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  • RescueTalk™
    For off site services is the service willing to perform rescues at the employer s workplace An employer may not rely on a rescuer who declines for whatever reason to provide rescue services Also while a written agreement with the local agency is not necessarily required by the regulation it certainly would make it easier to document that an agreement to respond was in place and that the department had an understanding of the scope of services to be provided at the employer s site i e confined space rescue read more Cleaning Your Rope Here s What the Experts Have to Say Wednesday July 27 2011 We are often asked How should I maintain my rescue equipment especially rope So we went to our friends at CMC and PMI for the answers Keep in mind however you should always follow your rope manufacturer s care and cleaning instructions CMC offers their rope cleaning suggestions Rinse off muddy or especially dirty rope or web with water Scrub any tough spots with a nylon bristle brush Soak the rope in a tub of water with a mild detergent Woolite or other mild detergents that are safe for nylon may also be used The rope can be rinsed using a rope washer or placed directly into the washing machine Washing rope and webbing in a top loading washing machine is the easiest method Run the empty machine through a cycle with plain water to rinse any harsh detergents from the machine before starting Use cold water and the appropriate amount of detergent Double the rope or web and daisy chain it This keeps single lines from tangling or getting caught in the agitator Put the rope in the machine and wash on the gentle cycle If the rope bag needs washing put it in with the rope During the rinse cycle add a small amount of Downy fabric softener No more than one ounce of Downy to 3 gallons of water The fabric softener replaces the lubricant the rope loses during use and washing Air dry the rope and webbing in a cool shaded place Do NOT dry nylon products in the sun because of the damaging effects on nylon from prolonged exposure to ultraviolet rays If necessary ropes can be stuffed into the bags wet The ropes may mildew but this does not adversely affect the rope Rope that has come into contact with blood or other body fluids can be cleaned using a chlorine bleach per your department s protocols for contaminating equipment PMI offers special precautions about cleaning exposed rope In cases where equipment may be exposed to blood borne pathogens or other infectious substances we re often asked about appropriate methods for cleaning ropes Certain authorities recommend specific concentrations of household bleach for disinfecting gear that has been exposed to certain contaminants so naturally customers often wonder at what concentration their PMI rope will experience deterioration While PMI cannot speak to the subject of infectious diseases or what solution might neutralize a given hazardous substance we are happy to provide at least some guidance regarding the effect of bleach on rope fibers Specifically PMI has found that a mixture of 1 part household bleach with active ingredient of Sodium hypochlorite at 5 25 concentration with 9 parts room temperature tap water and a 10 minute or less exposure time immediately followed by a thorough rinse of room temperature water appears not to cause any appreciable harm to nylon or polyester ropes PMI cannot however speak to whether or not such a mixture will truly disinfect your rope from contaminants Precautionary Note PMI s testing suggests that a single disinfection of ropes using the above recommended method will not cause appreciable harm to nylon or polyester ropes However if this process is repeated multiple times the damage will inevitably become appreciable and this damage is not necessarily detectable through visual inspection Remember ropes are a critical element of the life safety system and it can be difficult to make subjective decisions about the strength of rope without actually testing it to failure The prudent course of action is to discard any rope about which there is any doubt read more What s the talk about individual retrieval lines Wednesday July 20 2011 Because it is important to keep our readers and students updated we wanted to share the following information with you Please note that this issue is not resolved as of this time and we have a letter submitted to OSHA for clarification However we wanted to keep you in the loop so that you can make better decisions when it comes to your rescue preplanning and operations It has recently come to our attention that there is a pending OSHA Letter of Interpretation LOI regarding the requirement for an individual retrieval line for each entrant This pending interpretation is different from our understanding of what s required by the regulation 1910 146 While this particular technique is one option of providing external retrieval there are other alternatives currently being used by rescuers As mentioned above Roco has submitted a detailed letter to OSHA