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  • RTC Expands to Meet Rescuer Needs
    for staging rescue equipment and training evolutions The new area will be under a covered roof making rescue training on the prop a bit more user friendly in our south Louisiana climate Nearly complete is the new stairway on the south side of the prop that will provide additional access to the structure and more anchor points for rescue students taking courses at RTC With these new features the prop is increasing its student capacity by approximately 33 rescuers per day Last year a boil er simulator was added which focuses on extremely tight 12 x 15 horizontal confined spaces found at many industrial settings old and new Roco is constantly surveying our students to find out what their particular problem spaces are said Dennis O Connell Director of Training for Roco We try to duplicate those confined spaces at RTC so students can practice the skills they will need if a problem occurs at their site This way they get a more accurate experience The anticipated completion date for the additions to RTC is April 15 2015 It is sure to add a few more challenges for Roco students who are familiar with the prop as well as a few more conveniences Previous Next New Stuff Atmospheric Monitors May NOT Detect All Dangers Roco QUICK DRILL 10 Tripod Quick Drill Service Life Guidelines for Rescue Equipment NFPA Issues New Guide for Confined Spaces Gravedigger Engulfed In Cave in of Unguarded Grave Hot Topics ATMOSPHERIC HAZARDS 6 CONFINED SPACE 58 EQUIPMENT 36 FALL PROTECTION 16 FIRE FIGHTERS 1 HOW TO VIDEOS 6 INCIDENTS 27 MISCELLANEOUS 40 NEWS 90 OSHA MEMORANDUM 2 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 36 QUICK DRILLS 12 REGULATIONS 31 SAFETY 55 STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE 5 TECHNIQUES 23 TRAINING 6 TRENCH 10 RescueTalk RocoRescue com has been created as a free

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/rtc-expansion (2016-02-15)
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  • Roco Tech Panel Q&A - Prompt Rescue by Shift
    as IDLH atmospheres From the Summary and Explanation of the Final Rule 1910 146 OSHA has therefore decided to promulgate the requirement it proposed for timely rescue a requirement that was not opposed by any rulemaking participant rather than to define precisely what is timely That determination will be based on the particular circumstances and hazards of each confined space circumstances and hazards which the employer must take into account in developing a rescue plan OSHA has added a note to paragraph k 1 i to clarify this point From 1910 146 Appendix F A Initial Evaluation II 1 What are the needs of the employer with regard to response time time for the rescue service to receive notification arrive at the scene and set up and be ready for entry For example if entry is to be made into an IDLH atmosphere or into a space that can quickly develop an IDLH atmosphere if ventilation fails or for other reasons the rescue team or service would need to be standing by at the permit space On the other hand if the danger to entrants is restricted to mechanical hazards that would cause injuries e g broken bones abrasions a response time of 10 or 15 minutes might be adequate The response time of the rescue service is also different than the time needed to provide rescue Response time generally means the time it takes for the rescue service to arrive on scene From that time forward the rescue service must perform a size up identify and don PPE set up rescue systems and perform many other tasks before initiating entry rescue Any need to provide victim packaging or to deliver breathing air to the victim will add to the total time it takes to complete the rescue Therefore it is imperative that the employer ensures that the measure of Prompt Rescue is driven by the nature of the known or potential hazards of the permitted confined space as well as the complexities of the configuration of the space and how those will effect the time required to the setup the rescue system Roco provides confined space rescue services for a variety of industries and is confronted with a very wide range of hazards associated with the entry operations and a vast range of space configurations The determination on the rescue team s posture is based primarily on the answer to the following questions 1 How quickly will the entrants be overcome by the known or potential hazard s of the space and or how quickly will the entrants suffer permanent injury if exposed to those hazards 2 If non entry retrieval systems are not employed due to the system not contributing to an effective rescue or the retrieval system creates a greater hazard how much time would be needed to arrive on scene set up an entry rescue system to support the entrant rescuer s and the victim s These are just two of the primary questions that we

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/roco-tech-panel-q-a-prompt-rescue-by-shift (2016-02-15)
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  • Roco QUICK DRILL #6
