archive-com.com » COM » R » REALLYQUITETIRED.COM

Total: 714

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • #telosvision: rose-tinted window | reallyquitetired
    easier to create the illusion in the audience s mind that there was only one camera a single but omni present eye this feature of film making remains essential to the medium when swept up in the world of a film a modern audience no longer thinks of a cut as representing in effect a different perspective it s an irony that early films used one camera but seemed like they were seeing from many different perspectives whereas modern films use several cameras to create the illusion of one continuous perspective but of course it s not an illusion that we fully believe is it to play with cameras and cuts is fine in the context of drama however what the outcry about Frozen Planet suggests is that when it comes to documentary much of the modern day audience are less sophisticated viewers than their nineteenth century equivalents although Edison s audience marvelled at the novelty of the spectacle he created with his static open camera they were also entertained because they saw it as both familiar and magical unreal Porter s audience recognised this all the more once he learned to cut rearrange and paste his film today it seems we have become so used to the tools of the film maker s trade that we are no longer aware of them cuts are not magic tricks and cunning lies but just the way things are at the cinema we still love to be taken in by the camera when it plays with and confounds our expectations perhaps this cut means time went backwards not forwards maybe the person we ve cut to from behind is not the same as the one we just saw from the front etc it used to be however that a filmmaker achieved these results through a kind of agreement with the audience this unspoken contract is often called the suspension of disbelief this pact works because we the audience want to be entertained and the filmmaker wants to entertain what is more both parties understand that this is impossible if the audience keeps what it knows about filmmaking and how editing works and so on at the forefront of its mind while it watches the Frozen Planet incident however suggests some worrying trends entertainment is so ubiquitous a goal in television that sections of the audience have got so used to suspending it that they no longer start from a position of disbelief we are losing sight of the fact that as early cinema audiences so clearly recognised even before you add cut and paste editing into the mix reality is thoroughly different when viewed through a lens or rather what we see through a lens is a different kind of reality as Marshall McLuhan noted the medium is the message audiences are increasingly essentialising TV along genre lines and in accordance with Modernist principles i e if Sky says it is News or History or Documentary then it will be true and

    Original URL path: http://reallyquitetired.com/2011/12/13/telosvision-rose-tinted-window/ (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive


  • David Attenborough | reallyquitetired
    the new angle at the point in time that the cut occurred this innovation was key to the art by no longer repeating the action when the camera moved it became easier to create the illusion in the audience s mind that there was only one camera a single but omni present eye this feature of film making remains essential to the medium when swept up in the world of a film a modern audience no longer thinks of a cut as representing in effect a different perspective it s an irony that early films used one camera but seemed like they were seeing from many different perspectives whereas modern films use several cameras to create the illusion of one continuous perspective but of course it s not an illusion that we fully believe is it to play with cameras and cuts is fine in the context of drama however what the outcry about Frozen Planet suggests is that when it comes to documentary much of the modern day audience are less sophisticated viewers than their nineteenth century equivalents although Edison s audience marvelled at the novelty of the spectacle he created with his static open camera they were also entertained because they saw it as both familiar and magical unreal Porter s audience recognised this all the more once he learned to cut rearrange and paste his film today it seems we have become so used to the tools of the film maker s trade that we are no longer aware of them cuts are not magic tricks and cunning lies but just the way things are at the cinema we still love to be taken in by the camera when it plays with and confounds our expectations perhaps this cut means time went backwards not forwards maybe the person we ve cut to from behind is not the same as the one we just saw from the front etc it used to be however that a filmmaker achieved these results through a kind of agreement with the audience this unspoken contract is often called the suspension of disbelief this pact works because we the audience want to be entertained and the filmmaker wants to entertain what is more both parties understand that this is impossible if the audience keeps what it knows about filmmaking and how editing works and so on at the forefront of its mind while it watches the Frozen Planet incident however suggests some worrying trends entertainment is so ubiquitous a goal in television that sections of the audience have got so used to suspending it that they no longer start from a position of disbelief we are losing sight of the fact that as early cinema audiences so clearly recognised even before you add cut and paste editing into the mix reality is thoroughly different when viewed through a lens or rather what we see through a lens is a different kind of reality as Marshall McLuhan noted the medium is the message audiences

