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  • Quick-Connect Harness Buckle Safety
    the drain plugs the next time the boat is launched the transom well will fill with water which could lead to swamping So is this a design flaw or improper use From an equipment designer manufacturer s point of view the use of this terminology could be very significant With the many advances in life safety equipment we have seen harnesses and other rescue safety equipment become more convenient lighter multifunctional and overall safer than earlier generations As with many product advances and improvements there may be compromise in one area but advances in many others In this case the speed and ease of donning and doffing a Class III rescue or fall protection harness by using some type of quick connect buckle Of course the user must ensure that the buckle is used correctly The pass through buckle has been around a very long time In fact a Croll sport climbing sit harness that I bought in 1981 had this type buckle These buckles were also used in the past on the leg loops on Roco harnesses There are minor variations on the design of the buckle with some having slots to ease the pass through of the top plate while others do not have this slot There are important requirements for the safe use of these buckles which include 1 Make sure the buckle is adjusted tightly enough to ensure constant tension is applied to the top plate against the fixed plate 2 Be sure that the top plate is not inverted 3 Double check that the tail end of the webbing does not pass through the fixed plate but instead lays parallel with the anchored section of the webbing These three user points of performance are easily completed Our extensive experience with this type of buckle tells

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/quick-connect-harness-buckle-safety (2016-02-15)
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  • Roco Announces Our New Class III Harness
    straps requiring the wearer to start all over again The CMC Roco Work Rescue Harness features comfortable wear especially while suspended The lightweight proprietary CMC alloy D Rings reduce the overall weight of the harness while the addition of a rated attachment point at the back of the waist belt allows for a convenient connection to a fall restraint lanyard The harness has many advantages for work at height professionals For rope access technicians the top of the A Frame lift is designed to accept a variety of connectors for anchoring chest ascenders It also includes a closed loop on the chest H Frame to mount a chest ascender adjustable tow strap Tower climbers will benefit from the vertical orientation of the sternal D Ring which eliminates binding of ladder safety system cable grabs during down climbs The sternal D Ring has a quick release stowage strap that keeps the ring tucked neatly against the chest when not in use The harness features ergonomic curves and pre formed moldings for user comfort and durability while maintaining a modern look It also incorporates breathable padding on the interior surfaces to reduce heat retention The dorsal and shoulder pads are a one piece design created by a vacuum molding process making it comfortable without sacrificing form for ease of donning The Fall Arrest Indicator is another great safety feature available on this harness The visual on the tag alerts the user if the harness has had a previous fall Creating a harness that is easier and quicker to don provides a great advantage for rope professionals The new CMC Roco Work Rescue Harness literally wraps around the user s body once donned and adjusted it s then custom fit to your body according to Chief Instructor Pat Furr who led Roco s

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/roco-announces-our-new-class-iii-harness (2016-02-15)
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  • Roco Tech Panel Q&A
    are suspected or additional protection for placing a patient over an edge is wanted then a short spinal immobilizer such as the OSS can be used If a spinal injury is not suspected then no additional equipment needs to be used with the Sked It is always good to keep in mind however that the thin plastic make up of the Sked will allow the patient to feel every edge or bump you place or drag them over 2 Location What size portal do you need to get the patient and packaging through in order to perform the rescue Many times in portals less than 18 inches the individual pieces of equipment will fit into the space but once put together they will not fit back out of the space The Sked was designed for this specific circumstance The thin plastic construction allows it to fit in places many other litters will not The Sked can also be used vertically with the bottom not curled and secured in cases where a hare traction splint or other injury doesn t allow securement at the bottom The Sked is a very user friendly device that can be used in a multitude of configurations and for various applications This is one of the reasons why it is such a popular rescue tool especially for confined space rescue Stay safe NOTICE The information provided on our website and by our Tech Panel is a complimentary service for our readers Responses are based on our understanding of the reader s inquiry the equipment and or the technique in question All rescue systems should be evaluated by a competent person before use in the support of any human loads Proper training is required prior to use of rescue techniques or systems discussed Because standards and regulations

