archive-com.com » COM » R » ROCORESCUE.COM

Total: 257

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • RescueTalk™
    or a health hazard a simple asphyxiant combustible dust pyrophoric gas or hazard not otherwise classified As explained by OSHA in its Guidance for Hazard Determination The definition of a chemical in the HCS Hazard Communication Standard is much broader than that which is commonly used The HCS definition of chemical is any element chemical compound or mixture of elements and or compounds According to this definition virtually any product is a chemical By this definition it would mean that air is considered a chemical under the standard and OSHA includes gas under pressure in its definition of physical hazards Consequently as one example the rescue team needs to look no further than its SCBA bottles or its air source for supplied air respirators and charged airlines to find a hazardous chemical for purposes of the HazCom standard Even facilities with comprehensive HazCom programs sometimes overlook their rescue team s air sources in their programs As a rescuer it s important to get familiar with the new formatting of Safety Data Sheets SDS and the GHS symbols now Make sure to review these standards in their entirety as well as your organization s HazCom policies and procedures You and your team will be more prepared as these changes are put into place Here s a quick guide to the new GHS symbols from OSHA which will be required by June 1 2015 Note These new OSHA pictograms do not replace the diamond shaped DOT labels required for the transport of chemicals Resources National Safety Council s newsletter Safer Workplaces OSHA Fact Sheet Hazard Communication Standard Final Rule OSHA Quick Card Hazard Communication Safety Data Sheets read more Input Deadline for NFPA 350 Fast Approaching Tuesday December 03 2013 Deadline January 3 2014 There s only about 30 days left to submit your input on the proposed NFPA 350 Best Practices Guide for Safe Confined Space Entry and Work If you are involved in any kind of confined space work or rescue municipal or industrial now is the time to offer your comments While it is currently listed as a Best Practices Guide that does not mean that at some point in the future it won t possibly become an NFPA Standard So whether you agree or disagree the time to offer your input is NOW Public comment will be accepted online until January 3 2014 Go to www nfpa org 350 In order to comment you must log in with your email and password or you can quickly create an account Click here to download the PDF version Note Download may take up to 3 minutes depending on your computer read more Suggested Operating Guidelines for Training Thursday November 07 2013 Suggested Operating Guidelines SOG written directives that establish a standard course of action on how a department intends to operate Most departments have SOGs for different rescue scenarios but often overlook the importance of establishing procedures for safe training A look at the stats reveals that while 10 of firefighter deaths occur in the line of duty more than 7 000 injuries occur each year during training SOGs for safe training operations should be developed by the Authority Having Jurisdiction AHJ Each department has different needs and the type of training can vary tremendously Even interdepartmental training varies Start by defining the who what where and when for your organization Simple but effective in establishing a comprehensive plan for safe training Who a The Instructor Who is allowed to conduct training What qualifications do they need prior to conducting training What training have they completed to make them a subject matter expert o n what they are about to teach Have they been trained to identify the potential hazards involved in the training and emergency procedures Do they have the knowledge to identify the proper and needed equipment to do the training Have they been trained to identify safe areas to conduct the training b The Student Who is allowed to participate in the training i e department members only full duty only physical requirements prerequisites etc What What type of training is to be allowed and to what extent or level of training What will be allowed as in service training vs what is allowed at the academy only An example of in service training might be patient packaging and reviewing M A systems while life loading lines may be academy only or only conducted when a designated instructor is present What hazards are associated with the training and what precautions need to be taken What laws and regulations are applicable to the training Where Where will the training be conducted Classroom apparatus floor roof of firehouse other field locations training prop only It is important that designated approved and pre identified areas be established in order to conduct safe and effective training When When will the training be conducted What about refresher training How often and when will training schedule cover all shifts and all personnel Is weather a factor when scheduling Off duty training or not Next Steps Organizing the Training Program Lesson plans outlines and a system to qualify those who will be giving the instruction should be mandatory especially when it comes to technical rescue training Fire departments have a tendency to fall back on having the experienced guy train the new guy Or the line officer may be responsible for teaching a technique he is not totally familiar with This works until somebody gets hurt We all know that criminal and civil litigation issues can bury a department and its command staff Appoint a Training Chief Officer who can identify the department s specific training needs put a plan in place and keep the team on the training track Identify risks write solid lesson plans and operating guidelines and create a solid schedule for training Detailed outlines should be established for each skill technique that is taught and should be accessible to trainers and trainees Send designated training officers to technical rescue courses that meet and issue certification to NFPA 1006 Note that most if not all rescue equipment comes with a warning from the manufacturer stating that the enclosed literature on the use and care of this equipment is no substitute to receiving proper training Enough said Conducting safe rescue training procedures should be included in any good SOG Establishing definite training protocols is the first step to avoiding injury or worse West Valley Fire s website has many sample Standard Operating Guidelines for download Congrats to that department for putting their ideas out there and sharing the info with the rest of us read more Proposed NFPA 350 Confined Space Guide Approved for Comments Saturday August 31 2013 NOTICE If you are involved in any kind of confined space work or rescue you need to read this document and offer your comments This applies to anyone who may work in or near confined spaces both industrial and municipal At a meeting earlier this month NFPA s Guide for Safe Confined Space Entry and Work Draft was approved for public comment by the NFPA Standards Council This document is designed as a best practices guide for those who work in and around confined spaces As with any document that attempts to be all inclusive it may work well for some while negatively affecting others Therefore it is very important that WE the public the people who will be using this type of document in real world applications offer our feedback Now is the time to offer comments and suggestions Comments as to what may or may not be feasible for your organization or what may have been overlooked in this document are a vital part of this NFPA process As contributing members for this document we are encouraging you to take the time to make your suggestions in order to create a practical guide that will be user friendly and provide for greater safety when working in confined spaces As you read it please keep in mind that it is currently listed as a Best Practices Guide However this does not mean that at some point in the future it won t possibly become an NFPA Standard This document could eventually affect the way you do your job so it s very important to all of us for it to be a safe practical best practices guide Every comment or suggestion must be addressed by the sub committees So whether you agree or disagree the time to offer your input is NOW Public comment will be accepted online until January 3 2014 Go to www nfpa org 350 In order to comment you must log in with your email and password or you can quickly create an account Click here to download the PDF version Note Download may take up to 3 minutes depending on your computer read more What is a Competent Person Tuesday July 24 2012 OSHA s definition of a Competent Person varies slightly depending on which standard preamble to final rule directive or standard interpretation it relates to This article from NSC s Safety Health publication points out some very important considerations regarding an employer s designation of a competent person for various work activities The common theme is that no single training course in and of itself can adequately prepare an individual to fulfill the role of this position For example at a minimum a comprehensive Competent Person training course should provide 1 A high level of understanding of the types of hazards typically encountered in that area of work 2 A solid review of applicable standards relating to that type of work and 3 A thorough understanding of types of solutions to control or eliminate the hazards These are just a few of the capabilities of a Competent Person