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  • Roco CustomerLogin
    personal data with anyone This is a convenience for our customers but you do not have to create an account to make purchases on this website Roco Customer LOGIN If you already have an account sign in here You can

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/login (2016-02-15)
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  • Atmospheric Monitors May NOT Detect All Dangers
    space We get dependent on these monitors to tell us if it s safe to enter without respiratory protection and there may be much more to the story OSHA s Respiratory Standard 1910 134 d 1 III specifies Where the employer cannot identify or reasonably estimate the employee exposure the employer shall consider the atmosphere to be IDLH In the above statement if you substitute Team Leader for employer and Rescue Team for employee you may find that you cannot identify or reasonably estimate the employee exposure Therefore rescuers would need to use SCBA SAR and other PPE until you can completely identify what hazards are in the space even though typical monitoring devices are telling us that all is well While your standard 4 gas meter is an important screening tool it is NOT a catch all for every atmospheric hazard Remember that NIOSH statistics indicate that 40 60 of confined space entry fatalities are would be rescuers including both dedicated on site standby teams and off site professional rescuers municipalities who attempt to perform a confined space rescues But let s take this a step further If you ask most rescuers at what O2 level does an atmosphere become dangerous they will say below 19 5 I know from my initial hazmat confined space training on 4 gas monitors included oxygen displacement It was so elegantly described to me as if your monitor shows a decrease in oxygen it is telling you that something else has pushed out that percentage of oxygen and replaced it with some other agent Now it would be up to you to figure out what else is in the air For example normal breathing air is 20 9 To get a reading of 19 5 means that about 1 4 of something else has displaced the oxygen Then depending on what that something else is could require the use of respiratory protection Hey wait the good news keeps coming and I am getting in way over my head on this science stuff but my high school chemistry teacher should still be proud Ambient air is made up of about 79 nitrogen and other gases and 21 oxygen So using fingers and toes mathematics that equals about a 4 1 ratio of nitrogen to oxygen In other words if we have a 1 displacement of oxygen from the breathing air it will be accompanied by about a 4 displacement of nitrogen both gases displace at about the same rate Therefore instead of it being about a 1 4 percent of an unknown product in our breathing air it could be as much as 5 6 or more And depending on what that product is it could already be at its IDLH level Project Scientist Spencer Pizzani of Weston Solutions provides this insight While many rescuers are habituated to only watch oxygen O2 percent composition this can be deceptive The OSHA standard for O2 concentration is based on standard temperatures and pressures at sea level

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/atmospheric-monitors-may-not-detect-all-dangers (2016-02-15)
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  • Tripod Quick Drill
    within the legs of the tripod to prevent tipping h Insure correct assembly including the use of the tripod s chain to prevent overspreading the legs of the tripod Now that your tripod is assembled move on to rigging Rigging Rig each of the following systems and raise and lower a load weight This shows the pros and cons of operating each system Show how the resultant forces can be applied by the haul position or by patient movement outside the tripod footprint In most cases there are three rigging options for tripod operations Rig each while discussing each method s strengths and weaknesses 1 Block and Tackle System a Often pre rigged and therefore rapid to deploy b Will the length of the collapsed system create height constraints to remove the victim from the space c Does the height of the tripod create any issues operating the cam of the system d Rope length vs depth of space what strength M A will you be able to build e Can the haul team keep resultant haul forces within the legs or footprint of the tripod to prevent tipping or do we need to have a change of direction pulley 2 Single Main Line with COD change of direction within the Tripod s Footprint a Better option when the tripod s height and victim clearance are concerns b Enables the lower haul team to operate remote of the space c Necessitates an anchor point within the tripod s footprint and an anchor point for the main line d Allows for reaching greater depths than a block and tackle system e Single line entering the space and allows for attachment of patient air bottle f Takes more time to rig 3 Pass Through Method a A solution when the block and