for a clarification stating our position that the use of individual lines for entrants in all cases is problematic for a number of reasons Although OSHA s response in its letter of interpretation is ambiguous as to its applicability to entry rescue operations in our commitment to follow the intent of all OSHA standards Roco is assuming that OSHA s response was intended to apply to all entries including rescue entries Therefore we will teach and use individual lines for the time being until we get further clarification from OSHA Question to OSHA In a request for clarification a gentleman from Maryland had asked this question Does OSHA 1910 146 k 3 require that each individual entrant including workers and or rescuers entering into a confined space be provided with an independent retrieval line or can more than one entrant be connected to a single retrieval line OSHA s Response OSHA s response in the LOI states OSHA 1910 146 k 3 i requires that each authorized entrant into a permit required confined space must have a chest or full body harness attached to their individual retrieval line or life line to ensure immediate rescue of the entrant Roco Note It is important to note that individual retrieval line is not used in k 3 i it simply refers to a retrieval line The standard states Each authorized entrant shall use a chest or full body harness with a retrieval line attached at the center of the entrant s back near shoulder level above the entrant s head or at another point Additional Roco Comments First of all OSHA s Permit Required Confined Spaces Standard is for the most part a performance based standard meaning that it generally provides a result that is to be met but leaves the manner by which that result is to be obtained to the judgment of the employer This is particularly true of the rescue and retrieval requirements as the specific circumstances and conditions of each entry or rescue will dictate what equipment and techniques may be required However this pending Letter of Interpretation LOI regarding the use of retrieval lines in Confined Spaces crosses over into the area of specific equipment and techniques that must be used Consistent with the performance based nature of the standard Roco has taught for years a technique that uses a single retrieval line for multiple entrants as an option to reduce line entanglement hazards during a rescue The use of this technique was based on testimony given to OSHA prior to the Permit Required Confined Spaces Standard 29CFR 1910 146 being published and indeed our interpretation of the intent of the standard The particular technique in question is a common practice for rescuers in which one retrieval line is used and multiple entrant rescuers are attached at different intervals with butterfly knots to reduce entanglement hazards during a rescue see example below This pending interpretation would put restraints on techniques used by rescuers when entanglement issues could be a problem It would result in the management of multiple retrieval lines in the space which could affect the effectiveness of the rescue or result in an increased danger to the entrants and or rescuers In effect this OSHA interpretation could cause an all or nothing response regarding the use of retrieval lines for rescuers and entrants This LOI would eliminate the opportunity of using an external rescue technique for certain situations Paragraph k 3 allows entrants to forgo using a retrieval line in certain situations To facilitate non entry rescue retrieval systems or methods shall be used whenever an authorized entrant enters a permit space unless the retrieval equipment would increase the overall risk of entry or would not contribute to the rescue of the entrant The technique in question is an option that falls between each individual having an individual retrieval line and having to opt out of using a retrieval line at all and it allows for external retrieval to still be an option in many cases And as most of you know from personal experience for most confined space portals only one individual can pass through at a time anyway Even with multiple retrieval lines it is still a one at a time event A shared retrieval line allows the same to take place It is Roco s position that the rescue and retrieval techniques used in rescue should be performance based to allow for the ever changing conditions and problems that are unique to rescue We also feel this pending LOI could affect the safety and ability of rescuers to adjust to these situations However until this issue is clarified Roco will not teach or use the technique of having multiple rescuers entrants attached to the same retrieval line in consecutive order using midline knots as their attachment points read more What about rescue response for fallen workers at height Thursday July 14 2011 We recently received a question about what constitutes a prompt and capable rescue response for fallen workers at height suspended by their Personal Fall Arrest System PFAS Question My question concerns guidance on the number of rescue standby team