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  • How much training is needed for attendants on air monitoring equipment?
    the customer s internal company policy and or person s issuing the monitor We also spoke to a few of our instructors who work at different plants and refineries The majority of these companies require a company employee to perform the initial monitoring and then again after a break in work greater than 30 minutes In addition they review with the attendant what to look for and what to do if there are changes in the readings or an alarm sounds One company provides a four hour PowerPoint presentation on monitoring and attendant responsibilities OSHA does not indicate a time frame for this training either However it does require that persons be capable of safely performing the tasks assigned Therefore I would say your best bet would be to cover as much of the manufacturer s instructions as possible along with reviewing the most common problems such as Calibration conversions Turning on the monitor or field zeroing in the presence of contaminates Negative LEL or negative toxic readings Contaminated sampling hoses Clogged filters Lastly I would stress to the attendants the importance of contacting a supervisor if they have any questions or concerns and if they get any unusual results from the monitor Do not hesitate to have everyone exit the space while the results are investigated Previous Next New Stuff Atmospheric Monitors May NOT Detect All Dangers Roco QUICK DRILL 10 Tripod Quick Drill Service Life Guidelines for Rescue Equipment NFPA Issues New Guide for Confined Spaces Gravedigger Engulfed In Cave in of Unguarded Grave Hot Topics ATMOSPHERIC HAZARDS 6 CONFINED SPACE 58 EQUIPMENT 36 FALL PROTECTION 16 FIRE FIGHTERS 1 HOW TO VIDEOS 6 INCIDENTS 27 MISCELLANEOUS 40 NEWS 90 OSHA MEMORANDUM 2 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 36 QUICK DRILLS 12 REGULATIONS 31 SAFETY 55 STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE 5 TECHNIQUES

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/how_much_training_is_needed_for_attendants_on_air_monitoring_equipment (2016-02-15)
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  • Why does the carbon monoxide sensor indicate the presence of CO when there is no potential for CO in the atmosphere?
    of the current electro mechanical CO sensors will give a false indication of CO when exposed to solvents and especially when exposed to isopropyl alcohol If the potential for CO presence can be definitively ruled out consider using an atmospheric monitor with no CO sensor Previous Next New Stuff Atmospheric Monitors May NOT Detect All Dangers Roco QUICK DRILL 10 Tripod Quick Drill Service Life Guidelines for Rescue Equipment NFPA Issues New Guide for Confined Spaces Gravedigger Engulfed In Cave in of Unguarded Grave Hot Topics ATMOSPHERIC HAZARDS 6 CONFINED SPACE 58 EQUIPMENT 36 FALL PROTECTION 16 FIRE FIGHTERS 1 HOW TO VIDEOS 6 INCIDENTS 27 MISCELLANEOUS 40 NEWS 90 OSHA MEMORANDUM 2 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 36 QUICK DRILLS 12 REGULATIONS 31 SAFETY 55 STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE 5 TECHNIQUES 23 TRAINING 6 TRENCH 10 RescueTalk RocoRescue com has been created as a free resource for sharing insightful information news views and commentary for our students and others who are interested in technical rope rescue Therefore we make no representations as to accuracy completeness or suitability of any information and are not liable for any errors omissions or delays in this information or any losses injuries or damages arising from its display

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/why_does_the_carbon_monoxide_sensor_indicate_the_presence_of_co_when_there_is_no_potential_for_co_in (2016-02-15)
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  • RescueTalk™
    litter or backboard and the victim s chest except for our more petite victims And it s already difficult to negotiate a portal while wearing a backpack SCBA For portals of 24 inches or less it is nearly impossible DO NOT under any circumstances remove your backpack SCBA in order gain access to a confined space through a restricted portal or passageway If the backpack SCBA will not fit it is time to consider an airline respirator and emergency escape harness bottle instead By using the Roco Types Chart in preplanning these worst case portals and the spaces that fall into the type 1 3 or 5 categories the rescue team will be able to determine in advance that different equipment or techniques may be required in order to effect rescue through these type portals ROCO NOTE In Appendix F OSHA uses less than 24 inches in Section B 8 however in 3 Portal Size a Restricted it uses 24 inches or less which we are using in our Types Chart 4 Space Access Horizontal vs Vertical Most rescuers regard horizontal retrievals as easier than vertical This is not always the case If there are floor projections pipe work or other utilities or just a grated floor surface it may create an incredible amount of friction or an absolute impediment to the horizontal movement of an inert victim In this case the entrant rescuers may have to rely on old fashioned arm and leg strength to maneuver the victim Once the victim is moved to the portal it may become an incredibly difficult task to lift a harnessed victim up and over the lower edge of the portal Even if the portal is as little as three feet above the level of the victim it is very difficult to lift a victim s dead weight up and over the portal lower edge Sometimes using a long backboard as an internal ramp may do the trick For vertical access there may be a need for additional training or equipment to provide the lifting or lowering capability for both the victim and the entrant rescuer Appropriate rescue pre plans and realistic rescue practice can be one of the best ways to be prepared for confined space rescues and allow rescuers to operate more safely and effectively in an emergency situation Roco CS Types Chart can be used as a quick reference when doing an initial assessment of confined spaces and permit required confined spaces It helps in designing rescue training and practice drills that will truly prepare rescuers for the particular spaces on site The information can also be used when conducting performance evaluations for your team a contracted stand by rescue service a local off site response team or a contractor who supplies their own rescue services while working in your plant In section k OSHA requires employers to evaluate the prospective rescue service to determine proficiency in terms of rescue related tasks and proper equipment If you are relying on a contracted rescue service or if an on site contractor is providing their own rescue capabilities we encourage you to have them perform a simulated rescue from a representative type space Otherwise if an incident occurs and the rescuers you are depending on are not capable of safely performing a rescue your company could be culpable read more Confined Space Attendants Play a Crucial Role Tuesday July 08 2014 The following article was featured in the July 2014 issue of ISHN and authored by Roco s own Chief Instructor Pat Furr Have you ever wondered who that person is who hovers around the portal of a permit space while workers are in the space What does a Confined Space Attendant often referred to as the Hole Watch do anyway What may seem like a cushy job is actually a critical safety responsibility Here s why First OSHA instituted regulations regarding Permit Required Confined Spaces 1910 146 due to the high number of serious injuries and deaths in confined spaces Entering these spaces is dangerous business and the attendant serves as the safety watchman for entrants as well as those who may casually try to enter This also applies in an emergency situation when others may be tempted but unqualified to enter the space to rescue a co worker OSHA requires that the attendant be able to safely and effectively perform the duties required in Section i of 1910 146 See Duties of the Confined Space Attendant Once a permit is issued and work begins the attendant needs to be aware of his or her surroundings and be diligent in monitoring the space and entrants at all times This individual is not there to be a gofer for workers inside the space Get real If entrants need assistance or an emergency situation develops inside or outside the space that requires entrants to be evacuated the attendant is the vital link Unfortunately it is common practice to fill the Hole Watch position with the least experienced or greenest person on the crew Many times this person has no idea what is expected of them They also may not be aware of potential hazards inside the space or hazards that may be introduced as work is performed Often these individuals are not experienced in industrial environments and are not properly trained in the OSHA required duties And in most cases they don t realize how critical their duties could become in an emergency when split second decisions are required Train your attendants It is unrealistic to expect a new employee to perform these duties without receiving appropriate training and being granted the authority to take action as needed In 1910 146 d 8 OSHA is specific in its requirements for the various roles involved in conducting safe permit entry operations Employers are required to provide adequate training and ensure that personnel are capable of performing their duties At minimum the regulation requires employers to ensure that each Hole Watch Attendant knows and understands the following safety precautions 1 Hazards that may be faced during entry including information on the mode signs or symptoms and consequences of exposure to those hazards 2 Possible behavioral effects of hazard exposure for the authorized entrants Additional duties and responsibilities include 1 Continuously maintaining an accurate count of entrants in the permit space 2 Performing non entry rescues as specified by the employer s rescue procedure