    of systems piggy back vs Z rig Play what if and problem solve Tips Hints Pre measure your lines We say start where you want to end up This drill is nothing more than lowering the end knots to the ground to assure you have enough rope to do the lower It also allows you to inspect the rope for damage before life loading the lines If you do this with both ends of your rope and you have enough rope to reach from the ground to your two anchor points independently you now know you have enough rope for both the mainline and safety line system Any additional line left between the two systems can be used to extend anchor points rigging or build mechanical advantage systems Many times we use this technique of splitting rope from a single rope bag as our safety retrieval line for rescue entrants during confined space rescue We use rope bags that allow us to work from either end of the rope easily We take two different color ropes usually 125 ft tie them together and load the bag from both ends with the knot in the middle double fisherman This allows us to run safety lines to two rescuers out of one bag Since each rope is a different color it helps with line management communications identification and emergency retrieval If your rescue scenarios require entrants to advance more than 125 ft then longer ropes can be substituted The rope can also be used as a single 250 ft safety line provided you have knot passing capabilities Manage your ropes Without good rope management your work area can easily turn into a tangled mess This drill forces rescuers to think ahead and outside the box in order to allocate appropriate lengths of

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/roco-quick-drill-6 (2016-02-15)
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  • Q&A: Appendix F (1910.146)
    rescue service becomes unavailable while an entry is underway does it have the capability of notifying the employer so that the employer can instruct the attendant to abort the entry immediately This provision does not create a mandatory requirement but it does prompt the employer to take into account mandatory requirements of the standard OSHA 1910 146 j 3 makes it mandatory for the entry supervisor to terminate the entry and cancel the permit as required by paragraph e 5 of the standard Paragraph e 5 requires the entry supervisor to cancel the entry permit when a condition that is not allowed under the entry permit arises If the particular entry requires rescue service availability and the rescue service suddenly becomes unavailable during the entry that would be a condition that is not allowed under the entry permit requiring the entry supervisor to cancel the permit So although there is no provision that specifically states that the rescue service notify the employer if it becomes unavailable from a practical standpoint the employer cannot comply with the requirement that it cancel the permit and terminate the entry when a condition not allowed under the entry permit arises unless such a notification system is in place This is just one example of how the provisions of non mandatory Appendix F provide a method to comply with mandatory requirements When considering the provisions of non mandatory Appendix F the employer would be wise to determine which mandatory provisions the method stated in the appendix addresses Of course the employer is free to choose some other method to comply with the mandatory provision and does not necessarily have to follow the method suggested in the appendix In that sense the appendix is non mandatory But nonetheless the employer must comply with the underlying mandatory

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/q-a-appendix-f (2016-02-15)
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  • RescueTalk™
    compare current safety practices such as Management of Change MOC and how the absence of that particular management tool has left many retired confined spaces and other systems in a potentially dangerous state Because of the potential dangers posed to emergency responders we wanted to share this article with our readers Cli ck to d ownload th e full article Here are some key points from the article Retired and Dangerous Out of Service Equipment Hazards by Robert Wasileski Management of Change is emphasized more during the design and operational phase of equipment life cycles but receives little emphasis when it is time to retire the equipment Older facilities have a high potential to have retired equipment that haven t had all hazards addressed and may pose serious risks Equipment that has been out of service for an extended period of time often has very little data on record stating how it was prepared to be taken out of service There are many instances of chemical reactions that can change the physical condition of the equipment over time The author provides several case studies that are truly enlightening It includes some excellent lessons for rescuers when dealing with out of service or moth balled vessels While a couple of the cases delve pretty deeply into chemical reactions it serves as a critical reminder of how important it is to check with a qualified person Remember just because a vessel has been out of service for a long period of time does not mean there are no hazards present read more Are You Sure You Don t Need On Air Rescue Practice Thursday August 28 2014 Reported by Dennis O Connell Director of Training After more than 25 years in the rescue industry I always cringe a bit when I hear rescue teams say they don t practice on air rescues because personnel at their facilities are not allowed to do planned work activities in IDLH or low O2 areas But I always ask what about the permit spaces that may have the potential for atmospheric hazards What about those spaces that may unexpectedly become IDLH or low O2 what then I have raised this flag many times before and according to NIOSH a little less than half the deaths from atmospheric conditions occurred in spaces that originally tested as being acceptable for entry Something happened unexpectedly and something went very wrong Remember OSHA states that a confined space simply has to have the potential for a hazardous atmosphere not that it is actually present as one of the triggers to make a space a permit required space and require rescue capabilities So for these unexpected instances do you really have the appropriate rescue response in place In our opinion not training your team to respond