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/roco-tech-panel-q-a (2016-02-15)
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  • Potential Safety Issues Regarding Petzl CROLL
    replicate the condition documented with these devices in question Petzl has redesigned the CROLL to have a stainless steel cam as well as stainless steel reinforcement in the rope channel which attaches to the riveted portion of the device to ensure that there will be no replication of the events that occurred to the three older generation devices Petzl also has no warranted reason to issue a recall of this device at present or in the near future Previous Post Roco Rescue has recently learned there are potential safety issues regarding the Petzl Croll B16 B16AAA According to Petzl two different customers have informed them of the failure of the rivet head on two Petzl Croll rope clamps Although neither of these failures have led to an accident the Petzl technical team is urgently reviewing this issue with in depth investigations to understand what exactly caused these failures Petzl wants to remind consumers that when connected to a rope device the user must have a back up device or a connection to a second rope clamp as a secondary means of support They also encourage that users thoroughly inspect their CROLL B16 B16AAA to ensure that the rivet head is not missing The results of this investigation will be released no later than April 18th NOTE This notice does not affect similar products such as the CROLL B16BAA ASCENSION or PANTIN With the facts known today it currently only affects the old CROLL B16 and B16AAA that were produced in 2012 Stay connected to Roco Rescue for your latest news on this issue http www petzl com us pro safety information croll B16AAA us Previous Next New Stuff Atmospheric Monitors May NOT Detect All Dangers Roco QUICK DRILL 10 Tripod Quick Drill Service Life Guidelines for Rescue Equipment NFPA Issues

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/potential-safety-issues-regarding-petzl-croll (2016-02-15)
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  • Steve Hudson Tribute
    the rescue field Steve dedicated his life to creating better and safer products for rescuers He also worked tirelessly to develop national standards to maintain this quality and excellence His company and his family can be very proud A special thanks to Steve and his co founders at PMI Rope for giving Roco Rescue the opportunity to represent his innovative and lifesaving products for more than 30 years For this and his many other contributions we are grateful Previous Next New Stuff Atmospheric Monitors May NOT Detect All Dangers Roco QUICK DRILL 10 Tripod Quick Drill Service Life Guidelines for Rescue Equipment NFPA Issues New Guide for Confined Spaces Gravedigger Engulfed In Cave in of Unguarded Grave Hot Topics ATMOSPHERIC HAZARDS 6 CONFINED SPACE 58 EQUIPMENT 36 FALL PROTECTION 16 FIRE FIGHTERS 1 HOW TO VIDEOS 6 INCIDENTS 27 MISCELLANEOUS 40 NEWS 90 OSHA MEMORANDUM 2 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 36 QUICK DRILLS 12 REGULATIONS 31 SAFETY 55 STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE 5 TECHNIQUES 23 TRAINING 6 TRENCH 10 RescueTalk RocoRescue com has been created as a free resource for sharing insightful information news views and commentary for our students and others who are interested in technical rope rescue Therefore we make no

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/steve-hudson-tribute (2016-02-15)
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  • Alternate Lashing for SKED Stretcher
    stretcher in confined spaces Roco SKED Method Vertical Lift with Backboard Roco Rescue Director of Training Dennis O Connell explains the Roco approved method of rigging a SKED stretcher for vertical lift while using a backboard Roco SKED Method Traditional Method Patient Packaging Technique from the Roco Rescue Channel features the manufacturer s approved method for traditional vertical lift using the SKED stretcher Previous Next New Stuff Atmospheric Monitors May NOT Detect All Dangers Roco QUICK DRILL 10 Tripod Quick Drill Service Life Guidelines for Rescue Equipment NFPA Issues New Guide for Confined Spaces Gravedigger Engulfed In Cave in of Unguarded Grave Hot Topics ATMOSPHERIC HAZARDS 6 CONFINED SPACE 58 EQUIPMENT 36 FALL PROTECTION 16 FIRE FIGHTERS 1 HOW TO VIDEOS 6 INCIDENTS 27 MISCELLANEOUS 40 NEWS 90 OSHA MEMORANDUM 2 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 36 QUICK DRILLS 12 REGULATIONS 31 SAFETY 55 STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE 5 TECHNIQUES 23 TRAINING 6 TRENCH 10 RescueTalk RocoRescue com has been created as a free resource for sharing insightful information news views and commentary for our students and others who are interested in technical rope rescue Therefore we make no representations as to accuracy completeness or suitability of any information and are not liable for

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/alternate-lashing-for-sked-stretcher (2016-02-15)
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  • RescueTalk™