One of the most critical duties of the attendant is to be able to effectively communicate with entrants and take appropriate actions in an emergency Communications are required to monitor the status of the entrants and to ensure that there are no signs of exposure to hazards The attendant must recognize this need and be able to order evacuation of the space Most importantly the confined space attendant can perform NO duties that might interfere with their primary duty to monitor and protect the entrants Prevent fatalities Employers must ask themselves Will the person designated as the Hole Watch be able to react in an effective manner when the pressure is on Will they be able to initiate a non entry rescue in an emergency situation Again we witness too many instances where the Hole Watch has little or no knowledge of the responsibilities assigned while some have had virtually no training whatsoever Sometimes it seems they are there for no other reason than to fill a square to meet an OSHA requirement Many times the lack of understanding regarding confined space hazards combined with the lack of a clear understanding of emergency actions to be taken as well as actions to avoid can lead to confined space fatalities both for the entrants as well as the attendant We urge employers to take a serious look at the selection and training of confined space attendants These individuals must be capable responsible and properly trained as spelled out in the OSHA standard When things go wrong in a confined space the actions or inaction of the attendant can be the difference between life and death for the entrants They must have the knowledge the tools and the experience to function as an effective and ultimately safe Hole Watch About the Author Pat Furr is a chief instructor and technical consultant for Roco Rescue Inc Pat teaches a wide variety of technical rescue classes including Confined Space Rescue Rope Access Tower Work Rescue Fall Protection and Suspended Worker Rescue He is also involved in research and development writing articles and presenting at national conferences He is a member of the NFPA 1006 Technical Rescuer Professional Qualifications Standard read more Ready Set Go to Challenge Friday May 23 2014 Don t Miss the Rescue Team Event of the Year 2014 Roco Rescue Challenge October 8 9 2014 RTC Roco Training Center Rescue teams from across the country will participate in realistic confined space rescue exercises designed by Roco s top instructors And although Challenge is more of a learning event than a competition trophies will be awarded to the teams with top scores for individual skills proficiency and the infamous Yellow Brick Road rescue relay scenario Roco Rescue Challenge meets the annual rescue practice requirements of 1910 146 while providing realistic practice drills in all six confined space types Written documentation will be provided to each team following the event All rescue teams are welcome and observer registration is available This two day event definitely puts industrial rescue teams to the test The event is limited to six 6 teams only so reserve space NOW To register your team join us as an observer or receive more information CALL 800 647 7626 CHECK OUT THE 2013 Roco Rescue Challenge Video Benefits Learn from participating in realistic rescue scenarios Gain confidence in your skills and teamwork abilities Enjoy excellent training while interacting with rescue pros Share ideas experiences and techniques with teams from across the nation OSHA Compliance Document your team s confined space response capabilities Meet annual practice requirements in varying confined spaces types Confirm individual skills proficiency This photo gallery has no pictures Download Challenge Site Sheet 2014 read more Confined Space Rescue Non entry or Entry Rescue Monday April 14 2014 The following article was featured on the cover of the March 2014 issue of ISHN and authored by Roco s own Chief Instructor Pat Furr It s a Saturday night December 21st and the plant is running on a skeleton crew Operations wants to get a head start on annual preventative maintenance and decides to knock out several permit required confined space entries before the majority of the work is to be done when the regular shifts return after the New Year Randy has just finished the third of five vessels that are identical in configuration His authorized attendant and good friend Hector have been working together for over 15 years and they both know the drill They have changed out the stainless steel bolt sets on the agitator blades of these vessels every year at about this same time The entry supervisor just closed out the permit for the third vessel and after reviewing the permit for the fourth vessel and helping with the pre entry atmospheric monitoring he signs the permit authorizing entry Hector checks Randy s harness and the attachment of the non entry rescue retrieval cable to his dorsal D ring and double checks the davit arm and the mounting point of the self retracting lifeline with the built in retrieval winch As Randy climbs 25 feet down the rope ladder to access the bottom of the vessel all is going according to plan As he steps off the ladder and begins to loosen the first bolt set he slips on the concave floor of the stainless steel vessel Before he can react he strikes his head on the agitator blade which causes a 5 inch gash to his left temple and knocks him unconscious He falls between two of the agitator blades and then slides to the bottom of the vessel with his retrieval line wrapped over one of the blades and under another Hector tries to winch his friend out of the space only to find that Randy s limp body gets wedged under the agitator blade You can probably guess what happened next Realizing there is no entry rescue capability on this shift Hector s gut reaction is to enter the space to help his friend In his rush he slips from the rope ladder and falls 20 feet to his death When the entry supervisor arrives 30 minutes later to close the permit and initiate the last entry he sees two bodies at the bottom of the space Understand OSHA rescue requirements Are there permit required confined spaces at your worksite Are employees allowed to enter these spaces If you answered yes to these two questions it is critically important to understand the OSHA requirements for rescue As part of a written permit space program the employer must Develop and implement procedures for summoning rescue and emergency services for rescuing entrants from permit spaces for providing necessary emergency services to rescued employees and for preventing unauthorized personnel from attempting a rescue When considering what methods should be used for rescuing authorized entrants the safety of the rescuer s should be considered as important as the effectiveness of the rescue technique If it is possible to perform non entry rescue of the entrant s that should always be the first choice It s always a given keep additional personnel even rescuers out of the space unless absolutely necessary It is important to consider potential scenarios that could arise when determining if non entry or retrieval rescue is sufficient Non entry rescue What are the requirements for non entry rescue OSHA states To facilitate non entry rescue retrieval systems or methods shall be used whenever an authorized entrant enters a permit space unless the retrieval equipment would increase the overall risk of entry or would not contribute to the rescue of the entrant Let s examine this further What conditions would preclude the use of non entry retrieval systems Here are some guidelines that OSHA will use to make this determination A permit space with obstructions or turns that prevent pull on the retrieval line from being transmitted to the entrant does not require the use of a retrieval system A permit space from which an employee being rescued with the retrieval system would be injured because of forceful contact with projections in the space does not require the use of a retrieval system A permit space that was entered by an entrant using an air supplied respirator does not require the use of a retrieval system if the retrieval line could not be controlled so as to prevent entanglement hazards with the air line Assess the space The ONLY way to determine if a non entry retrieval system will provide adequate safety for entrants and satisfy OSHA s requirement is to perform an honest and thorough assessment This assessment should provide careful consideration for the capabilities and limitations of the retrieval system for any planned or unplanned condition that may arise during entry We have all heard of Murphy s Law and most of us have experienced the effects of that particular law I encourage you to remember that Murphy is always lurking close by So when evaluating these spaces to determine if non entry or entry rescue is the appropriate choice always ask yourself what if For the fictitious accident that opened this article the plan was to do all the work on the near side of the agitator blade directly below the top portal In that case it would have been safe to assume non entry retrieval was the only plan needed for rescue Enter Murphy Was the rescue plan developed with the assumption that the planned work activities would always ensure the successful use of the retrieval system but failed to consider the what ifs Some might say that we can what if things to death Let s turn that around we SHOULD what if these questions in an effort to PREVENT death When evaluating permit spaces to determine the appropriate rescue capability please explore those what ifs This is not to say that in the case cited above that the only option would have been entry rescue That may not be necessary and if the non entry retrieval system would have worked then there is no need to expose rescuers to the hazards of entering the permit space But there was a potential for the condition to change and it sure did So recognizing that potential an entry rescue capability should have been planned in the event that the change in conditions rendered the non entry rescue system ineffective Backup plan The point of this article is to consider non entry rescue as the default for assisted permit space rescue unless the conditions cited by OSHA are present At that point entry rescue must be planned But this isn t necessarily a one or the other choice As we can see from this story it is sometimes best to plan for non entry rescue as the primary technique but if there is any reasonable potential for an unplanned change in conditions then an entry rescue capability must be in place as a back up About the Author Pat Furr is a chief instructor and technical consultant for Roco Rescue Inc As a chief instructor Pat teaches a wide variety of technical rescue classes including Confined Space Rescue Rope Access Tower Work Rescue Fall Protection and Suspended Worker Rescue In his role as technical consultant he is involved in research and development writing articles and presenting at national conferences He is also a member of the NFPA 1006 Technical Rescuer Professional Qualifications Standard Prior to joining Roco in 2000 Pat served 20 years in the US Air Force as a Pararescueman PJ read more Register NOW for Roco s Fast Track 80