to IDLH emergencies is like buying a gun for home protection but not buying any bullets Also 1910 146 section k 1 i makes reference to 1910 134 OSHA s respiratory regulation Here OSHA talks about respiratory protection being worn by entrants as the trigger for standby rescue personnel capable of immediate action It is not necessarily based on the level of O2 It calls for rescue standby not rescue available Immediate action is called for not just a timely response OSHA Note to Paragraph k 1 i What will be considered timely will vary according to the specific hazards involved in each entry For example 1910 134 Respiratory Protection requires that employers provide a standby person or persons capable of immediate action to rescue employee s wearing respiratory protection while in work areas defined as IDLH atmospheres If that s not a hint as to how seriously OSHA takes the possibility of an IDLH atmosphere arising in a permit space I don t know what would be So if you don t think you ll ever need on air rescue capabilities take a look at this incident from a few years back The way this confined space fatality occurred and the possibility of it happening is a real eye opener It emphasizes the critical importance for considering all possible or potential hazards associated with confined space entry and rescue Folks what I m trying to say here is as rescuers we need to be prepared for the worst case scenario as well as the unexpected This is especially true when it comes to confined spaces When I hear We don t need on air practice because we don t allow IDLH entries at our facility Well neither did these guys Fatal Activation of CO2 Fire Protection System in Confined Space Sheffield Forgemasters was ordered to pay heavy fines and costs for safety failings that led to an employee dying of carbon dioxide poisoning after the cellar he was working in filled with the deadly gas A worker was found unconscious at the South Yorkshire foundry after a confined underground area swiftly flooded with the fire extinguishing mist Four of his co workers desperately tried to reach him but were themselves almost overcome by the fast acting gas The worker who had three grown up sons was pronounced dead on arrival at the hospital after the incident at the firm s plant on 30 May 2008 The Health and Safety Executive HSE investigated and prosecuted the company for serious safety failings On December 19th 2013 Sheffield Crown Court heard that on the morning of the incident the worker had carried out part of the cable cutting task in an electrical drawpit and then went to carry out the rest of the job in the switchroom cellar which was only accessible by lifting a manhole cover and dropping down a ladder Once underground at the electrical drawpit the worker used a petrol driven saw to cut through redundant 33 000 volt cables At some point he moved from there to the nearby switchroom cellar with the saw Later that morning colleagues heard the carbon dioxide CO2 warning alarms sounding from the cellar A supervisor and other workmates rushed to help with several of them trying to get down the ladder from the manhole to rescue the worker from the cellar s confines However all attempts were defeated as each worker struggled to breathe and remain conscious when exposed to the debilitating concentrated carbon dioxide The victim had to be brought to the surface later using slings HSE found that use of the petrol driven saw in the switchroom cellar had likely activated a smoke sensor and prompted the release of the carbon dioxide from the fire extinguishing system The court was told Sheffield Forgemasters had failed to provide any rescue equipment for either the cellar or the drawpit Other issues identified included a lack of a risk assessment by the firm for the cable cutting task and failing to provide a safe system of work in either underground location In addition there was no secure way to isolate the carbon dioxide fire system while work was going on in the cellar After the hearing a HSE Inspector said This was a very upsetting incident that resulted in the needless death of this employee It could have been an even worse tragedy as it was pure chance that another four workers who entered the cellar in a desperate bid to save their colleague did not also perish Exposure to between 10 15 of CO2 for more than a minute causes drowsiness and unconsciousness Exposure to 17 30 is fatal in less than one minute Carbon dioxide is poisonous even if there is an otherwise sufficient supply of oxygen The risks associated with confined spaces are well known in industry and there is an entire set of regulations dealing with controlling the risks associated with them Multiple fatalities do occur when one person gets into difficulty in such a space and then the rescuers are similarly overcome Sheffield Forgemasters had given no thought to the risks associated with the task being undertaken nor had they provided emergency rescue equipment This case shows how important it is for companies to effectively risk assess work activities looking at how the work will be carried out and in what circumstances read more Roco QUICK DRILL 4 Selecting the Proper Knot and Tying Correctly Wednesday August 13 2014 Being able to tie a knot in the classroom with a rope short vs selecting the proper knot and tying it correctly in the field during an emergency requires experience With a little imagination you can provide your team members numerous scenarios to practice in just a short period of time while they are still within a controlled environment This practice will help them to gain more experience that should pay off in the long run if needed during a real life emergency 1 Identify the knots your team uses and where they are used in various systems 2 Lay out a series