    G General Use 600lbf working load Rescuers must also refer to the manufacturer s recommendations for use However an NFPA 1983 G rating provides a quick field reference to the working load and confirms that a piece of equipment has been tested accordingly This is important because OSHA will most likely look at this if there is an incident To answer your question the manufacturer Petzl allows the ID to be used for the lowering and raising of two person loads If you have any other questions or need more information please let us know we ll be glad to help We also hope to have other videos available soon read more New Items for Your Rescue Toolbox SKED Cobra Buckle Update Tuesday July 31 2012 Reviewed by Pat Furr Roco Chief Instructor Technical Consultant Cobra quick connect buckles are offered as a special order on new Sked and as a retrofit kit for Sked you already have For users of the SKEDCO flexible litter there is good news The SKED Litter can now be ordered with Cobra quick connect buckles Or you can order a Cobra Buckle Retrofit Kit for your original SKED The uses of the new quick connect buckle system cuts the victim packaging time in about half The buckles are each rated at 3 000 pounds and require a dual action to release which provides a high level safety The price of the SKED is a bit higher with the Cobra buckles however you do get everything you pay for with these buckles They dramatically speed up the patient packaging because of the ease of using them And as rescuers we re always looking for ways to evacuate our patients in a quicker and more efficient way read more New Items for Your Rescue Toolbox Petzl ID Thursday July 19 2012 By Pat Furr Roco Chief Instructor Technical Consultant OK who has not had the opportunity to use the Petzl ID The ID is one of the most versatile bits of rescue hardware that I have in my kit It comes in both NFPA G and L rated versions and provides the closest thing to a Jack of all Trades capability that I can think of It was originally designed as an evolutionary improvement to the Petzl Stop and Gri Gri and as its name suggests it was intended to be an Industrial Descender thus ID In very short order it became apparent that this device could do so much more than provide an auto stop capability during rappels The auto stop feature also acts as an instant progress capture or ratchet while pulling rope through the device in the direction opposite that it was designed to control friction This feature provides the option of using the ID as the first change of direction and ratchet in mechanical advantage systems Granted the bobbin of the ID is not nearly as efficient as a true pulley but the efficiency gained by having virtually every fraction of an inch of progress captured and the ease of changing over from a haul to a lower far outweighs any efficiency loss at the bobbin My go to system for situations where I need to change over from lowers to hauls or from hauls to lowers is the ID with the addition of a cam a biner and a pulley Omni Block which gives me an easily assembled 3 1 Z Rig If I need more MA ratio I just use a double sheave pulley at the load end and an additional single sheave pulley at the anchor end now I ve got a 5 1 MA In addition to the use of the ID as the foundation of MA systems it can also be used for short ascents and the manufacturer is now allowing it to be used as a belay device The ID L still retains the quick load side plate that allows it to remain anchored while loading or unloading the rope from the device If you have an extra 5 minutes watch this video where Roco Director of Training Dennis O Connell shares some tips about using the Petzl ID as a part of your confined space rope rescue equipment kit Note The 2012 edition of NFPA 1983 has changed its Light Use L designation to Technical Use T read more New Items for Your Rescue Toolbox SureClip Rescue Pole System Wednesday July 11 2012 By Pat Furr Roco Chief Instructor Technical Consultant When doing our risk vs benefit analysis we always want to limit the exposure of our rescuers to the lowest level of risk practical The SureClip telescopic rescue pole is one tool that can do just that This system provides a means to make a remote attachment to a suspended or otherwise isolated victim such as confined spaces while minimizing risk to the rescuer This system is especially effective in attaching rescue systems to fallen workers that are suspended from their personal fall arrest systems By eliminating the need to put a rescuer on line to make contact with the victim this system reduces the risk to the rescue team members The SureClip universal head is designed to hold a variety of auto locking carabiners in the open position and mount on a standard telescopic pole that provides from 8 to 25 feet of reach depending on the model For more information on this handy device contact Roco at 800 647 7626 Or for technical assistance ask for Pat Furr or one of our other knowledgeable instructors read more New Items for Your Rescue Toolkit Tuesday July 10 2012 If it s been a while since you ve updated your rescue equipment kit or attended a rescue class you may not be aware of some of the newer pieces of rescue gear that not only make your job safer but make it easier and more efficient as well The last decade has seen an explosion of emerging technologies that have allowed the design and manufacture of some really exciting and practical equipment In the coming weeks we will be reviewing some of the newer gear that you may not have had the opportunity to work with Hopefully this will provide the stimulus for you to get out there and find out what else you may be missing out on Pat Furr Roco Chief Instructor Technical Consultant The Omni Block Swiveling Pulley This first item is one of my personal favorites There is a story behind it but I will have to save that for a time when we may meet out in the field The Omni Block Swiveling Pulley designed by