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/confined_space/page/2/ (2016-02-15)
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  • RescueTalk™
    last year Here is a little background Last July 2011 we brought you a story entitled What s the talk about individual retrieval lines At the heart of the issue was a pending LOI from OSHA regarding how retrieval lines are used inside confined spaces Note This LOI is pending and has not been published in the Federal Register Here s the question to OSHA from a gentleman in Maryland which initiated the LOI Does OSHA 1910 146 k 3 require that each individual entrant including workers and or rescuers entering into a confined space be provided with an independent retrieval line or can more than one entrant be connected to a single retrieval line The proposed answer from OSHA stated that each entrant should have an individual retrieval line despite the fact that the word individual is not included in this section of the standard 1910 146 k 3 i Roco then wrote a letter to OSHA requesting clarification about the forthcoming LOI A portion of our letter stated that This pending interpretation is different from our understanding of what s required by the regulation While this particular technique is one option of providing external retrieval there are other alternatives currently being used by rescuers One of the techniques being used is a single retrieval line for multiple entrant rescuers The first rescuer to enter the space is attached to the retrieval line via an end of line Figure 8 on a Bight Any subsequent rescuers enter the space attached to the same retrieval line using mid line Butterfly knots In our opinion this satisfies the intent of the regulation in that each entrant is attached to a retrieval line However in the case of multiple entrants requiring individual lines as mentioned in the proposed LOI may represent an entanglement hazard This in effect may cause entrants to opt out of using retrieval lines due to potential entanglement hazards which is allowed by the standard if entanglement hazards are a concern So in our opinion this effort to bring more clarity to the issue may further complicate the matter Again we believe the single retrieval line method described above is one way to rescue entrants while satisfying the intent of the standard at the same time More background is available by reading our original story Fast forward back to July 2012 the demonstration lasted about four hours During this time Roco demonstrated numerous retrieval line techniques as well as the pros and cons for each system There was a great deal of discussion back and forth on how this pending letter of interpretation could affect rescuers and entrants and their ability to perform their jobs safely and efficiently We would like to thank OSHA for allowing us to offer our feedback concerning this topic We also want to say a special thanks to the Baltimore Fire Department for allowing us to use their training facilities We don t know when a final LOI will be issued but we will keep you posted read more LAFD promotes Confined Space Awareness Tuesday June 26 2012 It is our experience that the victims would be rescuers and co workers either fail to adhere to their emergency plans or simply do not have a plan in place with catastrophic results In the last year alone we have responded to three confined space rescues Battalion Chief Jack Wise of the Los Angeles Fire Department Joint Effort for Confined Space Awareness Education The California Department of Industrial Relations Division of Occupational Safety and Health Cal OSHA joined forces March 28 with the Los Angeles Fire Department to urge employers and employees to prepare properly for working in confined spaces Officials from both agencies participated in a news conference where LAFD personnel gave a confined space rescue demonstration and potential hazards were explained Cal OSHA launched a statewide confined space education and awareness campaign in February after seven confined space deaths and numerous injuries in 2011 Illustrating the variety of industries where confined spaces are common those deaths occurred at a Fortune 500 pharmaceutical facility a winery a paint manufacturing plant and a recycling center Today s event with the Los Angeles Fire Department helps raise awareness of the hazards associated with working in confined space environments and the need for employers to have an effective emergency response plan in place before a critical situation arises DIR Director Christine Baker said As a national leader in workplace safety Cal OSHA is working with labor employers and public safety officials to eliminate this type of preventable fatality in the workplace Some of the 2011 fatalities involved potential rescuers attempting to aid someone who had collapsed in a confined space These confined space deaths and serious injuries were all preventable had safety practices been in place It is even more tragic that in many cases workers attempting to rescue their co workers also fall victim said Cal OSHA Chief Ellen Widess Confined spaces can be deceptively dangerous Employers need to assess if they have such a hazard identify and mark those spaces and provide employee and supervisor training and on site rescue plans and equipment Cal OSHA has posted extensive information about confined space hazards on its website at http ohsonline com articles 2012 03 30 la fire department boosts confined space awareness aspx read more New Study Relying on Municipal Rescuers for Confined Space Response Tuesday May 22 2012 A study on the reliance of municipal fire departments for confined space response has been funded by a legal settlement following the deaths of two workers in a confined space incident in California Research by the University of California Berkeley indicates that employers may be relying too heavily on local fire departments for confined space rescue These findings indicate that local fire departments may not have the resources to provide the specialized training needed for confined space rescue especially when response and rescue times are such critical factors Key Points from Study Confined space incidents represent a small but continuing source of fatal occupational injuries A sizeable portion of employers may be relying on public fire departments for permit required confined space response and With life threatening emergencies fire departments usually are not able to effect a confined space rescue in a timely manner Municipal Response Statistics The study includes some very interesting statistics about fire department response times rescue times and capabilities It also shows that rescue times increase dramatically when hazardous materials are present For example according to the report fire department confined space rescue time estimates ranged from 48 to 123 min and increased to 70 and 173 min when hazardous materials were present According to the report estimates made by fire officers show that a worker who experiences cardiac arrest deprivation of cerebral oxygen or some other highly time critical life threatening emergency during a confined space entry will almost certainly die if the employer s emergency response plan relies solely on the fire department for rescue services Researchers proposed that a more appropriate role for fire departments would be to support a properly trained and equipped on site rescue team and to provide life support following a rescue Information excerpted from Confined Space Emergency Response Assessing Employer and Fire Department Practices by Michael P Wilson Heather N Madison Stephen B Healy 2012 This study was published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene Feb 2012 and is available for purchase from Taylor Francis Online read more Multiple Confined Space Entries Tuesday May 08 2012 QUESTION What is required for making multiple confined space entries and can an Attendant Hole Watch monitor more than one entry at a time ANSWER Good question And the answer is YES according to OSHA 1910 146 However each space must be evaluated on its own merits with all regulations and requirements applying to each individual entry Here we will provide some tips when considering one Attendant for multiple entries This is also where preparing comprehensive rescue preplans becomes essential and we ll start there Suggestions for Writing Rescue Preplans 1 One of the first things is to identify and categorize the space as permit required or non permit required You ll need to carefully consider the possible hazards based on the information gathered 2 Once you ve identified the hazards you ll want to consider what actions might be taken to eliminate or control the hazard to allow for a safe entry OSHA 1910 146 defines acceptable entry conditions as the conditions that must exist in a permit