members needed for response to worker at heights type incidents We work in a chemical plant so it s basically areas such as columns etc Answer OSHA guidance for rescue of fallen workers utilizing personal fall arrest systems PFAS is quite vague in that it calls for prompt rescue For more definitive guidance on the subject ANSI Z359 2 Para E6 1 recommends that contact with the rescue subject communication or physical contact should occur as soon as possible after the fall The recommended goal for rescue subject contact should be less than six minutes What constitutes prompt rescue can vary depending on the circumstances The type of potential hazards identified in the Fall Hazard Survey report should determine rescue planning For example if the work area exposes the worker to an IDLH condition such as energized equipment then the Fall Hazard Survey should trigger the Rescue Plan to include a near immediate rescue provision because of the potential of worker electrocution leading to a fall and subsequently a suspended victim In a situation like this it is imperative that prompt rescue would provide a means to have the rescue subject in a position that allows CPR in less than 6 minutes and preferably much faster than that The only way to respond this quickly is to have a Stand by Rescue posture where the rescue system and personnel are pre rigged and ready to initiate the rescue immediately For other situations if communications with the rescue subject are established in six minutes or less and it is determined that the victim is relatively unharmed alert and oriented good airway and breathing and no signs of active bleeding then the urgency is reduced and a more measured approach to the rescue could be employed There is still the potential for suspension trauma to develop over a range of several minutes so a prompt but measured rescue would still be necessary With this in mind it is important for an employer with workers at height to complete a Fall Hazard Survey report to determine the most appropriate way to abate any fall hazards If the use of PFAS is necessary that triggers the need to complete fallen worker Rescue Preplans The employer will need to identify the rescue assets and ensure they are available equipped and trained to perform safe and prompt rescue for any situation that they may be summoned to at the employer s facility For rescuers outside the employer s workforce it is important to thoroughly vet the prospective rescuers to make these assurances This information was provided by Pat Furr Roco Chief Instructor and Technical Consultant He regularly assists Roco customers in identifying opportunities to improve their fall protection programs and can guide safety professionals in the completion of Fall Hazard Survey reports Roco can also assist in the development of fallen worker Rescue Preplans For help with selecting the proper equipment or training call us at 800 647 7626 read more 1910 147 LOTO vs 1910 146 Isolation Wednesday July 06 2011 Question If I close and Lockout Tagout the main valve on the natural gas line supplying a boiler unit does this satisfy OSHA s requirement for eliminating the hazard of a permit required confined space Answer No it does not You are asking a question that we address quite often and it reveals some misconceptions regarding eliminating or isolating the permit space from hazards Lockout Tagout LOTO procedures are covered in OSHA s 1910 147 Control of Hazardous Energy Lockout Tagout Many times this regulation is incorrectly referenced when addressing permit space hazards that are not covered by this regulation OSHA s 1910 147 LOTO regulation applies to the control of electrical mechanical hydraulic pneumatic chemical thermal or other energy It does not apply to engulfment hazards liquid or flowable solids flammable gasses or other gasses that may be toxic or oxygen displacing It is important to understand this distinction because the use of isolation procedures appropriate for the hazards addressed in 1910 147 may not be effective in eliminating other hazards Isolation as defined in the Permit Required Confined Space regulation 1910 146 spells out the various measures required to eliminate hazardous energies as covered in the LOTO regulation as well as the types of hazards that are not addressed in that regulation You will note that 1910 146 cites LOTO as a means to isolate all sources of energy emphasis added but outlines other methods used to isolate the other hazards such as hazardous materials These isolation procedures include the process by which a permit space is removed from service and completely protected against the release of energy and material into the space by such means as blanking or blinding misaligning or removing sections of lines pipes or ducts a double block and bleed system lockout or tagout of all sources of energy or blocking or disconnecting all mechanical linkages By closing and placing a LOTO device on a single valve of a natural gas feed line you may have controlled the hazard but you have not eliminated it To provide true