of applications where team members would need to tie a knot Decide in advance what knots are acceptable in these applications since many times more than one knot may get the job done 3 Once you have established the acceptable knots lay out a gauntlet of knot tying stations 4 Each team member will go through each station first deciding which knot to use and then tying it as it would be used in the application examples end knot in a lower line vertical bridle knot lashing a backboard adjustable anchor self equalizing anchor etc The goal is to have team members choose an appropriate knot tie it correctly and apply it properly based on the rescue system presented Two examples for knot stations are 1 Backboard lashing have the lashing complete except for the knot at the end and 2 Mainline rigged except for the knot attaching it to the anchor CHECK OUT OUR RESCUE KNOT VIDEO SERIES Download the Rescue Knots PDF read more OSHA Emergency Response Meeting in Washington DC Thursday August 07 2014 Reported by Jim Breen Roco Rescue Director of Operations On July 30 and 31 OSHA held an Emergency Response and Preparedness Stakeholders meeting in Washington DC for the purpose of discussing the merits and potential content of an emergency response and preparedness standard Meeting participants were from a broad range of both public and private industry experts to include two Roco representatives Jim Breen Director of Operations and Dennis O Connell Director of Training Also participating were representatives from NFPA IAFF IAFC USFA Louisiana Fire Chiefs Association Phillips 66 BASF Corporation Chevron Pipeline Company Chicago Fire Department and the American Red Cross to name a few The discussion allowed participants to highlight their experiences voice concerns and provide input to OSHA administrators who are tasked to make a need and content recommendations to OSHA s senior leadership The meeting consisted of four main topics 1 Which phases of an emergency incident should be included in a standard 2 Should the standard be inclusive of all incident types or should it be focused on those types of incidents that have resulted in a line of duty deaths LODDs 3 What content should be included in the standard 4 How can OSHA construct a standard that is practical relevant and flexible enough to cover all organizations regardless of size and complexity OSHA was particularly mindful of having participants identifying issues that would impede the practical application of an emergency response and preparedness standard OSHA administrators were very receptive of the views of the participants and stressed that they were not interested in writing a tactical or tactics standard Although OSHA did not elaborate on any specific course of direction it is our impression and hope that OSHA will begin drafting an emergency response and preparedness standard that is performance based with a strong strategic focus that emphasizes a recognized incident management system outlines preparation activities inclusive of pre incident planning and is structured around the basic functions of command that will apply to all emergency response organizations that are subject to OSHA oversight Emergency response is one of the most hazardous occupations in America Emergency responders include firefighters emergency medical service personnel hazardous material employees and technical rescue specialists Also law enforcement officers usually are considered emergency responders because they often assist in emergency response incidents Source OSHA gov and NFPA FEMA 2012 Reports on Firefighter Fatalities Background Information from OSHA gov OSHA notes that there are no standards issued by the Agency that specifically address occupational hazards uniquely related to law enforcement activities Many emergency responders have cross training in these specialties and may serve in multiple roles depending upon the type of emergency incident involved Skilled support employees are not emergency responders but nonetheless have specialized training that can be important to the safe and successful resolution of an emergency incident OSHA issued a Request for Information in September 2007 that solicited comments from the public to evaluate what action if any the Agency should take to further address emergency response and preparedness Recent events such as the 2013 tragedy in West Texas that killed several emergency responders and an analysis of information provided make it clear that emergency responder health and safety continues to be an area of ongoing concern For this reason OSHA conducted the stakeholder meetings to gather additional information read more A Job Hazard Analysis for Work at Height Thursday July 31 2014 The following article was featured in the June 2014 issue of ISHN and authored by Roco Chief Instructor Pat Furr As part of my safety consulting duties I have seen many fall protection programs for a wide variety of industries When I ask about an employer s fall protection plan it s pretty scary to be told Well I can show you our program in two minutes and then see no more than a locker with a rag tag assortment of body belts harnesses and a few six foot energy absorbing lanyards of questionable integrity Now it is rare to come across such an inadequate program But truth be told the comprehensiveness diligence and effectiveness of the programs I have assessed run a fairly wide spectrum from so so to top notch Top notch programs all had several common elements but the one element that stands out the most as being consistently included in the best programs is the completion of fall hazard surveys A Comprehensive Survey The fall hazard survey or what I like to call the fall hazard walk about is a critical early step in the process of assembling a comprehensive