space to allow entry and to ensure that employees involved with a permit required confined space entry can safely enter into and work within the space 3 Next you would need to consider the type of work that is going to take place inside the space A very important question to ask could the work create its own hazard An example would include hot work being performed inside the space Then what about rescue capabilities and requirements Next you ll need to determine whether the entry should be considered Rescue Available or Rescue Stand by Roco uses the terms Rescue Available or Rescue Stand by to better prepare for safe entry operations and in determining more specific rescue needs for that particular entry Here s the way we use these distinctions Rescue Available would be your normal entry that is NOT considered an IDLH Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health entry In this case a 10 15 minute response time for a rescue team would generally be sufficient to satisfy OSHA regulations and is typical during turnarounds where multiple entries are taking place On the other hand we use Rescue Stand by when a more immediate need is anticipated such as with a hazardous atmosphere or potentially hazardous atmosphere For example with an IDLH entry it may require the team to be standing by just outside the space in order to reach the patient in a timely manner i e how long can you live without air 3 to 4 minutes Or how quickly can the entrant be engulfed where there is a potential engulfment hazard OSHA 1910 134 requires a standby person or persons capable of immediate action with IDLH atmospheres See reference below OSHA Reference Note to Paragraph k 1 i What will be considered timely will vary according to the specific hazards involved in each entry For example 1910 134 Respiratory Protection requires that employers provide a standby person or persons capable of immediate action to rescue employee s wearing respiratory protection while in work areas defined as IDLH atmospheres Regarding multiple entries this Rescue Stand by status could certainly limit the number of entries that could take place due to the availability of qualified responders and equipment You must also consider that if you re doing an entry that requires Rescue Stand by and are called to respond to a rescue from a Rescue Available space the entrants at the Rescue Stand by entry must be evacuated before the team can respond And if there is only one rescue team all other entries must stop during a rescue as the team is no longer available Can an Attendant cover more than one confined space entry at the same time According to OSHA see below attendants can cover multiple spaces as long as they meet the responsibilities and duties at each entry site If the spaces are Rescue Available and are in close proximity this may be possible However without seeing the spaces and if they are on different levels as you mentioned it could be very difficult for an Attendant to meet all of the requirements OSHA defines for Attendants OSHA Notes regarding Attendants and Multiple Entries NOTE to 1910 146 d 6 Attendants may be assigned to monitor more than one permit space provided the duties described in paragraph i of this section can be effectively performed for each permit space that is monitored Likewise attendants may be stationed at any location outside the permit space to be monitored as long as the duties described in paragraph i of this section can be effectively performed for each permit space that is monitored 1910 146 d 7 If multiple spaces are to be monitored by a single attendant include in the permit program the means and procedures to enable the attendant to respond to an emergency affecting one or more of the permit spaces being monitored without distraction from the attendant s responsibilities under paragraph i of this section Once all these critical factors have been reviewed you will need to consider the following when writing a rescue plan for an identical space Internal configuration Elevation Portal Size For hazards and LOTO procedures you may be able to use the same rescue plan to cover those spaces An example would be in doing ten 10 ground level entries into 6 ft deep manholes each with a 24 round horizontal portal with a valve at the bottom The rescue plan may be identical for all of these entries with the same description and hazards However on the rescue plan you would need to allow for any unexpected hazards such as a possible change in atmosphere This would be needed to be detected and properly handled by the responders at the time of the incident So these are some of the basics you need to consider when writing a rescue preplan for confined spaces and for determining if and when an Attendant can effectively monitor multiple spaces If you have questions concerning these topics please feel free to contact Roco at 800 647 7626 read more Can your Rescue Team Walk the Walk The Value of Performance Evaluations Tuesday January 31 2012 As an employer with permit required confined spaces you ll need to determine if your rescue team or selected rescue service can truly walk the walk when it comes to confined space rescue OSHA s Permit Required Confined Space Standard 1910 146 is performance based meaning it s all about capabilities when the stakes are high Conducting a performance evaluation of your rescue service is a vital component in determining their true capabilities as well as fully meeting the performance requirements of 1910 146 The Dilemma Determining the adequacy of the team s rescue capability can present a dilemma for many employers That is does the employer have the depth of understanding in technical rescue required to administer an accurate meaningful performance evaluation Do they know what to look for in terms of proper equipment use efficiency compliance with industry standards and required safety systems just to name a few If not is it then possible that the team may not be able to affect rescue when the need arises As we know it s quite easy to demonstrate a rescue capability for a very straight forward situation This is what we call a Dog and Pony Show They tend to be very controlled and scripted to ensure that everything goes smoothly Unfortunately when there s an actual emergency it seems the victims never get a copy of the script Unless the rescue team or service is prepared for the other than straight forward rescue the operation has little chance of going smoothly There are still way too many incidents involving injury or death to would be rescuers that can be directly attributed to lack of proficiency in the type of rescue being attempted The Guidance Fortunately Appendix F Non Mandatory of 1910 146 provides guidance for employers in choosing an appropriate rescue service It contains criteria that may be used to evaluate the capabilities both of prospective and current rescue teams For all rescue teams or services the evaluation should consist of two components An initial evaluation in which employers decide whether a potential rescue service or team is adequately trained and equipped to perform permit space rescues of the kind needed at the facility and whether such rescuers can respond in a timely manner A performance evaluation in which employers measure the performance of the team or service during an actual or practice rescue Another way to break down these two evaluation components is something like this 1 The initial evaluation is to determine if the rescue service can talk the talk and 2 the performance evaluation is to determine if the rescue service can walk the walk During the initial evaluation the employer should interview the prospective rescue service or team to determine response times availability a means to summons in the event of an emergency reciprocal communications should the service team become unavailable whether they meet the requirements 1910 146 paragraph k 2 and whether they are willing to perform rescue at the employer s workplace Additionally during the initial evaluation the employer should determine if the rescue service team has the necessary equipment to perform rescues This includes both technical rescue equipment and if a space may pose a significant atmospheric hazard which requires entry rescue does the team service have adequate supplies of SCBA or SAR ROCO NOTE Another aspect often overlooked is HazMat capabilities does the team have the proper training and PPE to protect themselves from the particular hazards they may face Can they deal with de con issues that may result from exposure Or as the employer will you provide the appropriate PPE and decon Finally the employer should evaluate if the rescue team service has the technical knowledge for vertical rescues in excess of five feet the knowledge of rope work or elevated rescue if needed and the necessary skills for medical evaluation and patient packaging Other than the visual and or physical review of the rescue equipment and if necessary emergency breathing air the initial evaluation of the team service is primarily completed through interviews and a review of training documents In other words can the team or service talk the talk Therefore it is simply not enough for an employer to rely on the initial evaluation While it s a good start in

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  • RescueTalk™