    Original URL path: http://reallyquitetired.com/tag/david-attenborough/ (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Edwin S Porter | reallyquitetired
    the new angle at the point in time that the cut occurred this innovation was key to the art by no longer repeating the action when the camera moved it became easier to create the illusion in the audience s mind that there was only one camera a single but omni present eye this feature of film making remains essential to the medium when swept up in the world of a film a modern audience no longer thinks of a cut as representing in effect a different perspective it s an irony that early films used one camera but seemed like they were seeing from many different perspectives whereas modern films use several cameras to create the illusion of one continuous perspective but of course it s not an illusion that we fully believe is it to play with cameras and cuts is fine in the context of drama however what the outcry about Frozen Planet suggests is that when it comes to documentary much of the modern day audience are less sophisticated viewers than their nineteenth century equivalents although Edison s audience marvelled at the novelty of the spectacle he created with his static open camera they were also entertained because they saw it as both familiar and magical unreal Porter s audience recognised this all the more once he learned to cut rearrange and paste his film today it seems we have become so used to the tools of the film maker s trade that we are no longer aware of them cuts are not magic tricks and cunning lies but just the way things are at the cinema we still love to be taken in by the camera when it plays with and confounds our expectations perhaps this cut means time went backwards not forwards maybe the person we ve cut to from behind is not the same as the one we just saw from the front etc it used to be however that a filmmaker achieved these results through a kind of agreement with the audience this unspoken contract is often called the suspension of disbelief this pact works because we the audience want to be entertained and the filmmaker wants to entertain what is more both parties understand that this is impossible if the audience keeps what it knows about filmmaking and how editing works and so on at the forefront of its mind while it watches the Frozen Planet incident however suggests some worrying trends entertainment is so ubiquitous a goal in television that sections of the audience have got so used to suspending it that they no longer start from a position of disbelief we are losing sight of the fact that as early cinema audiences so clearly recognised even before you add cut and paste editing into the mix reality is thoroughly different when viewed through a lens or rather what we see through a lens is a different kind of reality as Marshall McLuhan noted the medium is the message audiences

    Original URL path: http://reallyquitetired.com/tag/edwin-s-porter/ (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Polar bears | reallyquitetired
    action from the new angle at the point in time that the cut occurred this innovation was key to the art by no longer repeating the action when the camera moved it became easier to create the illusion in the audience s mind that there was only one camera a single but omni present eye this feature of film making remains essential to the medium when swept up in the world of a film a modern audience no longer thinks of a cut as representing in effect a different perspective it s an irony that early films used one camera but seemed like they were seeing from many different perspectives whereas modern films use several cameras to create the illusion of one continuous perspective but of course it s not an illusion that we fully believe is it to play with cameras and cuts is fine in the context of drama however what the outcry about Frozen Planet suggests is that when it comes to documentary much of the modern day audience are less sophisticated viewers than their nineteenth century equivalents although Edison s audience marvelled at the novelty of the spectacle he created with his static open camera they were also entertained because they saw it as both familiar and magical unreal Porter s audience recognised this all the more once he learned to cut rearrange and paste his film today it seems we have become so used to the tools of the film maker s trade that we are no longer aware of them cuts are not magic tricks and cunning lies but just the way things are at the cinema we still love to be taken in by the camera when it plays with and confounds our expectations perhaps this cut means time went backwards not forwards maybe the person we ve cut to from behind is not the same as the one we just saw from the front etc it used to be however that a filmmaker achieved these results through a kind of agreement with the audience this unspoken contract is often called the suspension of disbelief this pact works because we the audience want to be entertained and the filmmaker wants to entertain what is more both parties understand that this is impossible if the audience keeps what it knows about filmmaking and how editing works and so on at the forefront of its mind while it watches the Frozen Planet incident however suggests some worrying trends entertainment is so ubiquitous a goal in television that sections of the audience have got so used to suspending it that they no longer start from a position of disbelief we are losing sight of the fact that as early cinema audiences so clearly recognised even before you add cut and paste editing into the mix reality is thoroughly different when viewed through a lens or rather what we see through a lens is a different kind of reality as Marshall McLuhan noted the medium is the