isolation elimination you will have to employ such means as blanking or blinding misaligning or removing sections of lines pipes or ducts or a double block and bleed system Download the LOTO tip sheet from NIOSH read more What does ASTM say about Rope Inspection Monday June 06 2011 ASTM F1740 provides very comprehensive guidelines for users of rescue rope The title Standard Guide for Inspection of Nylon Polyester or Nylon Polyester Blend or Both Kernmantle Rope indicates it is specifically intended to guide the user in the inspection of these rescue ropes and is not intended to be a guide in the selection and use of rescue ropes However the information included in F1740 is not to be considered the only criteria for evaluating the serviceability of rescue rope One of the first considerations the user needs to address is the selection of an experienced individual who is deemed qualified to perform and document the rope inspections While F1740 does provide excellent guidelines the user and or the Authority Having Jurisdiction AHJ may feel it necessary to augment the information in F1740 with additional training Fortunately our friends at PMI Rope have produced a very comprehensive webinar on Rope Care which includes specific information on rope inspections This 61 minute webinar is presented by Mr Steve Hudson president of PMI Rope Steve has an unsurpassed background and knowledge base regarding the manufacture and use of rescue rope and his presentation should more than satisfy your need to augment F1740 Click here for a link to PMI s webinars Use the scroll down on the left and select the 3 2 10 presentation titled Rope Care The information that addresses rope inspection begins at the 24 30 time mark of the presentation RocoRescue com offers PMI rescue rope for rescue professionals Please contact Roco at 800 647 7626 if you have any further questions read more Rescue Plans What is required Tuesday April 12 2011 We had a very interesting inquiry regarding OSHA s requirements for rescue plans and wanted to share it with you Reader s Question Does OSHA 1910 146 k 1 v state that a plan must be developed by a rescue service before an entry can be made Can entries be conducted with the understanding that a rescue service has the competence to rescue someone without seeing the space prior Section k 1 v of the regulation states that the employer shall Provide the rescue team or service selected with access to all permit spaces from which rescue may be necessary so that the rescue service can develop appropriate rescue plans

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/questions_and_answers/page/2/ (2016-02-15)
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  • RescueTalk™
    arise read more Is a tailboard briefing enough prior to a confined space entry Monday November 08 2010 We had this question from a reader and wanted to post for all to read Would a proper tailboard briefing conducted before a confined space entry be sufficient for identifying hazards that may be encountered by the entrants or the rescue team It s true that a tailboard briefing should be an integral part of the larger overall preplanning for a confined space entry However well in advance of the entry a detailed hazard analysis of the space should be performed A hazard analysis is used to identify the types of hazards lock out tag out needs PPE required for entry method of entry and important rescue considerations In fact OSHA requires these written assessments to be completed prior to an entry being made and the confined space permit acts as a secondary written assessment performed at the time of the entry Here are some OSHA references concerning this topic 1910 146 c 5 ii H The employer shall verify that the space is safe for entry and that the pre entry measures required by paragraph c 5 ii of this section have been taken through a written certification that contains the date the location of the space and the signature of the person providing the certification The certification shall be made before entry and shall be made available to each employee entering the space or to that employee s authorized representative 1910 146 d 2 Identify and evaluate the hazards of permit spaces before employees enter them 1910 146 d 3 Develop and implement the means procedures and practices necessary for safe permit space entry operations The tailboard briefing should be used to confirm or reinforce the information already gathered in the hazard analysis Because it deals with an individual space at the time of entry the tailboard briefing is also a very useful tool in finding out if conditions have changed since the hazard analysis was completed So the bottom line having a detailed hazard analysis for each space that includes a detailed rescue preplan allows a rescue team to review and prepare for potential problems well in advance Reviewing this information at a tailboard briefing just prior to the entry helps to remind everyone of the possible hazards the proper precautions and the potential solutions should an emergency occur read more