    ever changing conditions and problems that are unique to rescue We also feel this pending LOI could affect the safety and ability of rescuers to adjust to these situations However until this issue is clarified Roco will not teach or use the technique of having multiple rescuers entrants attached to the same retrieval line in consecutive order using midline knots as their attachment points read more 1910 147 LOTO vs 1910 146 Isolation Wednesday July 06 2011 Question If I close and Lockout Tagout the main valve on the natural gas line supplying a boiler unit does this satisfy OSHA s requirement for eliminating the hazard of a permit required confined space Answer No it does not You are asking a question that we address quite often and it reveals some misconceptions regarding eliminating or isolating the permit space from hazards Lockout Tagout LOTO procedures are covered in OSHA s 1910 147 Control of Hazardous Energy Lockout Tagout Many times this regulation is incorrectly referenced when addressing permit space hazards that are not covered by this regulation OSHA s 1910 147 LOTO regulation applies to the control of electrical mechanical hydraulic pneumatic chemical thermal or other energy It does not apply to engulfment hazards liquid or flowable solids flammable gasses or other gasses that may be toxic or oxygen displacing It is important to understand this distinction because the use of isolation procedures appropriate for the hazards addressed in 1910 147 may not be effective in eliminating other hazards Isolation as defined in the Permit Required Confined Space regulation 1910 146 spells out the various measures required to eliminate hazardous energies as covered in the LOTO regulation as well as the types of hazards that are not addressed in that regulation You will note that 1910 146 cites LOTO as a means to isolate all sources of energy emphasis added but outlines other methods used to isolate the other hazards such as hazardous materials These isolation procedures include the process by which a permit space is removed from service and completely protected against the release of energy and material into the space by such means as blanking or blinding misaligning or removing sections of lines pipes or ducts a double block and bleed system lockout or tagout of all sources of energy or blocking or disconnecting all mechanical linkages By closing and placing a LOTO device on a single valve of a natural gas feed line you may have controlled the hazard but you have not eliminated it To provide true isolation elimination you will have to employ such means as blanking or blinding misaligning or removing sections of lines pipes or ducts or a double block and bleed system Download the LOTO tip sheet from NIOSH read more How to Haul a Victim in Half the Time Part 2 Tuesday June 28 2011 Well maybe not half the time but certainly some fraction of the time In How to Haul a Victim in Half the Time Part 1 we covered ways to reduce the time needed to haul a rescue package by taking advantage of changes of direction Here we want to address OSHA and ANSI guidance regarding retrieval systems specifically mechanical devices used for rescue OSHA 1910 146 k 3 states To facilitate non entry rescue retrieval systems or methods shall be used whenever an authorized entrant enters a permit space unless the retrieval equipment would increase the overall risk of entry or would not contribute to the rescue of the entrant Additionally OSHA follows the ANSI Z117 1 1989 approach that was in effect at the time of OSHA 1910 146 promulgation which states A mechanical device shall be available to retrieve personnel from vertical type PRCS s greater than 5 feet in depth It also adds In general mechanical lifting devices should have a mechanical advantage adequate to safely rescue personnel Subsequent revisions to ANSI Z117 included the recommendation that The mechanical device used should be appropriate for rescue service The revised standard adds Mechanical lifting devices should have a mechanical advantage of at least four to one and the capacity to lift entrants including any attached tools and equipment Two key points that must be considered 1 OSHA follows the ANSI approach that was in effect at the time 1910 146 was promulgated which did not recommend a minimum mechanical advantage ratio and 2 The rule makers intended to leave a degree of latitude for the rescue service to select a lifting device that is most appropriate for the particular situation encountered Roco s rule of thumb is the mechanical device used should be appropriate for rescue service and the employer should not use any mechanical device that could injure the entrant during rescue which would include a mechanical device with too great a mechanical advantage MA for the number of people operating the system Here s a guideline we use for determining the proper number of rescuers for a particular system it should take some effort to haul the victim but not so much effort that it wears the rescuers completely out And it should not be too easy or you won t as readily feel if the victim gets hung up Because 1910 146 is a performance based regulation it does not specify the rescue procedures that are most appropriate for any given PRCS It leaves this to the responding rescue service based on their assessment of the PRCS in terms of configuration depth and anticipated rescue load Current ANSI Z117 recommends that the MA should be at least four to one Notice that it does not state shall and thus the discretion of the rescue service is taken into account A generic recommendation of a 4 1 is a good start but should not be considered as a catch all answer to the problem of lifting the load Even a 4 1 may not be enough if the person doing the hauling is not strong enough and may require a greater M A in order to remove the load from the space Must we always use a minimum MA of 4 1 or could there be justification in using an MA below the 4 1 ratio when there is a need to provide a faster means of hauling the rescue package Consider the possibility of reducing the mechanical advantage ratio when there is plenty of haul team members If you have 4 haul team members for a 250 pound rescue package do you really need that 4 1 MA Consider going with a 3 1 or even a 2 1 especially if the throw is short and the haul is long However keep in mind that the package will be traveling much faster by reducing the MA so it is imperative that a hole watch be assigned to monitor the rescue package and be ready to call an immediate STOP should the package become hung up Caution If you re using a piggyback system make sure the haul team does not outpace the individual taking in the mainline slack through a ratchet device Should a lot of slack build up in the mainline and the haul team lose control of the haul line the resulting free fall of the load could spell disaster Of course we always encourage the use of a safety belay line but on rare occasions the urgency of the rescue may warrant not using a safety line on the victim Ultimately it is the employer s responsibility to evaluate the selected rescue service s ability to provide prompt and effective rescue If the rescue service is able to demonstrate their capability using an MA that is less than the current ANSI recommendation then that would meet the performance based nature of the standard In reality by using a reduced MA the time required to extricate the rescue package can be cut by 1 3 to 1 2 depending on the situation In certain emergencies that saved time could very easily mean the difference between a successful rescue and a body recovery read more How to Haul a Victim in Half the Time Part 1 Thursday May 12 2011 As anyone who has ever been summoned to an industrial site for a confined space rescue or has taken the opportunity to practice rescue drills in these facilities knows sometimes the working area for the rescue team can be a tad cozy By cozy we mean cramped If there is the need for a haul of the rescuers or victim after a lower these cramped conditions can cause multiple problems Consider it a challenge to overcome and use your rope rescue know how to come up with an efficient solution that will not only reduce congestion at the working area but will most likely provide for a much faster haul of the rescue package First of all if the space lends itself to a vertically mounted block and tackle the problem is greatly reduced However if there is no overhead anchor available and the use of a portable overhead anchor such as a tripod is not feasible then a lane for the haul team may be necessary At times even the use of a vertically mounted block and tackle may require a solution to a congested working area Sometimes we are confronted with a very short throw between the mechanical advantage anchor point and the edge of the portal This may cause multiple resets of the haul system be it a piggyback system or a Z Rig These short throws with multiple resets will really slow down the progress of hauling the rescue package and can become a significant hazard when the need for rapid retrieval is needed If the opportunity presents itself take advantage of a simple change of direction on the haul system At times a single 90 degree change of direction can convert a short 3 4 foot throw into a throw many times longer We see this all the time on catwalks yet it is often overlooked by our rescue teams when we throw scenario based training evolutions at them Yes it does require some extra equipment which typically amounts to a single sheave pulley a carabiner and a utility strap It also adds some frictional losses at that directional pulley but the advantage gained by extending the throw from 3 4 feet to 20 or more feet far outweighs the disadvantages of extra equipment added friction and time needed to make the change If a single change of direction doesn t quite solve the short throw problem consider two or even more changes of direction in order to position the haul team in an area thatthey can walk the haul using their leg strength instead of being bunched up and using their arm strength only Of course it gets to a point where too many changes of direction exhausts the equipment cache or creates so much friction that any advantage is lost As in any rescue situation a good cohesive team is a great benefit If the situation causes the team to be bunched up on top of each other remember to scan the area for an opportunity to open things up a bit Sometimes that change of direction does wonders for the ability of the team to take full advantage of their strength in numbers and creates a situation where if needed speed can be a lifesaver About the Author Patrick Furr employed with Roco since 2000 has been actively involved with technical rescue since 1981 Pat is a Chief Instructor