    Original URL path: http://reallyquitetired.com/tag/polar-bears/ (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • #telosvision: treme (the third, fourth & subsequent lines) | reallyquitetired
    main characters is based on New Orleans based academic blogger and political activist Ashley Morris who wrote profusely and passionately about The Wire and as a result became close friends with David Simon in 2008 Morris died from a massive heart attack at the age of forty five two years later another of Simon s long time friends and collaborators David Mills the first season s co executive producer and writer and staff writer on NYPD Blue Homicide E R The Corner and The Wire suffered an aneurysm and dropped dead in New Orleans twelve days before the premiere of season 1 there is little doubt that these tragedies close to Simon as well as the numerous testimonies of those who suffered through the storm shaped the tone of both series of Treme however the most beautiful moments Treme offers are those flickers of light that peak through the gloom when laughter and good eating and dancing take away the pain and renew the faith of the characters but i would be lying if these are the rule within the emotional landscape rather than the exception just as in The Wire people die and with alarming frequency and remorseless equality i e don t ever go thinking that central characters are safe post Katrina New Orleans is a disturbed place wrapped around disturbed people in a strange way the losses that we witness that we grieve bring with them a sense of calm and order that Treme has few other ways of portraying i cannot help but think this is how it must have felt for many New Orleans people after the storm with the finality surety and neatness of death providing a kind of perverted solace as with The Wire the faces come and go but what remains what is really the focus of our attentions is the city the New Orleans of Treme is like a child perpetually struggling in the surf just as it splutteringly finds its feet another wave perhaps smaller perhaps larger than the last rolls in the kicking the gasping the jumping is never over the only way out is when you have no strength left but there is hope yet the cultural bonds the songs the marches the dances are so powerful are down so deep are spread so wide that life will must go on as one character notes following the death of a friend towards the end of season 2 he was always broke but never beat Treme wants to say that post Katrina New Orleans will forever be broken in a specific way but will never be beaten i don t know about you but that s a message from which i can take hope everywhere i look around i see the unmistakable signs of brokenness and sometime even the glorious moments of peace or the beams of truth that shine through can t make up for the unescapable reality that damaged people damage people however when the short term

    Original URL path: http://reallyquitetired.com/2011/06/30/telosvision-treme-the-third-fourth-subsequent-lines/ (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • David Simon | reallyquitetired
    outset in tragedy aside from the colossal tragedy of Katrina the project itself was steeped in loss one the main characters is based on New Orleans based academic blogger and political activist Ashley Morris who wrote profusely and passionately about The Wire and as a result became close friends with David Simon in 2008 Morris died from a massive heart attack at the age of forty five two years later another of Simon s long time friends and collaborators David Mills the first season s co executive producer and writer and staff writer on NYPD Blue Homicide E R The Corner and The Wire suffered an aneurysm and dropped dead in New Orleans twelve days before the premiere of season 1 there is little doubt that these tragedies close to Simon as well as the numerous testimonies of those who suffered through the storm shaped the tone of both series of Treme however the most beautiful moments Treme offers are those flickers of light that peak through the gloom when laughter and good eating and dancing take away the pain and renew the faith of the characters but i would be lying if these are the rule within the emotional landscape rather than the exception just as in The Wire people die and with alarming frequency and remorseless equality i e don t ever go thinking that central characters are safe post Katrina New Orleans is a disturbed place wrapped around disturbed people in a strange way the losses that we witness that we grieve bring with them a sense of calm and order that Treme has few other ways of portraying i cannot help but think this is how it must have felt for many New Orleans people after the storm with the finality surety and neatness of death providing a kind of perverted solace as with The Wire the faces come and go but what remains what is really the focus of our attentions is the city the New Orleans of Treme is like a child perpetually struggling in the surf just as it splutteringly finds its feet another wave perhaps smaller perhaps larger than the last rolls in the kicking the gasping the jumping is never over the only way out is when you have no strength left but there is hope yet the cultural bonds the songs the marches the dances are so powerful are down so deep are spread so wide that life will must go on as one character notes following the death of a friend towards the end of season 2 he was always broke but never beat Treme wants to say that post Katrina New Orleans will forever be broken in a specific way but will never be beaten i don t know about you but that s a message from which i can take hope everywhere i look around i see the unmistakable signs of brokenness and sometime even the glorious moments of peace or the beams of truth that shine

