men Also the part time working hours as a share of full time working hours for women have decreased from 59 6 to 52 9 Norwegian women in part time employment today are working fewer hours than Norwegian women working part time in 2002 Experts say that this affects their income and contributes to the gender pay gap Though a lot of Norwegian women tell surveys that they work part time by choice there are also a lot of positions that are not available full time In 2011 25 of all part time workers in the healthcare sector wanted more hours In some cases women are being under utilised Then there are the childcare services the guaranteed service to all families with children between one year and school age is seen an important enabler of gender equality Even though a large number of women work part time 77 of Norwegian children between three years old and school age are in childcare for 30 or more hours per week and 35 of children below three years of age are receiving the same amount or more of care This number has increased significantly in the last six years rising 25 between 2005 and 2011 Clearly the high percentage of children in full time care is not reflected in a high percentage of mothers being employed full time High tertiary education Norwegian women receive a longer education than European women on the whole Although the number of people in secondary education in Norway has decreased in the last decade by 6 1 the number for those in tertiary education sits well above the EU average at 31 4 to Europe s 17 1 If you break down those numbers you will find that women have higher rates of secondary and tertiary education than men So why isn t this reflected in the workplace A glance at the gender spread across different fields of education has the answer As in many other countries Norwegian women typically study more female subjects such as humanities and the arts Gender segregation across occupations in Norway is correspondingly high and in fact higher than the EU average Women marginally dominate in education and public administration professional and scientific activities are dominated by men There remains the option for women in Norway to choose what they study and how they earn their money

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/audit-assurance/corporate-reporting/world-watch/norway-gender-gaps-persist.html (2016-02-10)
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  • World Watch: India companies act forensic audit increase: PwC
    Strategy Press room Facts and figures Press contacts Analyst relations Global International PwC Sites Commonly visited PwC sites Global Australia Brazil Canada China Hong Kong France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Middle East Netherlands Russia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites India New Companies Act may be behind increased demand for forensic audits 08 Apr 2014 The number of Indian companies wanting forensic audits on their financial statements is increasing so quickly says the Indian newspaper Business Standard that large audit firms are adding hundreds of staff to their forensic teams to handle the demand Forensic audit has been front of mind for many in business in India High profile frauds such as the NSEL scam have been covered widely in national and international news and their sprawling nature affecting many organisations and corners of the market means that more forensic audits of other companies are likely Banks too are ordering forensic audits of companies that have asked them to help with corporate debt restructuring These audits would verify whether the company is really in distress or whether its funds have simply been moved around to present a picture of distress And true to the global trend the role of the auditor is coming under more scrutiny too Audit firms in India will now be regulated by the National Financial Reporting Authority Those found to be failing in their duties by signing off on fraudulent or misleading financial statements will be subject to heavy penalties But there are other reasons why demand may be rising Provisions of the new Companies Act mean that every company now has to have proactive fraud risk management policies The Act requires independent directors to increase safeguards against fraud and reminds them of

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/audit-assurance/corporate-reporting/world-watch/india-companies-act-forensic-audit-increase.html (2016-02-10)
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  • World Watch: India-companies-act-corporate-social-responsibility: PwC
    companies comply with a mandatory spend on corporate social responsibility activities or explain why they re not But grey areas persist Commentators are calling it the most talked about provision of the new Indian Companies Act 2013 and experts are cautiously welcoming the initiative of the Ministry for Corporate Affairs From 1 April Indian companies over a certain turnover threshold will have to comply with a law requiring that 2 of their average net profits of the last three years be spent on corporate social responsibility activities CSR Though the Act mandates disclosure about CSR but not a specific CSR spend per se the comply or explain approach means that a spend of 2 will be required or its absence will be scrutinised Companies with a turnover in excess of INR 1000 crore a net worth greater than INR 500 crore or a net profit of more than INR 5 crore in any financial year will be required to form a CSR committee and comply with the 2 figure The legislation will outline what constitutes CSR too with a mind to preventing corruption Political contributions or funding and funding aimed to help only the company s employees or families of employees will be banned Nor are companies allowed to choose projects that support their business objective shared value propositions have been ruled out The Act states that CSR includes activities such as protecting national heritage and culture setting up public libraries funding training to promote sports etc Companies may pool their resources collaborating with other companies to increase the impact of their CSR spending but they must still report individually According to Harinderjit Singh a PwC partner in India there are some grey areas The definition of CSR is ambiguous in one place it seems inclusive and in another restricted

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/audit-assurance/corporate-reporting/world-watch/india-companies-act-corporate-social-responsibility.html (2016-02-10)
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  • World Watch:women-in-work-index-shows-progress-stalling: PwC
    headline message from PwC s Women in Work index now in its second year The WiW Index is compiled from a weighted average of five key measures of female economic empowerment for 27 countries in the Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development OECD a club of rich countries It uses data from the OECD and other national statistics According to the Index results although countries across the OECD have made significant gains in female economic empowerment in the past decade progress seems to have stalled since the financial crisis and in some cases partially reversed Though the overall situation for women has improved with a general narrowing of the wage gap across OECD countries and an increased percentage of women participating in the workforce the female unemployment rate has risen and the proportion of women in full time employment has barely improved since 2000 Click the image here to see longer trends In some cases this may be because of the level of progress made so far Some OECD countries find it socially and culturally easier than others to implement approaches like board composition targets In those places for example Denmark and Norway less obvious measures are required to close the gap In countries that have experienced serious recent economic shocks such as the countries in Southern Europe unemployment levels have rocketed and this has disproportionately impacted women In Greece and Portugal the female unemployment rate has increased by more than 10 percentage points since 2000 and in Spain it has increased by approximately 5 percentage points Click the image here to see how female unemployment has worsened since the crisis Talking about the UK s poor figures for women in full time work Gaenor Bagley head of people and executive board member at PwC said The low level of