Technical Consultant for Roco and currently resides in Albuquerque New Mexico He has also been an On Site Safety Services Team Leader for Roco at a major semiconductor company in New Mexico for the past ten years As a Chief Instructor Pat teaches Confined Space Rescue Rope Access Tower Work Rescue and Fall Protection programs across North America Prior to Roco he served 20 years in the U S Air Force as a Pararescueman PJ His background includes eight years as a member of the 71st Pararescue team in Anchorage Alaska where he specialized in mountain and glacier rescue Pat was a team leader of the 1986 and 1988 PJ teams that summited Mt McKinley and augmented the National Park Service mountain rescue team He also spent two tours of duty in Iceland where he put in multiple first ascent ice routes read more Two Compliance Options for Rescue Teams Tuesday May 03 2011 Oftentimes Safety Supervisors or Emergency Response Coordinators will ask Does OSHA require Rescue Technician certification for industrial rescuers While there are many benefits to certification to a national consensus standard such as NFPA OSHA s Confined Space regulation is performance based and focuses on a timely and capable rescue response It basically revolves around the bottom line of Is your rescue service trained and equipped to respond in a safe and effective manner to the applicable kinds types of confined spaces and have they met the minimum annual practice requirements But then again how do you prove proficiency That s where certification to a national consensus standard by a qualified third party can make a big difference in validating rescue effectiveness and thus documenting compliance Following the guidelines of NFPA National Fire Protection Association Standards is and has been a big focus for municipal agencies for decades and these standards specifically NFPA 1006 provide an excellent tool for documenting required individual rescuer skills We also know that compliance is a critical focus for industrial customers who must walk the tightrope of complying with numerous federal regulations In preparing our course curriculum for 2011 we wanted to offer two options or compliance paths based on the specific needs of our customers one with certification testing and one without Both paths however will build a solid foundation for emergency responders who are charged with handling confined space and elevated rope rescue incidents Based on the skills and guidelines set forth by NFPA 1006 and 1670 each Roco certification level requires the successful completion of a skills proficiency evaluation as well as a written exam As you will see from the Roco Training Path Chart we have made our certification levels progressive for 2011 and now offer a more advanced Tech III certification Rescue Tech II provides certification to the Confined Space Rescue level which includes the core rope rescue skills required to perform rescues from ground level and elevated entries Rescue Tech III includes Rope Rescue certification and progresses to a more advanced level including rope ascension and high lines or traverse Now that these programs are designed to build upon the previous level the completion of Tech II is highly recommended prior to attending Tech III As before we also offer these certification levels in a quicker format in our FAST TRACK 80 and FAST TRACK 120 courses download a Training Path Chart for details Also new for 2011 Roco s Industrial Rescue I II course will teach safe and effective techniques for industrial and confined space rope rescue with a specific emphasis on compliance with OSHA s Permit Required Confined Space 1910 146 regulation Rescuers will be taught solid foundational rope rescue skills with focused practice in all six representative confined space types in order to meet minimum annual training requirements of 1910 146 Practical skills used in real world scenarios including on air scenarios in simulated IDLH atmospheres will prepare responders for the many challenges of industrial and confined space rescue operations This program does not include skills and written testing but will concentrate on providing the skills and practical experience for confined space and elevated scenarios most common to industrial environments For teams wanting to put your skills to the test Roco s Rescue Challenge will push the envelope by simulating real world industrial incidents under limited time restraints to give participants the most intense rescue experience possible From realistic scenarios in all six confined space types to Roco s infamous multi level Yellow Brick Road teams will be challenged to the max while learning new and more effective ways to handle confined space emergency situations Each scenario will be debriefed in order to give valuable feedback to the teams and offer suggestions for an even more effective rescue response If your team is ready to take it to the next level Roco s Rescue IV Advanced Rescue Scenarios will offer more complex confined space and elevated scenarios to better prepare you for a wide array of rescue emergencies Extensive use of confined space scenarios including on air simulated IDLH response will challenge even the most experienced rescue teams This program will also document annual practice requirements as required by OSHA 1910 146 read more Rescue Plans What is required Tuesday April 12 2011 We had a very interesting inquiry regarding OSHA s requirements for rescue plans and wanted to share it with you Reader s Question Does OSHA 1910 146 k 1 v state that a plan must be developed by a rescue service before an entry can be made Can entries be conducted with the understanding that a rescue service has the competence to rescue someone without seeing the space prior Section k 1 v of the regulation states that the employer shall Provide the rescue team or service selected with access to all permit spaces from which rescue may be necessary so that the rescue service can develop appropriate rescue plans and practice rescue operations Emphasis added First of all it s important to note that the term plan as used in safety related regulations and standards such as the Permit Required Confined Space PRCS standard can have a more general meaning than what rescuers typically think of when they refer to rescue preplans When rescuers refer to rescue preplans what usually comes to mind is a very specific detailed plan for rescue from a particular space Although the regulations do not specifically state that a plan must be developed by a rescue service

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  • RescueTalk™
    air for rescuers can be determined from your hazard assessment or in some cases by company policy and even required by OSHA when there s an unknown atmosphere involved Remember it s much better to be safe than sorry read more Municipal Response to Permit Required Confined Spaces Tuesday November 16 2010 A blog reader who is a member of a municipal rescue team assigned to an airport expressed concern about fulfilling timely response obligations for permit required confined space entries within his district Here are some suggestions from our Tech Panel First of all the departments and agencies involved must carefully consider the obligations in providing rescue response for permit required confined spaces Obviously we cannot advise on departmental policy concerning response and notification this must be determined by management officials However for you as an emergency responder we cannot stress enough the importance of preplanning and conducting a hazard analysis for all confined spaces within your response area The information gained by the analysis will help you determine what level of timely response may be required for a particular type of entry OSHA does not set a specific response time because there are too many variables involved plus they don t want to set requirements that might cause a rescue team to rush into entering a space to attempt a rescue OSHA does reference how long a person might survive an IDLH atmosphere such as an oxygen deficient atmosphere before becoming incapacitated 4 to 6 minutes However even this is up to interpretation depending on the level of oxygen present For example an 18 O2 level vs a 6 O2 level both are O2 deficient but have very different response requirements for successful rescue Another important consideration is when an entrant is entering an IDLH environment In this case having a team standing by the portal fully equipped and ready to go may be the only way to meet a timely response for that situation OSHA s 1910 134 Respiratory Protection requires that employers provide a standby person or persons capable of immediate action to rescue employee s wearing respiratory protection while in work areas defined as IDLH atmospheres Most entries however are not IDLH This means that other forms of external rescue vs internal rescue may be appropriate Many times in the rush of the moment rescuers forget about external retrieval Guessing that many of the spaces around the airport are manholes or vaults these can most often be handled by the confined space attendant with an external retrieval system This would include a mechanical winch attached to a tripod with a cable attached to the entrant s high point dorsal connection Of course this decision would be based on a prior hazard analysis NOTE It s important to note that ALL entrants are required to have an immediate means of retrieval Reference OSHA 1910 146 note to paragraph k 1 i concerning timely response What will be considered timely will vary according to the specific hazards involved in each entry As a final note if hazard analysis and rescue preplans have not been conducted on your potential sites as required by OSHA we encourage you to do so Taking the time to do so will better enable you to determine what would be considered an appropriate timely response for a particular type of entry It will also better prepare you as an emergency responder should the need arise read more Is a tailboard briefing enough prior to a confined