To Pre rig or not to Pre rig Monday September 27 2010 We received an interesting question about pre rigged systems from one of our subscribers The TechPanel had some helpful comments to share so we have re posted the info here It s a great topic Here are some things to consider about leaving systems pre rigged First of all whether to pre rig systems or not depends a lot on the types of rescues you will be doing Pre rigged systems make sense for most industrial and municipal teams who have rope equipment designated specifically for rescues However it makes less sense for climbers and wilderness personnel who will be using the same equipment for multiple uses and putting systems together based on a specific need This also reduces the amount and weight of equipment they must carry which is a big concern However it also requires a high level of proficiency in a variety of systems in order to build systems safely and in a timely manner Next let s clarify what we mean by pre rigged systems Plug n Play These are systems that come pre built and seem to require little training to operate These Plug n Play systems may work for a specific location or type of rescue but may not work in every situation Training for these systems should address what to do if the device system malfunctions or if it will not work for the type of scenario you may be faced with Customized Pre rigged Systems These are customized pre rigged systems that rescuers build for site specific needs and their team s needs using existing equipment and training Confined space and rope rescue can be broken down to three core tasks 1 Lowering 2 Safety line Belay and 3 Mechanical Advantage Retrieval systems You can build pre rigged systems that make sense for your specific needs Many of the teams we work with have adopted a three bag system For example one rope bag is designated for Lowering along with the typical equipment needed for a lowering system i e descent control device carabiners anchor straps padding This will provide a pre rigged system that will handle most of your lowering needs You may decide to supplement that with another anchor strap and a pulley for a high point directional etc Your Safety line Belay bag can be set up the same way with enough carabiners and shock absorbers attached to the rope bag to allow for at least two rescuers and a victim The third bag of rope Mechanical Advantage Retrieval with a simple pre built Block n Tackle hauling system and its own anchor straps will give your team an immediate means of retrieval for either the main line or a safety line retrieval With a few additional pieces of hardware you will be able handle the vast majority of urban rope confined space rescue scenarios We find that for industrial rescue teams or municipal fire and police rescue squads these pre rigged systems make sense They save set up time and get a rescuer to the victim as quickly as possible which is especially critical for an IDLH emergency Many times teams will arrange their equipment so that it s easier to inventory rather than what s the fastest way to deploy it For example if you have twenty carabiners why not have them attached to a rapid deployment bag type system rather than in a hardware bag that a team member will have to go through and pick out what is needed Our best

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/questions_and_answers/page/3/ (2016-02-15)
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  • RescueTalk™
    leaned over the edge This could possibly damage the feet because of the angle at which they are turned i e the feet are pointed toward the center of the triangle formed by the tripod This angle places the weight of the tripod onto the edges of the feet and that is not what they are designed for Skedco also says that when using the Sked Evac tripod as an A frame it is necessary to attach ropes to the two unused anchors that are attached to the head You can do this by using carabiners Tie the tripod back in the opposite direction from the load that is being hoisted This will prevent the tripod from leaning too far over the edge and causing the system to collapse Check all rigging and attachments for safety prior to lifting any load especially a human load The improper use of any tripod is very dangerous and could be fatal It is the responsibility of the user to get proper training prior to using a tripod or any other rescue equipment read more Can a munter hitch be used with a two person load Thursday July 01 2010 Yes with a couple of extra precautions The rope should run over an edge for extra control A line tender should be added to assist the primary belayer read more What are three levels of protection required by OSHA for confined space entrants Thursday June 24 2010 The three levels of protection required by OSHA for confined space entrants are 1 Hazard Awareness 2 Retrieval Equipment 3 Rescue Services read more Does the confined space entrant need to use a harness and lifeline or retrieval system even when a trained rescue team is on site Wednesday June 09 2010 Yes A retrieval system should