managed fall protection program And a survey should be conducted again when certain changes occur including but not limited to changes in the facility configuration changes to work processes changes to legislated requirements and the emergence of modern fall protection equipment solutions Outlined in ANSI Z359 2 the fall hazard survey is an effective means to identify areas where work is performed at height identify ways to eliminate or control fall hazards and help determine which hazards require the highest priority when it comes to allocating sometimes limited resources A comprehensive fall hazard survey is the best way to identify and understand the types of fall hazards that need to be addressed to provide the best protection to your workers at height This requires that the Qualified or Competent Person do a top to bottom left to right tour of the facility to identify known areas where work at height is currently being performed and any areas where future work at height may take place It may be helpful to have an area foreman or even an Authorized Person with thorough knowledge of the specific work areas available to ask questions regarding the work process and their needs and concerns The goal of this survey is to not only identify areas of work at height but to determine the most protective means of abating the fall hazards The goal of this survey is to not only identify areas of work at height but to determine the most protective means of abating fall hazards The Qualified Competent Person must have the Hierarchy of Fall Protection in mind at all times By having the goal of eliminating the fall hazard first and foremost any opportunities to bring the work to the ground or to perform the work from the ground should present themselves during this survey This may require a change in the configuration of certain structures or the retrofitting of systems that allow the work to be performed from the ground This may incur some significant costs but in the long run the changes will be more than offset by avoiding a fall from height and the direct and indirect costs of such an accident Continuing the survey while still adhering to the Hierarchy of Fall Protection the Qualified Competent Person may have to consider the use of fall restraint measures either passive measures in the form of guardrails or parapets or active measures in the form of body belts or harnesses with lanyards anchored in a way that the system prevents the Authorized Worker from reaching the leading edge of a fall hazard Once active measures are employed it is critically important to work with the Authorized Persons to understand what their work activities entail to come to a solution that provides the needed protection but also considers their need for mobility If the lower echelons of the Hierarchy of Fall Protection cannot be employed a fall arrest system may be the only feasible solution A Fall Arrest Solution If the lower echelons of the Hierarchy of Fall Protection cannot be employed a fall arrest system may be the only feasible solution This is where the Qualified Competent Person s knowledge of current fall arrest systems and components really shows its value Lightweight breathable multi function fall protection equipment available today protects workers while also providing the ease of use and freedom of movement that has been missing for many years This is an important tool that the Competent Person can use to

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/page/6/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Combustile Dust Hazard Awareness
    from powdered milk and egg whites that can create weak explosions to dusts from items such as magnesium and aluminum that can result in very strong explosions But I think we can all agree that no explosion even a weak explosion is a good explosion especially if it occurs during rescue operations As rescuers you should already be familiar with the fire triangle To understand the danger of combustible dusts you should also be familiar wit h the dust explosion pentagon The dust explosion pentagon consists of the following Combustible Dust Fuel Ignition Source Oxygen Dispersion of dust suspension Containment of the dust in a confined or semi confined area Enclosures Building Confined Space Rescuers should be on the lookout for any appreciable accumulation of dust when sizing up a rescue situation Keep in mind that your atmospheric monitor containing a sensor for combustible gases is not effective for detecting a hazard from combustible dust Always remain aware that in a suspended state dust becomes explosive Dust explosions occur when combustible dust is present forms a dust cloud in an enclosed environment and is exposed to oxygen and an ignition source The explosion occurs as a result of the rapid burning of the dust cloud which creates a rapid pressure rise in the enclosed area or confined space A dust pile that may burn while an ignition source is being applied then go out immediately or shortly after the ignition source is removed can become lethally explosive when scattered and suspended in the air Always consider the potential for combustible dust in any rescue situation particularly when ventilation of an enclosure building or confined space is considered A safe area can become a ticking bomb if ventilation results in the suspension of otherwise stable dust accumulations This article was written by Robert Aguiluz who is currently an Administrative Law Judge for the State of Louisiana He is also an attorney who specializes in Occupational Safety and Health Law and regulatory and compliance issues He is a former Certified Safety Professional and Roco Rescue Instructor with over twenty years experience in both industrial and municipal emergency response and rescue Combustible Dust Considerations for Emergency Responders 1 Know your response area and the types of industry that may have the potential for combustible dust If you are performing standby rescue duties meet with the SH E management team to learn about any combustible dust hazards at their facility 2 Become familiar with the deflagration index for various types of materials See sample Chart below Examples of K st Values for Different Types of Dust 3 Consider the effect of ventilating a space that has accumulations of combustible dust Will you cause the dust to become suspended Will the suspended moving dust create a static charge discharge and become a source of ignition Can your ventilation equipment become a source of ignition 4 Is there information to review on the SDS Safety Data Sheet regarding the material s potential to become combustible dust