What these courses cannot provide is the job experience gained by years of work in that particular industry and the authority to implement protective measures that only the employer can grant We encourage you to keep these things in mind when you are preparing your Competent Person for the job duties that he or she will be expected to fulfill Download the pdf What is a Competent Person from the National Safety Council s Safety Health publication July 2012 read more Lock Out Tag Out What Rescuers Need to Know Tuesday April 24 2012 The concept of LOTO is a great one and it works As rescuers we have to take the common industrial application and expand it to ensure that the rescue scene is safe and that we are controlling hazards at the point of contact with the victim or in a space where something has gone very wrong says Dennis O Connell Chief Instructor and Director of Training for Roco Rescue Although commonly referred to as the Lock out Tag out LOTO standard the actual title of 1910 147 is The Control of Hazardous Energy This title probably better describes it s true purpose and there s no doubt that the understanding of this concept has saved many lives and prevented countless injuries The LOTO standard covers the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment in which the energizing or start up of the machines or equipment or release of stored energy could harm employees It establishes OSHA s minimum performance requirements for the control of such hazardous energy Ref 1910 147 a 1 i The general concept of LOTO is that energy sources affecting the area in which servicing or maintenance is occurring are identified and locked in the Off position or in the case of mechanical hazards linkages are disconnected for the duration of the work Some type of lock or device is placed on the equipment by those performing the work However we ve found that if you ask different people to define LOTO you will get a variety of answers Not only will you get different definitions you ll also get varying information as to how and when LOTO is to be used and who is actually allowed to place locks or controls during the LOTO process OSHA CFR 1910 147 b has a very narrow and specific definition of who can perform lock out or tag out operations That definition does not include rescuers and actually there is good reason for that If you ask emergency responders about LOTO you ll generally find that their definition has been expanded well past the control of hazardous energy to cover most rescue operations This expanded safety mindset serves to protect both the rescuer s and the victim s from additional harm following an incident Rescuers usually define LOTO as making the scene safe or controlling and keeping machinery from moving or shifting during a rescue Unlike standard LOTO which is usually a systems approach rescuers are generally trying to control the environment near an entrapped victim As rescuers we often act outside the parameters of a LOTO procedure that may already be in place Because rescuers would best be defined under affected employees in a rescue where a LOTO procedure is in place we need to understand what OSHA CFR 1910 147 b says about authorized employees and affected employees Authorized employee A person who locks out or tags out machines or equipment in order to perform servicing or maintenance on that machine or equipment An affected employee becomes an authorized employee when that employee s duties include performing servicing or maintenance covered under this section Caveman translation A person that the employer says has the systems or mechanical knowledge and authority to safely lockout tagout a machine or space Affected employee An employee whose job requires him her to operate or use a machine or equipment on which servicing or maintenance is being performed under lock out or tag out or whose job requires him her to work in an area in which such servicing or maintenance is being performed Caveman translation I have to work in an area where LOTO is in place A nice definition can be found in 54FR36665 in the promulgation of the Control of Hazardous Energy Standard an affected employee is one who does not perform the servicing but whose responsibilities are performed in an area in which the energy control procedure is implemented and servicing operations are performed under that procedure The affected employee does not need to know how to perform lock out or tag out nor does that employee need to be trained in the detailed implementation of the energy control procedure Rather the affected employee need only be able to recognize when the energy control procedure is being implemented to identify the locks or tags being used and to understand the purpose of the procedure and the importance of not attempting to start up or use the equipment which has been locked out or tagged out There is good reason for these prohibitions Improperly performed LOTO can be just as dangerous if not more so than no LOTO at all Allowing LOTO to be performed by personnel who are not familiar with the processes and equipment to be locked out increases the chances of improper lock out The requirement that only employees actually performing the servicing and maintenance of equipment are allowed to lock out equipment is less of a concern for rescuers than may first appear and here s why Typically the person being rescued from a space that has hazardous energy sources is someone who has already performed LOTO If that person performed LOTO properly and the reason for the rescue is something other than exposure to a hazardous energy source the rescuers are not exposed because the victim obviously cannot remove his lock while he is being rescued If the victim performed the LOTO improperly and the rescuers discover the error the rescuers can then lock out the equipment as they see fit or as the rescue needs dictate without violating the standard because they are not locking out the equipment as part of the LOTO program They are locking the equipment out as part of making the area safe for rescue operations The Consequences Worker s Amputation in Turkey Shackle Leads to 318 000 Proposed Fine OSHA initiated an inspection after the July 20 2011 incident in which the employee s arm allegedly became caught in an energized turkey shackle line while the employee was working alone in a confined space Jan 24 2012 OSHA cited the company for 11 safety violations at its Wisconsin facility after a worker s arm was amputated below the shoulder while the individual was conducting cleaning activities in a confined space Proposed fines total 318 000 The company has a legal responsibility to follow established permit required confined space regulations to ensure that its employees are properly protected from known workplace hazards said Mark Hysell director of OSHA s Eau Claire Area Office Failing to ensure protection through appropriate training and adherence to OSHA regulations led to a worker losing an arm OSHA initiated an inspection after the July 20 2011 incident in which the employee s arm allegedly became caught in an energized turkey shackle line while the employee was working alone in a confined space Afterward the employee had to walk down a flight of 25 stairs and 200 feet across the production floor to get the attention of a co worker for assistance Four willful violations involve not following OSHA s permit required confined space regulations in the carbon dioxide tunnel room including failing to ensure that workers isolated the carbon dioxide gas supply line and locked out power to the shackle line prior to entering the room to conduct cleaning activities verify that electro mechanical and atmospheric hazards within the room were eliminated prior to workers entering the space test atmospheric conditions prior to allowing entry and provide an attendant during entries to the room Seven serious violations involve failing to provide fall protection provide rescue and emergency services equipment develop procedures to summon rescue and emergency services

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/regulations/page/2/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive


  • RescueTalk™
    OSHA In a request for clarification a gentleman from Maryland had asked this question Does OSHA 1910 146 k 3 require that each individual entrant including workers and or rescuers entering into a confined space be provided with an independent retrieval line or can more than one entrant be connected to a single retrieval line OSHA s Response OSHA s response in the LOI states OSHA 1910 146 k 3 i requires that each authorized entrant into a permit required confined space must have a chest or full body harness attached to their individual retrieval line or life line to ensure immediate rescue of the entrant Roco Note It is important to note that individual retrieval line is not used in k 3 i it simply refers to a retrieval line The standard states Each authorized entrant shall use a chest or full body harness with a retrieval line attached at the center of the entrant s back near shoulder level above the entrant s head or at another point Additional Roco Comments First of all OSHA s Permit Required Confined Spaces Standard is for the most part a performance based standard meaning that it generally provides a result that is to be met but leaves the manner by which that result is to be obtained to the judgment of the employer This is particularly true of the rescue and retrieval requirements as the specific circumstances and conditions of each entry or rescue will dictate what equipment and techniques may be required However this pending Letter of Interpretation