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tripod-quick-drill (2016-02-15)
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  • Service Life of Rescue Equipment
    are noted then the item should be retired and destroyed immediately It is important to remember that an accurate history should be maintained for all life safety rope products The date of manufacture should be identified and recorded as products are being put into service Equipment inspectors or users should ensure that these products do not exceed their service life As with harnesses the amount type and conditions of use can drastically reduce the service life of these products Carabiners Since carabiners are metallic they do not fall under the ASTM service life recommendation of 10 years As long as these products are in serviceable condition and properly maintained they have an infinite service life Even though they do not have a dedicated service life term it is still important to conduct the same pre post use and annual inspections Some conditions that would require the equipment such as carabiners to be retired from service include Carabiner has been dropped a significant distance Exposed to heat sufficient enough to alter the surface appearance Cracks distortion or deep gouges Corrosion or deep pitted rust Note Surface rust may be removed with a fine abrasive cloth and coated with a preservative such as LPS 1 Sharp edges that could cause damage to life safety rope minor edges may be smoothed with the same process as rust removal Gate does not line up when closed Gate action does not return to closed position when opened and released Locking mechanism does not fully engage Complete history of use cannot be determined If any of these conditions exist the equipment should be removed from service and destroyed Records of use and inspection should be kept on these items even though the service life of the product is infinite Pulleys Pulleys as with carabiners are metallic in construction and do not have a service life recommendation They will also have an infinite service life as long as they are in serviceable condition and are properly maintained Pulleys fall under the same inspection requirements as carabiners Below are some conditions that would require such equipment to be removed from service Pulley has been dropped a significant distance Exposed to heat sufficient enough to alter the surface appearance Cracks dents or elongation at the carabiner hole on side plates Corrosion or deep pitted rust Note Surface rust may be removed with a fine abrasive cloth and coated with a preservative such as LPS 1 Deep scratches or gouges to side plates or sheave s Sharp edges that could cause damage to life safety rope minor edges may be smoothed with the same process as rust removal Side plates that do not line up at the carabiner hole Elongation of the side plates at the sheave pin Side plates that do not move freely Sheave does not turn freely or significantly rubs against side plate If the item has been subjected to shock loads fall loads or abuse If the history of use or manufacture date cannot be determined

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/crucial-life-safety-equipment-inspections (2016-02-15)
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  • NFPA Issues New Guide for Confined Spaces
    ensure personnel safety However these regulations tell you what to do not how to identify evaluate and control confined space hazards or conduct rescue response NFPA has just introduced NFPA 350 Guide for Safe Confined Space Entry and Work This all new guide is essential for anyone who enters confined spaces along with facility managers code officials and safety personnel NFPA 350 explains how to protect workers who enter into confined spaces for inspection or testing or to perform associated work Provisions address the full range of special hazards including those present in water treatment petrochemical and agricultural facilities It provides information to assist companies that need to comply with OSHA s Permit Rquired Confined Spaces 29 CFR 1910 146 among other standards In addition NFPA 350 helps fire service and emergency services personnel develop and evaluate plans for confined space rescue in conjunction with NFPA 1670 Standard on Operations and Training for Technical Search and Rescue Incidents This guide will help you be prepared to recognize evaluate and control confined space entry hazards Follow practices developed by experts for Identification of Confined Spaces Evaluation of Hazards Atmospheric Monitoring Hazard Elimination and Control Ventilation Rescue and Rescue Planning Confined Space Personnel Duties Responsibilities and Competencies Pre Entry Evaluation Forms and Permits Management of Change Prevention Through Design OSHA Alternate Entry Procedures and Reclassification Annex C As an added note NFPA 350 looks at all confined spaces from a different prospective i e all spaces are treated as permit required until it is proven that entry is safe or the proper precautions have been taken This guide s impact in confined space work and rescue will be significant in reducing risk and meeting compliance issues For more information visit NFPA org Previous Next New Stuff Atmospheric Monitors May NOT Detect All