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/combustile-dust-hazard-awareness (2016-02-15)
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  • Tips for Using Roco’s Confined Space Types Chart
    to the space or elevation of the portal While the rescue service may practice rescues from Top Side and Bottom portals if it s from ground level that s very different from a portal that s at a 100 ft elevation Here s where high angle or elevated rescue techniques normally are required for getting the patient lowered to ground level This is important Rescue practice from a representative space needs to be a true representation of the kind of rescue that may be required in an emergency In Appendix F OSHA offers guidelines for determining Representative Spaces for Rescue Practice OSHA adds that teams may practice in representative spaces that are worst case or most restrictive with respect to internal configuration elevation and portal size These characteristics according to OSHA should be considered when deciding whether a space is truly representative of an actual permit space Roco Note Practice in portals that are greater than 24 inches is also important so that rescuers can practice using all proper patient packaging protocols that may be allowed with larger size openings 1 Internal Configuration If the interior of the space is congested with utilities or other structural components that may hinder movement or the ability to efficiently package a patient it must be addressed in training For example will the use of entrant rescuer retrieval lines be feasible After one or two 90 degree turns around corners or around structural members the ability to provide external retrieval of the entrant rescuer is probably forfeited For vertical rescue if there are offset platforms or passageways there may be a need for directional pulleys or intermediate haul systems that are operated inside the space What about rescues while on emergency breathing air If the internal configuration is so congested that the time required to complete patient packaging exceeds the duration of a backpack SCBA then the team should consider using SAR Will the internal configuration hinder or prevent visual monitoring and communications with the entrant rescuers If so it may be advisable to use an internal hole watch to provide a communication link between the entrant rescuers and personnel outside the space What if the internal configuration is such that complete patient packaging is not possible inside the space This may dictate a load and go type rescue that provides minimal patient packaging while providing as much stabilization as feasible through the use of extrication type short spine boards as an example 2 Elevation If the portal is 4 feet or greater above grade the rescue team must be capable of providing an effective and safe high angle lower of the victim and if needed an attendant rescuer This may require additional training and equipment For these situations it is important to identify high point anchors that may be suitable for use or plan for portable high point anchors such as a knuckle lift or some other device 3 Portal Size The magic number is 24 inches or less in diameter for round

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tips-for-using-roco-s-confined-space-types-chart (2016-02-15)
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  • OSHA's Confined Spaces in Construction Rule Under OMB Review
    14 The office is limited to a 90 day review but can request an extension The rule has been in the works since at least 2003 the proposed rule was published in 2007 Several provisions in the proposed rule are similar to those found in the agency s confined spaces standard for general industry That rule issued in 1993 mandates specific procedures and includes requirements such as a written program atmospheric monitoring and training Stand by for additional updates on this regulation News story from the National Safety Council Previous Next New Stuff Atmospheric Monitors May NOT Detect All Dangers Roco QUICK DRILL 10 Tripod Quick Drill Service Life Guidelines for Rescue Equipment NFPA Issues New Guide for Confined Spaces Gravedigger Engulfed In Cave in of Unguarded Grave Hot Topics ATMOSPHERIC HAZARDS 6 CONFINED SPACE 58 EQUIPMENT 36 FALL PROTECTION 16 FIRE FIGHTERS 1 HOW TO VIDEOS 6 INCIDENTS 27 MISCELLANEOUS 40 NEWS 90 OSHA MEMORANDUM 2 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 36 QUICK DRILLS 12 REGULATIONS 31 SAFETY 55 STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE 5 TECHNIQUES 23 TRAINING 6 TRENCH 10 RescueTalk RocoRescue com has been created as a free resource for sharing insightful information news views and commentary for our students and others

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/oshas-confined-spaces-in-construction-rule-under-omb-review (2016-02-15)
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