space entry Monday November 08 2010 We had this question from a reader and wanted to post for all to read Would a proper tailboard briefing conducted before a confined space entry be sufficient for identifying hazards that may be encountered by the entrants or the rescue team It s true that a tailboard briefing should be an integral part of the larger overall preplanning for a confined space entry However well in advance of the entry a detailed hazard analysis of the space should be performed A hazard analysis is used to identify the types of hazards lock out tag out needs PPE required for entry method of entry and important rescue considerations In fact OSHA requires these written assessments to be completed prior to an entry being made and the confined space permit acts as a secondary written assessment performed at the time of the entry Here are some OSHA references concerning this topic 1910 146 c 5 ii H The employer shall verify that the space is safe for entry and that the pre entry measures required by paragraph c 5 ii of this section have been taken through a written certification that contains the date the location of the space and the signature of the person providing the certification The certification shall be made before entry and shall be made available to each employee entering the space or to that employee s authorized representative 1910 146 d 2 Identify and evaluate the hazards of permit spaces before employees enter them 1910 146 d 3 Develop and implement the means procedures and practices necessary for safe permit space entry operations The tailboard briefing should be used to confirm or reinforce the information already gathered in the hazard analysis Because it deals with an individual space at the time of entry the tailboard briefing is also a very useful tool in finding out if conditions have changed since the hazard analysis was completed So the bottom line having a detailed hazard analysis for each space that includes a detailed rescue preplan allows a rescue team to review and prepare for potential problems well in advance Reviewing this information at a tailboard briefing just prior to the entry helps to remind everyone of the possible hazards the proper precautions and the potential solutions should an emergency occur read more Retrieval vs Entry Rescue Monday October 25 2010 There s no doubt about it confined space entry is risky business A first consideration should always be to try and eliminate the known and potential hazards or even better engineer out the need for entry when possible If it s not possible or feasible and entry must be made then as part of OSHA s Permit Required Confined Space standard 1910 146 the employer must take action to protect its workers This regulation requires employers to develop and implement procedures for summoning rescue and emergency services for rescuing entrants from permit spaces and for preventing unauthorized personnel from attempting a rescue Planning for rescue of the entrant should always be approached in a logical hierarchy The first choice for rescue should always be self rescue However there are too many lads named Murphy lurking about to be able to rely on this as the only means of rescue That leads to the next option which is retrieval rescue This means that retrieval or rescue of the entrant s can be made without anyone else having to enter the space NOTE It s important to note that the hierarchy of rescue needs to be followed even when an entry rescue team is located on site For example when an entry is made into a simple vertical vault a retrieval system must be used even if a trained rescue team is standing by again preventing rescuers from having to enter the space unless necessary To facilitate non entry rescue retrieval systems or methods shall be used whenever an authorized entrant enters a permit space unless the retrieval equipment would increase the overall risk of entry or would not contribute to the rescue of the entrant The retrieval system shall include a chest or full body harness with a retrieval line attached at the center of the entrant s back near shoulder level above the entrant s head or in such a way to present a small enough profile for successful removal of the entrant In certain instances wristlets may be used The retrieval line shall be attached to a fixed point outside the space or to a mechanical device For vertical entries more than 5 feet in depth a mechanical device such as a retrieval winch or mechanical advantage rope system shall be available Relying on non entry retrieval rescue requires a thorough and honest assessment of the retrieval system s ability to function as intended should the need arise Are there any entanglement issues within the space that would cause the retrieval line to fail If the entrant must travel around any 90 degree corners or between levels will the retrieval line work Any and all potential causes of retrieval system failure would require the need to plan for entry rescue One of the advantages of non entry retrieval rescue is that oftentimes it can be performed by the attendant Modern retrieval equipment may utilize powerful gear reductions or rope mechanical advantages and are usually quite easy for the attendant to learn to operate It is encouraged and quite common for the attendant to be trained and capable of performing non entry rescue The attendant is prohibited however from entering the space to perform rescue unless properly trained and equipped for entry rescue which is the last option in the hierarchy of rescue NOTE Even if the attendant is trained and equipped for entry rescue he or she must be relieved by another authorized attendant before abandoning their attendant duties Entry rescue requires the rescuer s to enter the confined space thus possibly exposing them to the same hazards as the victim That s why it is critical for rescuers to be trained and equipped with the proper PPE to protect themselves from the hazards involved In fact OSHA states that if you don t have the proper PPE or training DO NOT ATTEMPT THE RESCUE This warning is driven by the great number of would be rescuers dying in confined spaces while attempting to save a life Safe successful entry rescue requires sufficient training in the proper techniques a proficiency in the use of the appropriate PPE and rescue equipment and the ability to recognize and identify the hazards and potential hazards in confined spaces Again it s important to keep in mind that there are many permit required confined spaces where non entry retrieval is a viable option and it should be used whenever possible Vertical utility vaults with no entanglement hazards horizontal entries with no corners or elevation changes are just a few The proper course is to always perform a thorough assessment of the space to determine which type of rescue will be needed and to make sure the appropriate rescue response is in place should the entrants need assistance read more To Pre rig or not to Pre rig Monday September 27 2010 We received an interesting question about pre rigged systems from one of our subscribers The TechPanel had some helpful comments to share so we have re posted the info here It s a great topic Here are some things to consider about leaving systems pre rigged First of all whether to pre rig systems or not depends a lot on the types of rescues you will be doing Pre rigged systems make sense for most industrial and municipal teams who have rope equipment designated specifically for rescues However it makes less sense for climbers and wilderness personnel who will be using the same equipment for multiple uses and putting systems together based on a specific need This also reduces the amount and weight of equipment they must carry which is a big concern However it also requires a high level of proficiency in a variety of systems in order to build systems safely and in a timely manner Next let s clarify what we mean by pre rigged systems Plug n Play These are systems that come pre built and seem to require little training to operate These Plug n Play systems may work for a specific location or type of rescue but may not work in every situation Training for these systems should address what to do if the device system malfunctions or if it will not work for the type of scenario you may be faced with Customized Pre rigged Systems These are customized pre rigged systems that rescuers build for site specific needs and their team s needs using existing equipment and training Confined space and rope rescue can be broken down to three core tasks 1 Lowering 2 Safety line Belay and 3 Mechanical Advantage Retrieval systems You can build pre rigged systems that make sense for your specific needs Many of the teams we work with have adopted a three bag system For example one rope bag is designated for Lowering along with the typical equipment needed for a lowering system i e descent control device carabiners anchor straps padding This will provide a pre rigged system that will handle most of your lowering needs You may decide to supplement that with another anchor strap and a pulley for a high point directional etc Your Safety line Belay bag can be set up the same way with enough carabiners and shock absorbers attached to the rope bag to allow for at least two rescuers and a victim The third bag of rope Mechanical Advantage Retrieval with a simple pre built Block n Tackle hauling system and its own anchor straps will give your team an immediate means of retrieval for either the main line or a safety line retrieval With a few additional pieces of hardware you will be able handle the vast majority of urban rope confined space rescue scenarios We find that for industrial rescue teams or municipal fire and police rescue squads these pre rigged systems make sense They save set up time and get a rescuer to the victim as quickly as possible which is especially critical for an IDLH emergency Many times teams will arrange their equipment so that it s easier to inventory rather than what s the fastest way to deploy it For example if you have twenty