LOI regarding the use of retrieval lines in Confined Spaces crosses over into the area of specific equipment and techniques that must be used Consistent with the performance based nature of the standard Roco has taught for years a technique that uses a single retrieval line for multiple entrants as an option to reduce line entanglement hazards during a rescue The use of this technique was based on testimony given to OSHA prior to the Permit Required Confined Spaces Standard 29CFR 1910 146 being published and indeed our interpretation of the intent of the standard The particular technique in question is a common practice for rescuers in which one retrieval line is used and multiple entrant rescuers are attached at different intervals with butterfly knots to reduce entanglement hazards during a rescue see example below This pending interpretation would put restraints on techniques used by rescuers when entanglement issues could be a problem It would result in the management of multiple retrieval lines in the space which could affect the effectiveness of the rescue or result in an increased danger to the entrants and or rescuers In effect this OSHA interpretation could cause an all or nothing response regarding the use of retrieval lines for rescuers and entrants This LOI would eliminate the opportunity of using an external rescue technique for certain situations Paragraph k 3 allows entrants to forgo using a retrieval line in certain situations To facilitate non entry rescue retrieval systems or methods shall be used whenever an authorized entrant enters a permit space unless the retrieval equipment would increase the overall risk of entry or would not contribute to the rescue of the entrant The technique in question is an option that falls between each individual having an individual retrieval line and having to opt out of using a retrieval line at all and it allows for external retrieval to still be an option in many cases And as most of you know from personal experience for most confined space portals only one individual can pass through at a time anyway Even with multiple retrieval lines it is still a one at a time event A shared retrieval line allows the same to take place It is Roco s position that the rescue and retrieval techniques used in rescue should be performance based to allow for the ever changing conditions and problems that are unique to rescue We also feel this pending LOI could affect the safety and ability of rescuers to adjust to these situations However until this issue is clarified Roco will not teach or use the technique of having multiple rescuers entrants attached to the same retrieval line in consecutive order using midline knots as their attachment points read more 1910 147 LOTO vs 1910 146 Isolation Wednesday July 06 2011 Question If I close and Lockout Tagout the main valve on the natural gas line supplying a boiler unit does this satisfy OSHA s requirement for eliminating the hazard of a permit required confined space Answer No it does not You are asking a question that we address quite often and it reveals some misconceptions regarding eliminating or isolating the permit space from hazards Lockout Tagout LOTO procedures are covered in OSHA s 1910 147 Control of Hazardous Energy Lockout Tagout Many times this regulation is incorrectly referenced when addressing permit space hazards that are not covered by this regulation OSHA s 1910 147 LOTO regulation applies to the control of electrical mechanical hydraulic pneumatic chemical thermal or other energy It does not apply to engulfment hazards liquid or flowable solids flammable gasses or other gasses that may be toxic or oxygen displacing It is important to understand this distinction because the use of isolation procedures appropriate for the hazards addressed in 1910 147 may not be effective in eliminating other hazards Isolation as defined in the Permit Required Confined Space regulation 1910 146 spells out the various measures required to eliminate hazardous energies as covered in the LOTO regulation as well as the types of hazards that are not addressed in that regulation You will note that 1910 146 cites LOTO as a means to isolate all sources of energy emphasis added but outlines other methods used to isolate the other hazards such as hazardous materials These isolation procedures include the process by which a permit space is removed from service and completely protected against the release of energy and material into the space by such means as blanking or blinding misaligning or removing sections of lines pipes or ducts a double block and bleed system lockout or tagout of all sources of energy or blocking or disconnecting all mechanical linkages By closing and placing a LOTO device on a single valve of a natural gas feed line you may have controlled the hazard but you have not eliminated it To provide true isolation elimination you will have to employ such means as blanking or blinding misaligning or removing sections of lines pipes or ducts or a double block and bleed system Download the LOTO tip sheet from NIOSH read more Rescue Plans What is required Tuesday April 12 2011 We had a very interesting inquiry regarding OSHA s requirements for rescue plans and wanted to share it with you Reader s Question Does OSHA 1910 146 k 1 v state that a plan must be developed by a rescue service before an entry can be made Can entries be conducted with the understanding that a rescue service has the competence to rescue someone without seeing the space prior Section k 1 v of the regulation states that the employer shall Provide the rescue team or service selected with access to all permit spaces from which rescue may be necessary so that the rescue service can develop appropriate rescue plans and practice rescue operations Emphasis added First of all it s important to note that the term plan as used in safety related regulations and standards such as the Permit Required Confined Space PRCS standard can have a more general meaning than what rescuers typically think of when they refer to rescue preplans When rescuers refer to rescue preplans what usually comes to mind is a very specific detailed plan for rescue from a particular space Although the regulations do not specifically state that a plan must be developed by a rescue service before an entry can be made the regulation assumes that a properly selected and evaluated rescue team or service will develop appropriate rescue plans and requires that rescuers be given access as necessary to develop those plans OSHA makes it very clear however in Non Mandatory Appendix F the Preamble to the Final Rule Summary and Explanation of the Final Rule and its Compliance Directive on Permit Required Confined Space that it interprets the regulation to require rescue plans See links below How specific a rescue plan must be in order to meet OSHA requirements can be determined by answering this question How detailed must the rescue plan be to enable me to safely perform a timely rescue from the permit required confined space being entered Generally speaking the simpler and more generic the space and the entry the simpler and less detailed the plan must be The more complex the space and the hazards the more specific and detailed the plan must be And the more likely the rescue service should see the space and or a representative space in advance As such the degree and content of the rescue plan should be determined by the rescue service and it must be provided access to do so Ultimately however it is the employer s responsibility to perform an adequate evaluation of the prospective rescue service The viability of the rescue plan should be demonstrated therefore proving that the rescue service is staffed equipped available and proficient in performing timely rescue from that particular space or representative space The employer must be confident that the rescue service can Talk the talk and walk the walk When evaluating the capabilities of a rescue service Non Mandatory Appendix F provides guidelines for doing so and specifically references rescue plans for the types of spaces involved It is also important for employers to note that while it is not mandatory that the evaluation is performed in exactly the same way you still have to reach the same result In other words it is a non mandatory means of meeting the mandatory requirements Section B 1 of Appendix F asks Does the rescue service have a plan for each of the kinds of permit space rescue operations at the facility Is the plan adequate for all types of rescue operations that may be needed at the facility Note Teams may practice in representative spaces or in spaces that are worst case or most restrictive with respect to internal configuration elevation and portal size Appendix F also offers recommendations for determining whether a space is truly representative of an actual space See link below You can also refer to Roco s Confined Space Types Chart click here to download which illustrates various confined space types for rescue practice and planning purposes In summary prior to permit required entry operations the employer must afford the selected rescue service access to the permit spaces they may respond to for the purposes of rescue planning The degree and content of the rescue plan should be determined by the rescue service The rescue service must be prepared and proficient in rescue from the same type s of confined spaces in terms of configuration access and hazards IMPORTANT The information in Roco Rescue Online is provided as a complimentary service for emergency response personnel It is a general information resource and is not intended as legal advice