Rock Thompson of Rock Exotica combines some unique features that save time and weight while increasing the efficiency of virtually every type of pulley system CMC s version of this pulley the CMC Prusik Minding Swivel Pulley meets NFPA G rating The feature of the Omni Block that I think is as important as the built in swivel is the quick release side plate This proprietary design allows the rope to be loaded andunloaded into the pulley without having to remove the pulley from the anchor Depending on the application this provides a new level of ease for systems incorporating temporary directional pulleys and really reduces the chance that gear may be dropped This is especially important for rescuers that are building systems while at height such as with tower rescue operations The swivel feature has proven to be a huge improvement that eliminates the need for an additional separate swivel and additional carabiner thus saving weight and expense But the true benefit of the swivel in addition to eliminating side plate chaffing is that any twists inadvertently built into an MA system practically spin out on their own once the system is loaded For the rare occasions that twists do not spin out on their own it s just a matter of quickly rotating the pulley manually to remove any twists Again stay tuned as we continue to review some of the newer pieces of rescue gear in the coming weeks read more SKED Procedural Change with Cobra Replacement Buckles Thursday May 24 2012 Here at Roco we have recently discovered a minor issue when the SKED stretcher is updated with Cobra buckles The Cobra buckle replacement system is attached by girth hitching the components into the grommets The girth hitch takes up more room in the grommets than the sewn loop that was previously used This makes it more difficult to pass the vertical bridle rope through the grommet holes that we re accustomed to using Skedco was contacted and has approved the following alternative method see photo After tying a square knot at the bottom of the SKED bring the tail ends of the rope back up and pass them through the bottom grommet hole of the handles before tying the second square knot Note Handle holes may be used with the old style buckle system read more NOTICE Statement on special use of the Petzl Shunt Friday January 20 2012 Petzl has published a statement addressing special use of the Petzl Shunt as a back up device for industrial rope access For any users of the Petzl Shunt as a self belay device such as tower rescuers the same information applies For Roco Tower Work and Rescue students who were taught the use of the Shunt as a self belay device and have not attended Roco s Tower Work and Rescue refresher training in the past two years please read this information For recent initial and refresher students of Roco s Tower Work and Rescue class students were taught to use the Petzl ASAP as their self belay device Roco still encourages all prior Roco Tower students to review the Petzl statement to become familiar with their concerns regarding the use of the Shunt as a back up device To request a NEW Roco Training Equipment Catalog or our 2012 Course Schedule call us at 800 647 7626 read more The Petzl story It s in the DNA Thursday December 15 2011 This is how Petzl began in my father s 75 square meter workshop My family my father mother brother wife and I designed the first tools for verticality and the first underground lamps which lead in 1972 to the Petzl headlamp Roco recently had the opportunity to interview Paul Petzl President of Petzl He shared with us some insight on the history and success of his company which is headquartered in Crolles France We know your father Fernand a cave explorer started the company in the mid 1970 s But isn t it true that the beginnings of Petzl go back farther than that Fernand Petzl was born in 1913 He was a passionate caver all his life In the 1930s he and his brothers explored the caves of the Dent de Crolles near Grenoble Then in 1936 he met Pierre Chevalier together they explored and charted the first 17 km of galleries there and obtained the first depth record in the world of caving It was Chevalier who had the idea to make the first nylon rope for use in caving which he tested with my father in the Dent de Crolles The early 1950s was a very active time in caving Fernand was appointed leader of the Gouffre Berger international expedition which reached a depth of 1 122 meters a new world record From 1960 to 1970 Fernand put a lot into cave rescue developing in his small workshop some unique but very handy objects such as a litter a pulley and other systems to facilitate underground rescue In 1969 Fernand with my brother Peter started manufacturing a descender and a belay device designed by a caver named Bruno Dressler This time was also a turning point in caving as ropes replaced ladders as the sole means of vertical movement This technique had already been developed by Jumar for mountaineering but cavers took the technique and adapted it for underground use And this is how Petzl began in my father s 75 square meter workshop My family my father mother brother wife and I designed the first tools for verticality and the first underground lamps which lead in 1972 to the Petzl headlamp What is the most innovative device Petzl has ever created Simplicity and efficiency for the user have always been primary goals in Petzl innovations For example on the first headlamp we designed we put the battery on the elastic headband This might seem obvious to experienced users but we were