carabiners why not have them attached to a rapid deployment bag type system rather than in a hardware bag that a team member will have to go through and pick out what is needed Our best advice would be to look at your team s response area and consider the types of rescues that may be needed You can then customize and build pre rigged systems that make sense for your team Plug n Play systems may handle most of your rescue situations or they may be part of a larger pre rigged rescue system like the one above Using a pre rigged systems approach saves time cuts down on confusion and uses equipment more efficiently especially when the pressure is on read more Firefighter and Worker Die in Confined Space Incident Thursday September 09 2010 TARRYTOWN NY WABC A fire department official says oxygen levels were dangerously low in a manhole where a sewer worker and a firefighter died No cause of death has been established in Monday s deaths of sewer worker Anthony Ruggiero and Tarrytown firefighter John Kelly At firehouses throughout Tarrytown there are the ceremonial displays that no department ever wants to have to put up black and purple bunting and flags at half staff Inside the headquarters there s a memorial for one of the fallen men John Kelly Our prayers all go out to the families of these two men who were doing their jobs Tarrytown Mayor Drew Fixell said One of them a firefighter acting heroic and trying to save the other one Ruggerio was trying to clear a backup of sewage as part of his full time job in the village s Public Works Department He was overcome by fumes and collapsed Kelly had tried to save Ruggiero but also the fumes overwhelmed him as well Assistant Fire Chief John McGee said Tuesday that a hazardous materials team measured the oxygen level at 14 percent The normal amount of oxygen in air is about 21 percent He said he did not know if other deadly gases were detected Those are life threatening conditions that may have taken the men by surprise Village Administrator Michael Blau said neither of the men who died had put on a protective masks before entering the manhole He said autopsies were planned The deaths were being investigated by federal state and local agencies It s very very sad resident Susie Poore said I m speechless because I don t know even what to say I don t know what to say other than I must have said Oh my God 100 times already Both victims spent over 20 years as volunteer firefighters Ruggerio was a supervisor in the DPW by trade Kelly worked as a state Department of Transportation worker read more Delayed Rescue Response Cited in Fatal Tunnel Fire Thursday September 02 2010 Here s another deadly reminder of the importance of a capable and timely response to confined space emergencies Five people were killed in this fatal tunnel fire According to OSHA the case involving Xcel Energy and RPI Coating is not being tried until next year After reading the official Chemical Safety Board report here are some key findings 1 Did not have adequate technical rescue services standing by at the Permit Required Confined Space 911 was listed on paperwork Took the rescue team 1 hr and 15 mins to arrive at the site 2 Confined space was assessed as Non PRCS even though the inability to self rescue and the introduction of MEK 3 RPI did not have an adequate confined space program 4 No hazard analysis was conducted 5 Not recognizing that 10 LEL or higher is an IDLH condition 6 Workers were located over 1400 ft away from where atmospheric monitoring was being performed Article below written by P Solomon Banda Associated Press Writer DENVER The U S Chemical Safety Board slammed Xcel Energy Inc on Monday for the company s handling

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  • RescueTalk™
    regards to opening size configuration and accessibility Representative spaces shall simulate the types of permit spaces from which rescue is to be performed Non Mandatory Appendix F Rescue Team Rescue Service Evaluation Criteria These are some but not all of the requirements of an initial and periodic performance evaluation of the rescue team At a minimum if an offsite rescue team is being considered the employer must contact the service to plan and coordinate the evaluation of the team based on 1910 146 k Merely posting the service s phone number or planning to rely on 911 to obtain these services at the time of a permit space emergency would not comply with paragraph k 1 of the standard Can the rescue team respond in an appropriate amount of time based on the hazards of the space For known IDLH hazards or hazards that can quickly develop into IDLH conditions on scene rescue standby is required For non IDLH hazards a response time of 10 15 minutes may be adequate Will the offsite rescue team be available to respond to a confined space incident or is there a potential they will be out of service on a separate incident and unable to respond If necessary can the rescue service properly package and retrieve victims from a permit space that has a limited size opening less than 24 inches in diameter or from a space that has internal obstacles or hazards Does the service have the capability to provide rescue from an elevated location using high angle rescue techniques About the Author Patrick Furr employed with Roco since 2000 has been actively involved with technical rescue since 1981 He is a Roco Chief Instructor as well as a Team Leader for our on site safety services in New Mexico Pat teaches Confined Space Rescue Rope Access Tower Work Rescue and Fall Protection programs across North America He is a retired U S Air Force MSgt Pararescueman read more What are three levels of protection required by OSHA for confined space entrants Thursday June 24 2010 The three levels of protection required by OSHA for confined space entrants are 1 Hazard Awareness 2 Retrieval Equipment 3 Rescue Services read more Does the confined space entrant need to use a harness and lifeline or retrieval system even when a trained rescue team is on site Wednesday June 09 2010 Yes A retrieval system should be used whenever an entrant enters a permit space unless the retrieval system creates a greater hazard to the entrant or does not contribute to the rescue effort read more Middletown OH Confined Space Incident FF s Down Wednesday June 09 2010 Friday May 7 2010 A 32 year old city worker is dead after being overcome by fumes this morning while checking a sewer outside of a business on Yankee Road according to police Meanwhile two firefighters who attempted to rescue the public works employee were hospitalized after the accident about 8 a m today May 7 in front of Air Products and Chemicals Inc 2500 Yankee Road according to police Jabin Lakes died after falling into a manhole during an inspection according to Police Maj Mark Hoffman More Firefighters went into rescue Lakes and were overcome with something in the shaft he said It is not clear what the substance is according to Hoffman Fire Marshal Bob Hess was taken to Atrium Medical Center in Middletown and Capt Todd Wissemier was taken to Miami Valley Hospital in Dayton according to Hoffman The manhole is estimated to be about 20 to 30 feet deep and 20 to 22 inches wide Hoffman said Mayor Larry Mulligan could not discuss details of the incident but said the city will hold a press conference today at 2 p m in council chambers One Donham Plaza A coroner s investigator is at the scene as well as fire rescue units from West Chester Twp Fairfield and Franklin The deceased man is still in the hole at 9 55 a m Shortly before 10 a m crews were performing air quality tests on the manhole Hoffman said He said there does not appear to be any hazard to the general public in the area At 10 12 a m crews on scene were requesting a chemist from AK Steel be sent to the manhole Air Products officials were in a meeting regarding the incident and couldn t be reached for comment The Allentown Pa based company provides oxygen to AK Steel s Middletown Works Hoffman said Lakes and two other city workers were inspecting the sewer about 8 a m because Air Products was interested in tapping into a main line When the manhole cover was opened Lakes was overcome by fumes and fell into the hole he said The workers called 911 and fire crews arrived shortly thereafter Hoffman said read more South Dakota Wheat Growers Assoc Fined 1 6M After Fatality Wednesday June 09 2010 The U S Department of Labor s Occupational Safety and Health Administration has fined the South Dakota Wheat Growers Association of Aberdeen S D more than 1 6 million following the Dec 22 2009 death of a worker at the company s McLaughlin S D grain handling operation The worker suffocated after being engulfed by grain in one of the facility s bins OSHA s investigation found that five additional workers were also at risk of being engulfed when they were sent into the bin to dig the victim out OSHA proposed 1 610 000 in fines for 23 alleged willful violations of the grain handling and confined space standards including Failing to prohibit workers from walking on top of clumped grain Failing to prohibit entry into the grain bins where the buildup of grain existed Failing to shut off and lock out equipment to prevent grain from moving through the bin while workers were inside Failing to equip workers with grain engulfment protection Failing to provide observers equipped to provide assistance Failing to train workers

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  • Tech Talk: Stokes Basket Lashing for Rope Rescue
    Confined Spaces Gravedigger Engulfed In Cave in of Unguarded Grave Hot Topics ATMOSPHERIC HAZARDS 6 CONFINED SPACE 58 EQUIPMENT 36 FALL PROTECTION 16 FIRE FIGHTERS 1 HOW TO VIDEOS 6 INCIDENTS 27 MISCELLANEOUS 40 NEWS 90 OSHA MEMORANDUM 2 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 36 QUICK DRILLS 12 REGULATIONS 31 SAFETY 55 STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE 5 TECHNIQUES 23 TRAINING 6 TRENCH 10 RescueTalk RocoRescue com has been created as a free resource for

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  •