Because standards and regulations relating to this topic are typically performance based and compliance with those standards and regulation is often dependent on the specific circumstances and conditions at hand it is always important to carefully review all relevant standards and regulations and to follow the proper protocols specific to your company or agency ONLINE REFERENCES OSHA 1910 146 Appendix F OSHA CPL 02 00 100 5 5 1995 Application of the Permit Required Confined Spaces PRCS Standards 29 CFR 1910 146 Appendix D V Rescue D Combinations 1 a OSHA 1910 146 Permit Required Confined Spaces Section 2 II Summary and Explanation of the Final Rule read more Is there a regulation requiring rescuers to use respiratory protection that is one level higher than that required for the entrants Thursday November 18 2010 To our knowledge there is no regulatory requirement However we ve heard this before and have used it as well when stressing the importance of proper PPE for rescuers particularly when IDLH atmospheres may be involved Here s our thinking if the entrant s PPE did not provide adequate protection and he or she is now requiring rescue assistance then using their same level of protection isn t going to protect you either What triggers the use of a greater level of protection This comes from the rescuer s assessment of the hazards including the use of an independent atmospheric monitor from that used by the entrant s That s why it s so important for the rescue team to provide their own atmospheric monitoring equipment It also illustrates why written rescue preplans are so important you need to preplan what equipment and techniques will be required well in advance of an emergency It s critical the PPE selected must be adequate to protect the rescuers When preparing rescue preplans you must also take into consideration any unusual hazards or circumstances that may arise from any work being done inside or near the space For example special cleaning solvents might be used or other hazards may be introduced into the space by the workers Referencing and understanding the MSDS as well as listening to what your monitor is telling you are key factors in PPE determination OSHA does mention however if the atmospheric condition is unknown then it should be considered IDLH and the use of positive pressure SCBA SAR must be used This will protect you from low O2 levels and other inhalation dangers however you must also consider LEL LFL levels Other factors include non atmospheric conditions as well For example have you considered skin absorption hazards and what precautions must be taken So the bottom line the decision to go with breathing air for rescuers can be determined from your hazard assessment or in some cases by company policy and even required by OSHA when there s an unknown atmosphere involved Remember it s much better to be safe than sorry read more Are safety lines required in an actual rescue Friday September 24 2010 This question was submitted by Thomas Vitti from the Chevron Fire Dept in Salt Lake City Utah In the event of an actual rescue is a safety line necessary Good question the answer is YES and NO This question falls into somewhat of a gray area Much depends on what type of rescue you re doing who the safety line is for and most importantly the function of the safety line Here we ve put together our ideas in relation to OSHA regulations interpretations and our own rescue experience Then of course there s our motto There s a safe way and a SAFER way which we always keep in mind Most of the time the answer for rescuers is YES Again one of the most important questions in determining the answer is the function of the safety line during the particular rescue In most instances the safety line functions as fall protection and OSHA requires that all employees be protected from fall hazards That includes employees performing rescue As a rescuer it is expected that you would be capable of designing a rescue system that maintains two points of contact and meets all fall protection requirements For example if you the rescuer are being lowered into or out of a space you would be on a single system one point of contact and will therefore need another point of contact safety line to act as your second point of contact and fall protection In this instance your safety line functions as your fall protection Once you ve been lowered to the bottom of a confined space and you move away from the portal your safety line then functions as an external retrieval line However if it will not contribute to your rescue or will make it more hazardous according to OSHA 1910 146 the line is not necessary Is a safety line required for the person being rescued i e the victim For the most part YES it should be part of the preplan for that particular type of rescue While OSHA requires that all employees be protected from fall hazards if the patient s condition is critical heart attack suspended unconscious IDLH atmosphere etc and set up time for the safety line would cause a delay in getting the proper medical treatment the rescue team may be justified in not using a safety line for the victim patient Additionally certain circumstances may not require the application of a safety line system for the victim For instance if an employee falls and is suspended by a fall arrest system you don t need to add another safety line to do the rescue Roco s recommendation YES a safety line is always required for a rescuer even in a confined space where it can also be used for communication purposes Safety lines for the victim patient are also highly recommended when the victim will be suspended But we also realize that there may be life or death circumstances when quickness of rescue is more important than the added precaution of using a safety line on the patient Because Fed OSHA does not specifically address this issue in certain circumstances it may be justifiable not to do so It is understood that there are unexpected emergency events with many possible mitigating factors to deal with making it impossible to regulate every potential scenario So this leaves some room for judgment based on the circumstances But if your justification is that you did not have sufficiently trained personnel or sufficient equipment to employ a safety line fall protection system OSHA is likely to conclude that you were not properly prepared to perform rescue

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/regulations/page/3/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • RescueTalk™
    5 7 now requires the performance as a litter tender in a low angle environment for a load haul or lower distance of 6 1 meters 20 feet It is now required to direct a lower in both a low angle environment 5 5 9 and a high angle environment 5 5 10 with a minimum load travel distance of 3 meters Paragraphs 5 5 12 requires the operation of a belay during a haul or lower of 10 feet in a high angle environment and 5 5 13 requires the belay of a falling load in a high angle environment Chapter 6 Rope Rescue Specialty Area The Specialty areas include knowledge and performance criteria for Level I Technicians and additional criteria for Level II Technicians Here are some of the changes and additions for level I Technicians Paragraph 6 1 4 now specifies the compound mechanical advantage operation must be directed in a high angle environment with a load haul distance of at least 6 1 meters or 20 feet This next one may be the most significant for some of us Paragraph 6 1 5 now requires a minimum rope ascent distance of 20 feet in a high angle environment The descent of a fixed rope now specifies that it is to be performed in a high angle environment with a travel distance of at least 6 1 meters Level II Rope Rescue Technicians must perform all the Level I requirements and the following additional requirements Paragraph 6 2 1 requires the completion of an assignment while suspended from a rope rescue system in a high angle environment at a height of at least 20 feet 6 2 2 requires the movement of a victim in a high angle environment at least 6 1 meters A couple of

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/regulations/page/4/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Retired and Dangerous
    many retired confined spaces and other systems in a potentially dangerous state Because of the potential dangers posed to emergency responders we wanted to share this article with our readers Cli ck to d ownload th e full article Here are some key points from the article Retired and Dangerous Out of Service Equipment Hazards by Robert Wasileski Management of Change is emphasized more during the design and operational phase of equipment life cycles but receives little emphasis when it is time to retire the equipment Older facilities have a high potential to have retired equipment that haven t had all hazards addressed and may pose serious risks Equipment that has been out of service for an extended period of time often has very little data on record stating how it was prepared to be taken out of service There are many instances of chemical reactions that can change the physical condition of the equipment over time The author provides several case studies that are truly enlightening It includes some excellent lessons for rescuers when dealing with out of service or moth balled vessels While a couple of the cases delve pretty deeply into chemical reactions it serves as a critical reminder of how important it is to check with a qualified person Remember just because a vessel has been out of service for a long period of time does not mean there are no hazards present Previous Next New Stuff Atmospheric Monitors May NOT Detect All Dangers Roco QUICK DRILL 10 Tripod Quick Drill Service Life Guidelines for Rescue Equipment NFPA Issues New Guide for Confined Spaces Gravedigger Engulfed In Cave in of Unguarded Grave Hot Topics ATMOSPHERIC HAZARDS 6 CONFINED SPACE 58 EQUIPMENT 36 FALL PROTECTION 16 FIRE FIGHTERS 1 HOW TO VIDEOS 6 INCIDENTS 27 MISCELLANEOUS 40