the first to do it When Fernand invented the SHUNT a mechanical prussic he created a device that could ascend or descend on one or two ropes even if those ropes were muddy or frozen We also created the TIBLOC the lightest ascender in the world with no moving parts But the GRIGRI is without a doubt the most iconic Petzl tool which was first designed for climbing and later adapted for professional use The EXO and the GRILLION are both based on the GRIGRI s design The EXO is currently being used by fire departments around the United States as a solution for emergency escape and descent while the GRILLON is a positioning lanyard for professionals I would never have imagined that the GRIGRI would be so useful for so many different types of customers It s because of our customers who have used this tool in various capacities that we ve been able to adapt it so well In fact Petzl does not seek primarily to meet the market but to solve a problem It is an approach guided more by the solution than by business This is probably why we have been such an innovative company and our innovations have helped progression across many disciplines Here at Roco we are big fans of the Petzl ID and so are our students We know that one of your focal points is innovation Are you working on other decent control devices I think it s important to understand why we designed the ID in the first place Petzl began working with rope access workers in the 1990s when this professional activity was just getting started At this time most rope access companies were run by cavers a group we knew well It was easy with them we spoke the same language But things changed when we encountered more traditional professionals We were not recognized indeed we were rejected as acrobats people interested only in fun not professionals And at first most of these professionals rejected the rope as a means of vertical movement So we imagined a solution to convert them a descender that was both reliable and that would reduce the possibility of user error as much as possible Today the ID is used by professionals worldwide and has become a key component in technical rescue applications Since its launch in 2000 we have made several modifications to the product based on user feedback One modification involved adding a button on the descent handle offering increased control when operating on inclines And in response to a specific request coming from the North American fire rescue market we removed the safety catch from the ID L side plate allowing the device to meet the general use requirements of NFPA 1983 In early 2010 we launched a new descent control device called the RIG The design and functionality of this device is geared towards experienced rope access technicians who require a simple descender for day to day use in many different types of environment Put simply we re always innovating Developing solutions to help people access the vertical world is at the core of our mission and we re just getting started In fact we re currently building a new facility for our R D division In your corporate video you say how important it is to work with end users in the development of products How do climbers mountaineers cavers and working at height professionals get ideas to you When Petzl is considering new products prototype samples are sent to Petzl prescriptors experts in their fields who can provide very specific feedback on product design and functionality This occurs years before we finalize the product We also appreciate and consider the constant feedback we receive from end users via the contact form on our website or other channels Because we offer solutions for professionals and those in the sport world we re able to cross pollinate taking the best ideas from all across the vertical world I think that the best example of this is the GRIGRI which was designed first for the caver then adapted for the climber then for the arborist and finally for fire departments around the United States It is often the user who sees the possible uses of the product It is the excellent relationship we ve had with our end users that has inspired our curiosity and driven our desire to please It is a field based approach used by our R D engineers who are passionate about verticality in the sport and professional realms Several products relative to rescue are now tested to the NFPA 1983 standard here in the United States Do you see more Petzl products having US certifications in the future Many of our key rescue products including harnesses ropes pulleys connectors descenders and ascenders are certified to meet NFPA 1983 standards Because Petzl is a global company it is challenging to meet the domestic certification requirements of the more than 50 countries in which we distribute our products Our hope is that international standards such as ISO will become more universally adopted in the countries in which we distribute For example our NAVAHO BOD harness currently carries four different certifications from four different bodies EN CSA ANSI and NFPA This creates a lengthy list of equipment performance and labeling requirements on such products Tell us about the Petzl Foundation and

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/equipment/page/2/ (2016-02-15)
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  • RescueTalk™