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/questions_and_answers/page/4/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Roco QUICK DRILL #4
    experience that should pay off in the long run if needed during a real life emergency 1 Identify the knots your team uses and where they are used in various systems 2 Lay out a series of applications where team members would need to tie a knot Decide in advance what knots are acceptable in these applications since many times more than one knot may get the job done 3 Once you have established the acceptable knots lay out a gauntlet of knot tying stations 4 Each team member will go through each station first deciding which knot to use and then tying it as it would be used in the application examples end knot in a lower line vertical bridle knot lashing a backboard adjustable anchor self equalizing anchor etc The goal is to have team members choose an appropriate knot tie it correctly and apply it properly based on the rescue system presented Two examples for knot stations are 1 Backboard lashing have the lashing complete except for the knot at the end and 2 Mainline rigged except for the knot attaching it to the anchor CHECK OUT OUR RESCUE KNOT VIDEO SERIES Download the Rescue Knots PDF Previous Next New Stuff Atmospheric Monitors May NOT Detect All Dangers Roco QUICK DRILL 10 Tripod Quick Drill Service Life Guidelines for Rescue Equipment NFPA Issues New Guide for Confined Spaces Gravedigger Engulfed In Cave in of Unguarded Grave Hot Topics ATMOSPHERIC HAZARDS 6 CONFINED SPACE 58 EQUIPMENT 36 FALL PROTECTION 16 FIRE FIGHTERS 1 HOW TO VIDEOS 6 INCIDENTS 27 MISCELLANEOUS 40 NEWS 90 OSHA MEMORANDUM 2 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 36 QUICK DRILLS 12 REGULATIONS 31 SAFETY 55 STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE 5 TECHNIQUES 23 TRAINING 6 TRENCH 10 RescueTalk RocoRescue com has been created as a free resource for sharing

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/roco-quick-drill-4 (2016-02-15)
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  • Roco QUICK DRILL #3
    with safeties as required within 30 seconds This gives us a good idea of the student s proficiency in the basics of knot tying Here s a knot drill that we recommend 1 Give each team member a length of rope and a piece of webbing Note Some knots will require an object to tie around 2 In a room capable of being darkened call out the name of the knot to be tied and then turn off the lights As each person finishes have them shout Completed 3 Once all members have completed the knot turn on the lights and check for accuracy Having the lights off during this drill forces rescuers to use their other senses in remembering how to tie the knots It helps to reinforce their skills and is an excellent way to identify the individual knot s that may require more practice for increased proficiency When the pressure is on as in a real rescue you need to be able to count on all your team members to tie the needed knot in a timely and accurate manner CHECK OUT OUR RESCUE KNOT VIDEO SERIES Download the Rescue Knots PDF Previous Next New Stuff Atmospheric Monitors May NOT Detect All Dangers Roco QUICK DRILL 10 Tripod Quick Drill Service Life Guidelines for Rescue Equipment NFPA Issues New Guide for Confined Spaces Gravedigger Engulfed In Cave in of Unguarded Grave Hot Topics ATMOSPHERIC HAZARDS 6 CONFINED SPACE 58 EQUIPMENT 36 FALL PROTECTION 16 FIRE FIGHTERS 1 HOW TO VIDEOS 6 INCIDENTS 27 MISCELLANEOUS 40 NEWS 90 OSHA MEMORANDUM 2 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 36 QUICK DRILLS 12 REGULATIONS 31 SAFETY 55 STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE 5 TECHNIQUES 23 TRAINING 6 TRENCH 10 RescueTalk RocoRescue com has been created as a free resource for sharing insightful information news views and

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/roco-quick-drill-3 (2016-02-15)
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  • Roco QUICK DRILL #2
    of key elements It is also a good emergency drill for situations that may require a better understanding of PPE at a time when vision may be restricted We want you to make the most of every rescue practice session so our Roco instructors have created Quick Drills that can be used any time you have a few minutes to practice with your team In order to have a well rounded rescue team it is so important to maximize your training time and rotate the skills practiced to keep everyone interested and involved Make sure you cover the basics as well as any techniques or special needs that may be unique to your response area As always practice practice practice And make sure you have the proper training and equipment to safely and effectively do your job Previous Next New Stuff Atmospheric Monitors May NOT Detect All Dangers Roco QUICK DRILL 10 Tripod Quick Drill Service Life Guidelines for Rescue Equipment NFPA Issues New Guide for Confined Spaces Gravedigger Engulfed In Cave in of Unguarded Grave Hot Topics ATMOSPHERIC HAZARDS 6 CONFINED SPACE 58 EQUIPMENT 36 FALL PROTECTION 16 FIRE FIGHTERS 1 HOW TO VIDEOS 6 INCIDENTS 27 MISCELLANEOUS 40