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/retired-and-dangerous (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • RescueTalk™
    anchored in a way that the system prevents the Authorized Worker from reaching the leading edge of a fall hazard Once active measures are employed it is critically important to work with the Authorized Persons to understand what their work activities entail to come to a solution that provides the needed protection but also considers their need for mobility If the lower echelons of the Hierarchy of Fall Protection cannot be employed a fall arrest system may be the only feasible solution A Fall Arrest Solution If the lower echelons of the Hierarchy of Fall Protection cannot be employed a fall arrest system may be the only feasible solution This is where the Qualified Competent Person s knowledge of current fall arrest systems and components really shows its value Lightweight breathable multi function fall protection equipment available today protects workers while also providing the ease of use and freedom of movement that has been missing for many years This is an important tool that the Competent Person can use to their advantage when faced with any resistance from certain Authorized Persons During the fall hazard survey consider the presence of any environmental factors that may affect the performance of the fall protection equipment or systems as well as an alternate solution specialized materials or even a reconfiguration of the structure process Environmental factors can include hot objects sharp edges slowly engulfing materials chemicals weather factors or any other environmental factor that may render the fall protection equipment ineffective Document Findings Once the entire facility has been surveyed it s time to document in writing the findings and the means to abate the identified fall hazards The Fall Hazard Survey Report becomes a part of the written fall protection program It should be reviewed periodically and whenever there is a change to legislated requirements or a change in the facility or fall protection equipment Plan for Rescue If any identified areas require the use of fall arrest systems then that triggers the need to complete a written rescue pre plan It is my opinion that rescue If any identified areas require the use of fall arrest systems then that triggers the need to complete a written rescue pre plan pre plans should also include anywhere workers are performing work at height such as elevated platforms that have been accessed by means other than elevators or stairs with the goal that the rescue plan provides a capability to get the injured or suddenly ill worker to the ground promptly Time to Train Once the Fall Hazard Survey is completed and documented it is time for the Qualified Competent Person to provide training to the Authorized Persons on the types of equipment systems selection of anchor points clearance requirements swing fall hazards and pre use inspections of their equipment Training may vary depending on the areas that Authorized Persons are assigned duties but in all cases the type of training any required re training and the criteria that would trigger the need for retraining must be documented A Valuable Tool The fall hazard survey is a valuable tool that provides a thorough assessment of the entire facility to honestly identify fall hazards and determine the most effective means to protect workers from falls Look at it as an expanded JHA that focuses specifically on areas of work at height About the Author Pat Furr is a chief instructor and technical consultant for Roco Rescue Inc Pat teaches a wide variety of technical rescue classes including Confined Space Rescue Rope Access Tower Work Rescue Fall Protection and Suspended Worker Rescue He is also involved in research and development writing articles and presenting at national conferences He is a member of the NFPA 1006 Technical Rescuer Professional Qualifications Standard read more Quick Connect Harness Buckle Safety Wednesday July 02 2014 Recently we noticed a story in a leading safety and health magazine that questions the two piece pass through buckle that is commonly used on many harnesses The author in fact referred to it as a design flaw However we consider it more a matter of improper use than a design flaw While he does identify some potential user failures we feel his terming is not quite accurate Here s why As with any life support equipment it is imperative to use the equipment in accordance with the manufacturer s instructions for use and receive the appropriate training as required The author cites instances where he has observed the mating plate of the two piece pass through buckle being improperly oriented which can lead to the buckle loosening and potentially disconnecting He also suggests that the pass through plate have some type of visual indicator to warn the user when the buckle is improperly connected Of course we re always in favor of additional safety features While this may be viewed as a matter of semantics consider the following analogy almost every outboard motorboat has one or sometimes multiple drain plugs in the transom well to provide drainage once the boat is pulled out of the water If the skipper forgets to re install the drain plugs the next time the boat is launched the transom well will fill with water which could lead to swamping So is this a design flaw or improper use From an equipment designer manufacturer s point of view the use of this terminology could be very significant With the many advances in life safety equipment we have seen harnesses and other rescue safety equipment become more convenient lighter multifunctional and overall safer than earlier generations As with many product advances and improvements there may be compromise in one area but advances in many others In this case the speed and ease of donning and doffing a Class III rescue or fall protection harness by using some type of quick connect buckle Of course the user must ensure that the buckle is used correctly The pass through buckle has been around a very long time In fact a Croll sport climbing sit harness that I bought in 1981 had this type buckle These buckles were also used in the past on the leg loops on Roco harnesses There are minor variations on the design of the buckle with some having slots to ease the pass through of the top plate while others do not have this slot There are important requirements for the safe use of these buckles which include 1 Make sure the buckle is adjusted tightly enough to ensure constant tension is applied to the top plate against the fixed plate 2 Be sure that the top plate is not inverted 3 Double check that the tail end of the webbing does not pass through the fixed plate but instead lays parallel with the anchored section of the webbing These three user points of performance are easily completed Our extensive experience with this type of buckle tells us that it s a convenient and safe buckle when used as it was designed As always carefully check and re check your gear before life loading Information from article by Robert Peterson published by OH S Online www ohsonline com read more NFPA Offering More Emergency Responder Guides for EVs Friday April 11 2014 NFPA has posted more guides to prepare firefighters and other emergency responders for incidents involving electric vehicles EVs The guides are part of NFPA s Electric Vehicle Safety Training project through which the association works with automobile manufacturers to inform the fire service and other first responders as the use of EVs increases These free first responder guides have been added to the website according to a May 5 post by Mike Hazell 2014 Honda Accord HEV Emergency Response Guide 2014 Honda Accord PHEV Emergency Response Guide First Responder s Guide for the 2014 Infiniti Q70 Hybrid First Responder s Guide for the 2014 Infiniti QX60 Hybrid First Responder s Guide for the 2014 Nissan Pathfinder Hybrid First Responder s Guide for the 2014 Nissan LEAF First Responder s Guide for the 2015 Nissan LEAF http ohsonline com articles 2014 05 06 nfpa offering more emergency responder guides for evs aspx read more Potential Safety Issues Regarding Petzl CROLL Friday March 21 2014 6 10 14 Update on Petzl CROLL Potential Safety Issues After Petzl met with their distributors regarding the Petzl CROLL B16 B16AAA issue they have provided us with the following statements Estimated devices that would potentially be exposed to this event is less than 1 in 100 000 devices produced The exposure was only documented in three known devices which were all the old style CROLL Petzl has redesigned the CROLL and no longer produces the previous generation Petzl has determined that the specific deficiency in devices could only come from either corrosion due to exposure to grain silo work or from over use of the device in the primary case it was determined that the device should have been retired at least a year prior to incident After months of testing in various conditions and states of use Petzl has not been able to replicate the condition documented with these devices in question Petzl has redesigned the CROLL to have a stainless steel cam as well as stainless steel reinforcement in the rope channel which attaches to the