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/audit-assurance/corporate-reporting/world-watch/women-in-work-index-progress-stalls.html (2016-02-10)
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  • GECS 2014: Threats to the Financial Services sector: PwC
    PwC Technology careers Employer of choice Our history PwC Professional Employability Aspire to lead PwC s series on leadership and gender equality Country job search Explore careers with Strategy Press room Facts and figures Press contacts Analyst relations Global International PwC Sites Commonly visited PwC sites Global Australia Brazil Canada China Hong Kong France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Middle East Netherlands Russia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites Global Economic Crime Survey 2014 Financial Services sector analysis Download This year PwC s seventh Global Economic Crime Survey received in excess of 5 000 responses with FS respondents accounting for over a quarter of these Once again to accompany the Global Report we have released a FS sector supplement Threats to the Financial Services sector With responses from 79 different countries the results reported are truly comprehensive and intriguing Some vital statistics Growing pains Cybercrime and bribery and corruption have become more common since 2011 Tone from the top 1 in 5 significant economic crimes in FS over the past two years was committed by senior management Heads in the sand More than half of FS respondents from risk and audit functions believe their organisation will fall victim to cybercrime in the next 2 years yet only 25 of FS executive management agree Where the money s at Money laundering is almost five times more likely to occur in FS than any other sector Saving face Nearly 30 of FS respondents believe the most severe impact of money laundering to be reputational Underestimating the risk 1 in 4 FS respondents failed to conduct annual fraud risk assessments over the past two years Financial services Asset management Banking capital markets Insurance Shaping the future landscape of financial services Financial

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/industries/financial-services/publications/global-economic-crime-survey-2014-financial-services.html (2016-02-10)
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  • World Watch:SDX-protocol-directors-shareholders-communicating-better: PwC
    help avoid costly proxy battles and would help boards be braver about resisting short term voices that they hear on analyst calls But according to two PwC surveys that gap won t be easy to bridge The surveys collated in the report What matters in the boardroom show that substantial behavioural change is required if shareholders and directors are going to be able to communicate effectively For example when it comes to executive compensation 92 of investors think it s appropriate and important for the directors to engage but 65 of directors think that it s not appropriate or important In the UK and Europe it is more usual for board directors to meet shareholders in a variety of situations in the US the environment for director shareholder relations is tougher Engagement with shareholders should mean proactive outreach and clear direct and honest communications about how and why decisions are being made And the board of directors is or ought to be a central player in shareholder engagement Mary Jo White SEC chairman Same goal different experiences We prepared the report to compare the responses of these two groups to identify areas where viewpoints are shared or differences exist said Mary Ann Cloyd Leader of PwC s Center for Board Governance And we found that perspectives largely depend on whose shoes you are in directors or investors Each group surveyed experienced many of the same events in very different ways despite their nominal shared goal of long term profitability of the company they either serve on the Board of or own a stake in But among the differences there were common threads too The first was that overall there is a trend of increasing communication and each group wants to get a foothold and derive value from any engagement Around

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/audit-assurance/corporate-reporting/world-watch/directors-shareholders-need-to-communicate-more.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Banking and capital markets: The EU's Bank Recovery & Resolution Directive: PwC
    Review Our leadership team Code of conduct Corporate responsibility Network governance Our contribution to the debate Genesis Park Diversity and inclusion Analyst relations Alumni Member firms worldwide Live events and discussions Strategy Research insights View featured Browse by issue Browse by industry Browse by service Monthly highlights Spotlight The CEO agenda CEO insights blog Careers About PwC Technology careers Employer of choice Our history PwC Professional Employability Aspire to lead PwC s series on leadership and gender equality Country job search Explore careers with Strategy Press room Facts and figures Press contacts Analyst relations Global International PwC Sites Commonly visited PwC sites Global Australia Brazil Canada China Hong Kong France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Middle East Netherlands Russia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Complete list of PwC territory sites The EU s Bank Recovery Resolution Directive Download The EU s Bank Recovery Resolution Directive sets a new common framework across all 28 countries of the European Union on how troubled banks should be dealt with from precautionary early interventions to prevent failures to a framework for managing the orderly resolution of banks that operate across national borders The agreement is due to come into force on 1 January 2015 The paper explains why the BRRD is such an important milestone for Europe within the context of the wider regulatory reforms taking place in the industry and also highlights controversial and concerning aspects of the deal At heart this Directive aims to ensure that bank creditors will contribute significant funds in the event of a bank failure this has the potential to fundamentally alter the risks and costs of capital that investors may provide to banks Banking capital markets Private banking Central Bank Advisory Group Working Group reports Structured finance US Financial Instruments

    Original URL path: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/industries/financial-services/banking-capital-markets/the-eu-bank-recovery-and-resolution-directive.html (2016-02-10)
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