    Original URL path: http://reallyquitetired.com/tag/david-simon/ (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Funk | reallyquitetired
    later another of Simon s long time friends and collaborators David Mills the first season s co executive producer and writer and staff writer on NYPD Blue Homicide E R The Corner and The Wire suffered an aneurysm and dropped dead in New Orleans twelve days before the premiere of season 1 there is little doubt that these tragedies close to Simon as well as the numerous testimonies of those who suffered through the storm shaped the tone of both series of Treme however the most beautiful moments Treme offers are those flickers of light that peak through the gloom when laughter and good eating and dancing take away the pain and renew the faith of the characters but i would be lying if these are the rule within the emotional landscape rather than the exception just as in The Wire people die and with alarming frequency and remorseless equality i e don t ever go thinking that central characters are safe post Katrina New Orleans is a disturbed place wrapped around disturbed people in a strange way the losses that we witness that we grieve bring with them a sense of calm and order that Treme has few other ways of portraying i cannot help but think this is how it must have felt for many New Orleans people after the storm with the finality surety and neatness of death providing a kind of perverted solace as with The Wire the faces come and go but what remains what is really the focus of our attentions is the city the New Orleans of Treme is like a child perpetually struggling in the surf just as it splutteringly finds its feet another wave perhaps smaller perhaps larger than the last rolls in the kicking the gasping the jumping is never over the only way out is when you have no strength left but there is hope yet the cultural bonds the songs the marches the dances are so powerful are down so deep are spread so wide that life will must go on as one character notes following the death of a friend towards the end of season 2 he was always broke but never beat Treme wants to say that post Katrina New Orleans will forever be broken in a specific way but will never be beaten i don t know about you but that s a message from which i can take hope everywhere i look around i see the unmistakable signs of brokenness and sometime even the glorious moments of peace or the beams of truth that shine through can t make up for the unescapable reality that damaged people damage people however when the short term goals of protecting those we love and holding on to what is ours become frustrated by the ebbs and flows of existence sometimes that is when its possible to see clearest that however broken life gets it will never be truly beaten frustrated yes waiting with eager anticipation for a

    Original URL path: http://reallyquitetired.com/tag/funk/ (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • New Orleans | reallyquitetired
    from the outset in tragedy aside from the colossal tragedy of Katrina the project itself was steeped in loss one the main characters is based on New Orleans based academic blogger and political activist Ashley Morris who wrote profusely and passionately about The Wire and as a result became close friends with David Simon in 2008 Morris died from a massive heart attack at the age of forty five two years later another of Simon s long time friends and collaborators David Mills the first season s co executive producer and writer and staff writer on NYPD Blue Homicide E R The Corner and The Wire suffered an aneurysm and dropped dead in New Orleans twelve days before the premiere of season 1 there is little doubt that these tragedies close to Simon as well as the numerous testimonies of those who suffered through the storm shaped the tone of both series of Treme however the most beautiful moments Treme offers are those flickers of light that peak through the gloom when laughter and good eating and dancing take away the pain and renew the faith of the characters but i would be lying if these are the rule within the emotional landscape rather than the exception just as in The Wire people die and with alarming frequency and remorseless equality i e don t ever go thinking that central characters are safe post Katrina New Orleans is a disturbed place wrapped around disturbed people in a strange way the losses that we witness that we grieve bring with them a sense of calm and order that Treme has few other ways of portraying i cannot help but think this is how it must have felt for many New Orleans people after the storm with the finality surety and neatness of death providing a kind of perverted solace as with The Wire the faces come and go but what remains what is really the focus of our attentions is the city the New Orleans of Treme is like a child perpetually struggling in the surf just as it splutteringly finds its feet another wave perhaps smaller perhaps larger than the last rolls in the kicking the gasping the jumping is never over the only way out is when you have no strength left but there is hope yet the cultural bonds the songs the marches the dances are so powerful are down so deep are spread so wide that life will must go on as one character notes following the death of a friend towards the end of season 2 he was always broke but never beat Treme wants to say that post Katrina New Orleans will forever be broken in a specific way but will never be beaten i don t know about you but that s a message from which i can take hope everywhere i look around i see the unmistakable signs of brokenness and sometime even the glorious moments of peace or the beams of truth

    Original URL path: http://reallyquitetired.com/tag/new-orleans/ (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive



  •