riveted portion of the device to ensure that there will be no replication of the events that occurred to the three older generation devices Petzl also has no warranted reason to issue a recall of this device at present or in the near future Previous Post Roco Rescue has recently learned there are potential safety issues regarding the Petzl Croll B16 B16AAA According to Petzl two different customers have informed them of the failure of the rivet head on two Petzl Croll rope clamps Although neither of these failures have led to an accident the Petzl technical team is urgently reviewing this issue with in depth investigations to understand what exactly caused these failures Petzl wants to remind consumers that when connected to a rope device the user must have a back up device or a connection to a second rope clamp as a secondary means of support They also encourage that users thoroughly inspect their CROLL B16 B16AAA to ensure that the rivet head is not missing The results of this investigation will be released no later than April 18th NOTE This notice does not affect similar products such as the CROLL B16BAA ASCENSION or PANTIN With the facts known today it currently only affects the old CROLL B16 and B16AAA that were produced in 2012 Stay connected to Roco Rescue for your latest news on this issue http www petzl com us pro safety information croll B16AAA us read more Roco QUICK DRILL 2 SCBA SAR Proficiency Tuesday February 18 2014 Proficiency in the use of PPE is critical to the safety of rescuers If you can t protect yourself you can t save others 1 Disassemble the major system components of SCBA and or SAR system and place in a room in an unorganized pile 2 Take groups or individual team members into the room and turn out the lights 3 Instruct them to put the systems together and don the units before exiting the room This forces personnel to rely on their other senses to identify the components and put the systems together The more an individual s senses are involved in training the greater the retention of key elements It is also a good emergency drill for situations that may require a better understanding of PPE at a time when vision may be restricted We want you to make the most of every rescue practice session so our Roco instructors have created Quick Drills that can be used any time you have a few minutes to practice with your team In order to have a well rounded rescue team it is so important to maximize your training time and rotate the skills practiced to keep everyone interested and involved Make sure you cover the basics as well as any techniques or special needs that may be unique to your response area As always practice practice practice And make sure you have the proper training and equipment to safely and effectively do your job read more Hazcom 2012 GHS What Rescuers Need to Know Tuesday February 11 2014 As an emergency responder it is important to have a good understanding of the dangers and precautions regarding hazardous chemicals Whether you re a member of an in plant industrial team or a municipal fire department chemical hazards are always a critical factor in emergency incidents That s why it s imperative to identify any particularly hazardous chemicals in your response area Learn as much as you can before the emergency happens The Time is Now The first requirement went into effect in December 2013 which means that workers who use hazardous chemicals must be trained to understand the new Safety Data Sheets SDS formerly known as Material Safety Data Sheets MSDS While employees must already have fluency manufacturers of these products have until December 1 2015 to switch over to the new format OSHA s HazCom 2012 standard 29 CFR 1910 1200 was revised to align with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals GHS The changes make the information easy to understand across industries countries and education levels By adopting and enforcing one standard for labels and safety data sheets that accompany chemicals employers workers health professionals and emergency responders will be better able to address the risks associated with these substances As in the past the HazCom standard imposes certain requirements on manufacturers and importers of chemicals as well as on employers whose employees can be exposed to chemical hazards in the workplace The standard applies to any chemical which is known to be present in the workplace in such a manner that employees may be exposed under normal conditions of use or in a foreseeable emergency Note This article addresses rescue teams that are subject to Federal OSHA requirements or State Plans operated in lieu of Federal requirements In states that are not OSHA State Plan states rescuers employed by a state or political subdivision of the state may not be subject to these requirements Q A for Rescue Teams Is my rescue team required to meet the HazCom standard For rescue services or in house rescue teams in certain types of industrial facilities the answer is normally yes HazCom requirements would apply because team members are working inside the facility and can obviously be exposed to chemical hazards under normal working conditions or in a foreseeable emergency For others however what appears to be a simple answer may not be that simple Is compliance required if we don t work around hazardous chemicals The simple answer would seemingly be no but that answer can be and likely is incorrect In fact the rescue team often needs to look no farther than its own cache of equipment to find the hazardous chemical The reason the applicability of HazCom to rescue teams is often overlooked is because of assumptions that we make in this case rescuers often assume that the term chemicals means what we commonly think it means But as is often the case with regulations and statutes words may be specifically defined to include or exclude certain things that common usage does not For example under the HazCom standard chemical means any substance or mixture of substances Hazardous chemical means any chemical which is classified as a physical hazard or a health hazard a simple asphyxiant combustible dust pyrophoric gas or hazard not otherwise classified As explained by OSHA in its Guidance for Hazard Determination The definition of a chemical in the HCS Hazard Communication Standard is much broader than that which is commonly used The HCS definition of chemical is any element chemical compound or mixture of elements and or compounds According to this definition virtually any product is a chemical By this definition it would mean that air is considered a chemical under the standard and OSHA includes gas under pressure in its definition of physical hazards Consequently as one example the rescue team needs to look no further than its SCBA bottles or its air source for supplied air respirators and charged airlines to find a hazardous chemical for purposes of the HazCom standard Even facilities with comprehensive HazCom programs sometimes overlook their rescue team s air sources in their programs As a rescuer it s important to get familiar with the new formatting of Safety Data Sheets SDS and the GHS symbols now Make sure to review these standards in their entirety as well as your organization s HazCom policies and procedures You and your team will be more prepared as these changes are put into place Here s a quick guide to the new GHS symbols from OSHA which will be required by June 1 2015 Note These new OSHA pictograms do not replace the diamond shaped DOT labels required for the transport of chemicals Resources National Safety Council s newsletter Safer Workplaces OSHA Fact Sheet Hazard Communication Standard Final Rule OSHA Quick Card Hazard Communication Safety Data Sheets read more New Hierarchy of Fall Protection Safety Poster from Roco Wednesday October 02 2013 Roco s new Hierarchy of Fall Protection Safety Poster provides guidance on how to protect your workers from fall hazards by illustrating a series of steps in making safer choices as job duties are approached It clearly explains the need for employers to make every attempt to abate fall hazards at their work sites by starting with the most protective level of fall protection OSHA and ANSI references are used to emphasize the need for proper training and fallen or isolated worker at height rescue pre plans when appropriate This safety poster will provide a quick reminder that oftentimes working at height is more hazardous simply because more protective steps in the hierarchy were never

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/safety/page/2/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • RescueTalk™