    Some of the lanyards are missing a safety stitch on the attachment loop which could cause the lanyard to separate from the climbing harness the posted announcement states No injuries have been reported in the U S but one fall injury in France has been Consumers should stop using them immediately CPSC notes that it is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product The lanyards were made in France All Scorpio and Absorbica lanyards manufactured before May 2011 are included Scorpio lanyards manufactured between 2002 and 2005 with model numbers L60 and L60 CK which are yellow and blue Y shaped lanyards with yellow stitching on both ends connected by a metal O ring to one end of a blue pouch containing the tear webbing shock absorber are included The pouch has a tag on it with the word PETZL in white letters and the other end of the blue pouch has a blue and yellow webbing attachment loop that connects to the climbing harness Scorpio lanyards manufactured between 2005 and 2011 are model numbers L60 2 L60 2CK L60 H and L60 WL They are red Y shaped lanyards connected by a black metal O ring to one end of a grey zippered pouch containing the tear webbing shock absorber The other end of the pouch has a black webbing attachment loop that connects to the climber s harness Absorbica lanyards included in the recall have model numbers L70150 I L70150 IM L70150 Y L70150 YM L57 L58 L58 MGO L59 and L59 MGO They have a black zippered pouch with yellow trim and the Petzl logo on the side and a tear webbing shock absorber accessible through the zippered pouch The pouch has a connector attachment on one end and a connector attachment a single lanyard or a Y shaped lanyard on the other end Authorized Petzl dealers in the United States and Canada sold them from January 2002 through May 2011 For a free inspection and replacement contact Petzl America Inc at 877 740 3826 between 8 a m and 5 p m Mountain time weekdays or visit Petzl s website read more Petzl Recall for GriGri 2 s Friday July 01 2011 For our readers who may use Petzl GriGri 2 s we wanted to make you aware of this recall Please check the serial number of your device to see if it s in this range You will also need to contact Petzl as indicated below As noted this does not apply to the previous generation GriGri NOTICE FROM PETZL As a measure of precaution Petzl has decided to take the following actions Increase the mechanical strength of the handle on all GRIGRI 2 s since serial number 11137 Recall all GRIGRI 2 s with the first five digits of the serial number between 10326 and 11136 and replace with a new revised GRIGRI 2 Petzl will pay for all shipping costs to complete this replacement If you have a GRIGRI 2 D14 2O D14 2G D14 2B with the first five digits of the serial number between 10326 and 11136 stop use immediately and contact Petzl America to initiate an exchange Contact Petzl America in one of two ways By phone 1 800 932 2978 toll free By email grigri2recall petzl com The previous generation GRIGRI is not concerned by this recall read more What does ASTM say about Rope Inspection Monday June 06 2011 ASTM F1740 provides very comprehensive guidelines for users of rescue rope The title Standard Guide for Inspection of Nylon Polyester or Nylon Polyester Blend or Both Kernmantle Rope indicates it is specifically intended to guide the user in the inspection of these rescue ropes and is not intended to be a guide in the selection and use of rescue ropes However the information included in F1740 is not to be considered the only criteria for evaluating the serviceability of rescue rope One of the first considerations the user needs to address is the selection of an experienced individual who is deemed qualified to perform and document the rope inspections While F1740 does provide excellent guidelines the user and or the Authority Having Jurisdiction AHJ may feel it necessary to augment the information in F1740 with additional training Fortunately our friends at PMI Rope have produced a very comprehensive webinar on Rope Care which includes specific information on rope inspections This 61 minute webinar is presented by Mr Steve Hudson president of PMI Rope Steve has an unsurpassed background and knowledge base regarding the manufacture and use of rescue rope and his presentation should more than satisfy your need to augment F1740 Click here for a link to PMI s webinars Use the scroll down on the left and select the 3 2 10 presentation titled Rope Care The information that addresses rope inspection begins at the 24 30 time mark of the presentation RocoRescue com offers PMI rescue rope for rescue professionals Please contact Roco at 800 647 7626 if you have any further questions read more Rope Care Cleaning Tips Wednesday May 25 2011 Life safety rope is an essential tool for rescue operations It is your responsibility to learn and understand the capabilities and limitations of your life safety rope before using it Be sure to read the manufacturer s instructions for the use care and maintenance Always double check that the specifications of the rope match the intended use Keeping your rope clean is essential Dirt rubbing into and against the fibers of your rope will deteriorate it Here are some suggestions from PMI for cleaning static kernmantle rope Wash it You can wash dirty ropes by hand or in a front loading commercial washing machine using cold to warm water with a mild sap Non detergent soaps are best but a mild detergent is acceptable if used sparingly In any case the soap used should not contain bleaching agents Avoid top loading washing machines with agitators because they tangle the rope

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/equipment/page/3/ (2016-02-15)
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