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/nfpa-issues-new-guide-for-confined-spaces (2016-02-15)
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  • Gravedigger Engulfed In Cave-in of Unguarded Grave
    but you re wrong During my tenure as a rescuer in NYC I responded to a number of these jobs and they present some additional hazards that are not associated with most trench rescue jobs You can call it what you want but a grave is a trench And the location can make a big difference in terms of hazards presented For example I have a house in NY and one in Louisiana in South Louisiana we try to bury people above ground if possible However in places like NY cemetery space is so limited It s like high rises in the city our cemetery family plots bury multiple family members usually 3 on top of the other which is referred to as a triple depth grave This pushes the grave depth to about 8 feet for the first entombment So no matter what you call it a trench is a trench and we need to follow OSHA 1926 651 652 requirements for protecting workers Let s look at some of the grave trench basics before we move on to the specific grave hazard If we dig an excavation that is longer than it is wide it is a considered a trench if it is 4 or deeper you need to have a ladder or other means of egress for workers if it is 5 or deeper you need to install a protective system You must have a Competent Person as defined by OSHA to determine what system is adequate and that it is installed properly They must also inspect the trench and surrounding area for hazards before workers can enter the trench Of course there s a lot more to digging a trench and the responsibilities of the competent person but you get the idea Also just because a trench is only 7 long and 3 wide this does not change the rules or responsibilities associated with digging a trench If you re digging a trench you need to have that competent person you need to understand the requirements of 1926 651 652 and you need to know who will respond if you have a trench emergency Keep in mind most municipal departments especially volunteer departments do not have the training or equipment to respond to a trench collapse Ok the added hazard to a grave collapse rescue is the headstone at the end of the grave depending on the size they can weigh over 1 000lbs If it has fallen in the grave on top of the victim then you will need to use technical rescue techniques and equipment to lift and free the victim If it is still on the edge you will need to support stabilize or remove it before rescuers can work under it So even an innocent grave can be the scene of a complicated technical trench rescue Bottom line if you are digging trenches for whatever reason or you have contractors digging trenches on your property you need to be aware of the

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/gravedigger-engulfed-in-cave-in-of-unguarded-grave (2016-02-15)
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  • OSHA’s Confined Space Standard for Construction
    Industry regulation It is required due to the ever changing makeup of the construction workforce and most especially when the need for workers from multiple employers must enter permit spaces at the same time or perform work activities in the vicinity of the permit space thus the potential to introduce new hazards to the space that all employers on site must be aware of and prepare for This final provision differs from 1910 146 d 11 by specifically addressing the need to coordinate work activities through the controlling contractor as well as with employers working outside the permit space when their work could foreseeably affect conditions within a confined space The new construction industry standard goes far beyond by outlining the need for coordinated activities between multiple employers by identifying specific roles host employer controlling contractor and the entry employer Refer to Chart OSHA 1926 1203 General Requirements paragraph h includes specific communication and coordination requirements between the various employers and contractors The host employer must provide certain information they may have about confined spaces to the controlling contractor Required information includes items such as a The location of known permit spaces b The nature of hazards in those identified permit spaces c The reason for classifying the space as permit required and d Any additional precautions that the host employer any other controlling contractor or entry employer have previously employed to protect their employees must be provided It is also incumbent upon the controlling contractor to obtain information from the host employer regarding the hazards associated with the permit spaces and any information on previous entry operations into that permit space The controlling contractor is responsible for passing information to any entry employer that may authorize entry into that permit space as well to any other entity at the worksite that could foreseeably create a hazard that may affect that confined space The entry employer must obtain from the controlling contractor all the information regarding the particular permit space hazards and entry operation information Additionally the entry employer must inform the controlling contractor of the provisions of their permit required confined space program and any hazards they expect to confront or create during their entry operations It is also very important that the controlling contractor and all entry employers coordinate their activities when multiple entry employers have entrants in the same space or when other activities around the permit space may create a hazard that affects the confined space entry operation At the completion of entry operations it is equally important that all entities including entry employers and controlling contractors communicate information regarding the particulars of any given entry This information must include the permit space program followed during the entry operation as well as any hazards confronted or created during entry Of particular importance is to communicate any hazards created within the confined space that may still be in place The controlling contractor in turn communicates all of this information to the host employer 3 Requires a Competent

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/osha-confined-space-standard-for-construction (2016-02-15)
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  • NEW! OSHA Confined Spaces in Construction Poster Download
    in of Unguarded Grave Hot Topics ATMOSPHERIC HAZARDS 6 CONFINED SPACE 58 EQUIPMENT 36 FALL PROTECTION 16 FIRE FIGHTERS 1 HOW TO VIDEOS 6 INCIDENTS 27 MISCELLANEOUS 40 NEWS 90 OSHA MEMORANDUM 2 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 36 QUICK DRILLS 12 REGULATIONS 31 SAFETY 55 STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE 5 TECHNIQUES 23 TRAINING 6 TRENCH 10 RescueTalk RocoRescue com has been created as a free resource for sharing insightful information news views and

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/new-osha-confined-spaces-in-construction-poster-download (2016-02-15)
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