    then be used as both a training tool and a pre task safety checklist There are a variety of formats that can be used to create an effective and logical JHA However the JHA should become a living document that may require frequent updating as the work process tools work environment safety legislation and the workforce changes Even if these factors do not change the JHA should be reviewed periodically to ensure that it s still current and still applicable to the job or task The goal of the JHA is to identify workplace hazards and take corrective action BEFORE an incident occurs The preparation of a JHA should be a collaborative effort between safety personnel and front line workers It s often the front line worker who can provide valuable insight into the specific tasks involved as well as provide solutions to the most common hazards Of course it s always vitally important to have a safety professional intimately involved with the process to ensure that input provided works hand in hand with established company policy and any legislated safety requirements By involving front line workers they will feel like they had valuable input to the process which is very true by the way Whatever format that you choose it s important to develop your JHA in a logical easy to use manner Here are some guidelines 1 Identify the hazards This may be obvious based on any history of accidents or near misses Interview front line workers to hear their concerns Evaluate the workplace to ensure it is in compliance with legislated and consensus safety standards Brainstorm with workers to dig deeper into the subtle or overlooked hazards Break the work process down into individual steps or tasks to help uncover any obscure hazards 2 Determine the consequences of exposure to the hazard and any contributing factors or triggers It may be helpful to develop a ranking system based on a variety of factors Describe the likely outcome of exposure to the hazard Does the hazard have the potential to harm multiple employees How likely is the hazard to cause harm How quickly will exposure to the hazard cause harm Rank the hazards in terms of the most severe in order to determine which hazards must be given priority attention 3 What protective measures are available to prevent the hazard from causing harm Can the hazard be eliminated Example Eliminate fall hazards by bringing the work to the ground Can the hazard be controlled Example Install machine guards on rotating parts Finally if the hazard cannot be eliminated or controlled what personal protective equipment PPE is required to protect the worker JHA s can be very simple or very complex The goal however is to find a balance between overburdening the worker with exhaustive paperwork and a document that is so lacking in detail that it is essentially useless My experience is that the JHA should be just detailed enough to provide a succinct means to identify the hazards of the task or the various steps of the task predict the consequences of exposure to the hazard and to provide a hierarchical means to protect the worker from the hazard I like to keep the JHA simple and concise as it tends to encourage the worker to think into the situation and make for lack of a better term a real time evaluation of the hazard Remember the JHA JSA RA should be considered a living document that is updated to reflect any changes It should also be an easy to use tool that workers and management can employ to identify hazards rank the hazards in terms of their potential consequences and provide an escalating hierarchy to abate the identified hazards These documents should also be retained for a period of time because they may be useful in investigating any accidents after the fact Workers are injured every day on the job JHA s can be very useful for discovering preventing or even eliminating some hazards from your workplace At minimum the process is likely to result in fewer injuries more effective work methods and increased worker productivity What s more a simple step by step JHA can be a valuable tool in training new workers to do their jobs more safely and effectively read more What is a Competent Person Tuesday July 24 2012 OSHA s definition of a Competent Person varies slightly depending on which standard preamble to final rule directive or standard interpretation it relates to This article from NSC s Safety Health publication points out some very important considerations regarding an employer s designation of a competent person for various work activities The common theme is that no single training course in and of itself can adequately prepare an individual to fulfill the role of this position For example at a minimum a comprehensive Competent Person training course should provide 1 A high level of understanding of the types of hazards typically encountered in that area of work 2 A solid review of applicable standards relating to that type of work and 3 A thorough understanding of types of solutions to control or eliminate the hazards These are just a few of the capabilities of a Competent Person What these courses cannot provide is the job experience gained by years of work in that particular industry and the authority to implement protective measures that only the employer can grant We encourage you to keep these things in mind when you are preparing your Competent Person for the job duties that he or she will be expected to fulfill Download the pdf What is a Competent Person from the National Safety Council s Safety Health publication July 2012 read more LAFD promotes Confined Space Awareness Tuesday June 26 2012 It is our experience that the victims would be rescuers and co workers either fail to adhere to their emergency plans or simply do not have a plan in place with catastrophic results In the last year alone we have responded to three confined space rescues Battalion Chief Jack Wise of the Los Angeles Fire Department Joint Effort for Confined Space Awareness Education The California Department of Industrial Relations Division of Occupational Safety and Health Cal OSHA joined forces March 28 with the Los Angeles Fire Department to urge employers and employees to prepare properly for working in confined spaces Officials from both agencies participated in a news conference where LAFD personnel gave a confined space rescue demonstration and potential hazards were explained Cal OSHA launched a statewide confined space education and awareness campaign in February after seven confined space deaths and numerous injuries in 2011 Illustrating the variety of industries where confined spaces are common those deaths occurred at a Fortune 500 pharmaceutical facility a winery a paint manufacturing plant and a recycling center Today s event with the Los Angeles Fire Department helps raise awareness of the hazards associated with working in confined space environments and the need for employers to have an effective emergency response plan in place before a critical situation arises DIR Director Christine Baker said As a national leader in workplace safety Cal OSHA is working with labor employers and public safety officials to eliminate this type of preventable fatality in the workplace Some of the 2011 fatalities involved potential rescuers attempting to aid someone who had collapsed in a confined space These confined space deaths and serious injuries were all preventable had safety practices been in place It is even more tragic that in many cases workers attempting to rescue their co workers also fall victim said Cal OSHA Chief Ellen Widess Confined spaces can be deceptively dangerous Employers need to assess if they have such a hazard identify and mark those spaces and provide employee and supervisor training and on site rescue plans and equipment Cal OSHA has posted extensive information about confined space hazards on its website at http ohsonline com articles 2012 03 30 la fire department boosts confined space awareness aspx read more Lock Out Tag Out What Rescuers Need to Know Tuesday April 24 2012 The concept of LOTO is a great one and it works As rescuers we have to take the common industrial application and expand it to ensure that the rescue scene is safe and that we are controlling hazards at the point of contact with the victim or in a space where something has gone very wrong says Dennis O Connell Chief Instructor and Director of Training for Roco Rescue Although commonly referred to as the Lock out Tag out LOTO standard the actual title of 1910 147 is The Control of Hazardous Energy This title probably better describes it s true purpose and there s no doubt that the understanding of this concept has saved many lives and prevented countless injuries The LOTO standard covers the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment in which the energizing or start up of the machines or equipment or release of stored energy could harm employees It establishes OSHA s minimum performance requirements for the control of such hazardous energy Ref 1910 147 a 1 i The general concept of LOTO is that energy sources affecting the area in which servicing or maintenance is occurring are identified and locked in the Off position or in the case of mechanical hazards linkages are disconnected for the duration of the work Some type of lock or device is placed on the equipment by those performing the work However we ve found that if you ask different people to define LOTO you will get a variety of answers Not only will you get different definitions you ll also get varying information as to how and when LOTO is to be used and who is actually allowed to place locks or controls during the LOTO process OSHA CFR 1910 147 b has a very narrow and specific definition of who can perform lock out or tag out operations That definition does not include rescuers and actually there is good reason for that If you ask emergency responders about LOTO you ll generally find that their definition has been expanded well past the control of hazardous energy to cover most rescue operations This expanded safety mindset serves to protect both the rescuer s and the victim s from additional harm following an incident Rescuers usually define LOTO as making the scene safe or controlling and keeping machinery from moving or shifting during a rescue Unlike standard LOTO which is usually a systems approach rescuers are generally trying to control the environment near an entrapped victim As rescuers we often act outside the parameters of a LOTO procedure that may already be in place Because rescuers would best be defined under affected employees in a rescue where a LOTO procedure is in place we need to understand what OSHA CFR 1910 147 b says about authorized