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/quickdrill2 (2016-02-15)
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  • Roco Quick Drill No.1 First 10 Minutes on the Emergency SceneScene
    currently stored and set up for response Give team members the scenario and have them start At the 10 minute mark stop the scenario Document how much of the scenario the team was able to complete in 10 minutes Debrief the team and then ask questions such as What could you have done differently in your particular assignment to advance the team s progress in this scenario in a shorter period of time Evaluate the type of rigging used and the sequence in which it was performed For example were systems rigged in the order that they will be needed Or was time wasted on rigging that would not be needed until extraction of the patient Was the team waiting for a high point or tripod to be set up before rescuers were inserted Could equipment have been staged differently For example was equipment for the main and safety lines pre rigged in an accessible layout and in sufficient quantities or did the team have to search for more gear Use this information to rearrange the team s equipment as needed Could you pre rig more items like packaging and hauling systems Make the changes and repeat the scenario to see what works and what doesn t Document how much was accomplished each time the scenario is repeated After two or three repetitions you should be able to hone the team s equipment requirements and reduce times Next move to a new scenario and repeat the process Each time documenting the progress made and what was changed to improve performance Be sure to document all input and changes agreed upon Make sure these changes and improvements are incorporated in your team s operational planning Remember the overall goal is to get a rescuer to the patient in a timelier manner

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/qdrill01 (2016-02-15)
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  • RescueTalk™
    would make existing rescue plans ineffective If so update the plans and practice any new procedures that the new plans may have generated 5 Sign up for Roco s Rescue Challenge This is a great opportunity to share ideas with other rescuers and learn new ways to approach your rescue response It also satisfies annual practice requirements for individuals and rescue teams read more Practice for the Unexpected Wednesday November 17 2010 Helpful tips from Roco Chief Instructor Pat Furr Is your rescue team in a rut Do you end up practicing the same two or three rescue scenarios during your training drills If you answered yes then your re probably getting bored or worse yet you may be setting your team up for failure when confronted with an emergency that s different than what you have repeatedly practiced Think outside the box a little Come up with some What ifs that are different than what you normally practice Of course you need to keep it realistic and appropriate for your response area don t waste your time practicing scenarios that have no chance of actually occurring However do challenge your team to the unexpected scenario in practice before you face it in real life Rescue teams must also take into consideration the types of confined spaces with respect to opening size configuration and accessibility within their response area when determining practice drills OSHA requires practice from the actual or representative permit spaces at least once a year For municipal responders we recommend that they be prepared for all six confined space types because they never know what type of situation they may face Download Roco s Confined Space Types Chart If you re the one who s responsible for setting up proficiency training for your team ask your team members to come up with some ideas that are different from your typical drill You might be surprised with what they come up with If you re a team member approach your training manager with some suggestions to change things up a bit Once the idea is planted and your team starts to run a variety of training scenarios the idea will catch on In fact team members may try to outdo each other on coming up with the next new scenario Here at Roco we know that one of the most popular training blocks for our students is the infamous Yellow Brick Road This is a multi station scenario where rescuers must think on their feet and adapt to an ever changing situation It is always challenging and gratifying for the teams For those of you that have had me as an instructor you know that I will be throwing a wrench into the mix somewhere along the road Of course we all know that our victims don t read the training manuals they re always coming up with new and different ways to get into trouble If and when your team is faced with a rescue that is

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/quick_drills/page/2/ (2016-02-15)
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