employees and affected employees Authorized employee A person who locks out or tags out machines or equipment in order to perform servicing or maintenance on that machine or equipment An affected employee becomes an authorized employee when that employee s duties include performing servicing or maintenance covered under this section Caveman translation A person that the employer says has the systems or mechanical knowledge and authority to safely lockout tagout a machine or space Affected employee An employee whose job requires him her to operate or use a machine or equipment on which servicing or maintenance is being performed under lock out or tag out or whose job requires him her to work in an area in which such servicing or maintenance is being performed Caveman translation I have to work in an area where LOTO is in place A nice definition can be found in 54FR36665 in the promulgation of the Control of Hazardous Energy Standard an affected employee is one who does not perform the servicing but whose responsibilities are performed in an area in which the energy control procedure is implemented and servicing operations are performed under that procedure The affected employee does not need to know how to perform lock out or tag out nor does that employee need to be trained in the detailed implementation of the energy control procedure Rather the affected employee need only be able to recognize when the energy control procedure is being implemented to identify the locks or tags being used and to understand the purpose of the procedure and the importance of not attempting to start up or use the equipment which has been locked out or tagged out There is good reason for these prohibitions Improperly performed LOTO can be just as dangerous if not more so than no LOTO at all Allowing LOTO to be performed by personnel who are not familiar with the processes and equipment to be locked out increases the chances of improper lock out The requirement that only employees actually performing the servicing and maintenance of equipment are allowed to lock out equipment is less of a concern for rescuers than may first appear and here s why Typically the person being rescued from a space that has hazardous energy sources is someone who has already performed LOTO If that person performed LOTO properly and the reason for the rescue is something other than exposure to a hazardous energy source the rescuers are not exposed because the victim obviously cannot remove his lock while he is being rescued If the victim performed the LOTO improperly and the rescuers discover the error the rescuers can then lock out the equipment as they see fit or as the rescue needs dictate without violating the standard because they are not locking out the equipment as part of the LOTO program They are locking the equipment out as part of making the area safe for rescue operations The Consequences Worker s Amputation in Turkey Shackle Leads to 318 000 Proposed Fine OSHA initiated an inspection after the July 20 2011 incident in which the employee s arm allegedly became caught in an energized turkey shackle line while the employee was working alone in a confined space Jan 24 2012 OSHA cited the company for 11 safety violations at its Wisconsin facility after a worker s arm was amputated below the shoulder while the individual was conducting cleaning activities in a confined space Proposed fines total 318 000 The company has a legal responsibility to follow established permit required confined space regulations to ensure that its employees are properly protected from known workplace hazards said Mark Hysell director of OSHA s Eau Claire Area Office Failing to ensure protection through appropriate training and adherence to OSHA regulations led to a worker losing an arm OSHA initiated an inspection after the July 20 2011 incident in which the employee s arm allegedly became caught in an energized turkey shackle line while the employee was working alone in a confined space Afterward the employee had to walk down a flight of 25 stairs and 200 feet across the production floor to get the attention of a co worker for assistance Four willful violations involve not following OSHA s permit required confined space regulations in the carbon dioxide tunnel room including failing to ensure that workers isolated the carbon dioxide gas supply line and locked out power to the shackle line prior to entering the room to conduct cleaning activities verify that electro mechanical and atmospheric hazards within the room were eliminated prior to workers entering the space test atmospheric conditions prior to allowing entry and provide an attendant during entries to the room Seven serious violations involve failing to provide fall protection provide rescue and emergency services equipment develop procedures to summon rescue and emergency services provide confined space entry procedures prepare entry permits for the confined space train employees and supervisors in entry permit procedures and ensure that the entry supervisor performed required duties This spells T R O U B L E Another Six Figure OSHA Fine for LOTO Death Dec 14 2011 OSHA announced it has cited a Missouri recycling facility for 37 safety and health violations following an inspection opened after a worker died from injuries sustained June 12 when he entered a baling machine to clear a jam and the machine became energized Proposed fines total 195 930 Twenty two serious safety violations have been filed including failing to lock out and tag out the energy sources of equipment and install adequate machine guarding fall protection exits flammable liquids fire extinguishers powered industrial trucks and welding and electrical equipment Eight serious health violations were cited as was a one repeat safety violation relating to defective powered industrial trucks that were not taken out of service The company was cited in April 2010 for a similar violation according to OSHA As rescuers we need to be aware that the LOTO standard applies to general industry operations and DOES NOT apply to the following Construction Agriculture Shipyards Marine Terminals Long shoring Installations under the exclusive control of electric utilities for the purpose of power generation transmission and distribution including related equipment for communication or metering Oil and gas well drilling and servicing Exposure to electrical hazards from work on near or with conductors or equipment in electric utilization installations which is covered by subpart S of the general industry standards Hot tap operations Continuity of service is essential Shutdown of system is impractical For some of the above operations applicable regulations provide for procedures specific to the industry which if followed should provide proven effective protection for employees However rescuers need to be aware that activities in these areas not covered by OSHA s LOTO standard could have uncontrolled energy sources As we often say if everything had been done properly we probably wouldn t be responding as rescuers In accordance with OSHA regulations a LOTO program is a documented plan for safe work practices when dealing with energy sources Prior to work commencing potential sources of hazardous energy

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/safety/page/3/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • RescueTalk™
    entanglement hazards during a rescue The use of this technique was based on testimony given to OSHA prior to the Permit Required Confined Spaces Standard 29CFR 1910 146 being published and indeed our interpretation of the intent of the standard The particular technique in question is a common practice for rescuers in which one retrieval line is used and multiple entrant rescuers are attached at different intervals with butterfly knots to reduce entanglement hazards during a rescue see example below This pending interpretation would put restraints on techniques used by rescuers when entanglement issues could be a problem It would result in the management of multiple retrieval lines in the space which could affect the effectiveness of the rescue or result in an increased danger to the entrants and or rescuers In effect this OSHA interpretation could cause an all or nothing response regarding the use of retrieval lines for rescuers and entrants This LOI would eliminate the opportunity of using an external rescue technique for certain situations Paragraph k 3 allows entrants to forgo using a retrieval line in certain situations To facilitate non entry rescue retrieval systems or methods shall be used whenever an authorized entrant enters a permit space unless the retrieval equipment would increase the overall risk of entry or would not contribute to the rescue of the entrant The technique in question is an option that falls between each individual having an individual retrieval line and having to opt out of using a retrieval line at all and it allows for external retrieval to still be an option in many cases And as most of you know from personal experience for most confined space portals only one individual can pass through at a time anyway Even with multiple retrieval lines it is still a one at a time event A shared retrieval line allows the same to take place It is Roco s position that the rescue and retrieval techniques used in rescue should be performance based to allow for the ever changing conditions and problems that are unique to rescue We also feel this pending LOI could affect the safety and ability of rescuers to adjust to these situations However until this issue is clarified Roco will not teach or use the technique of having multiple rescuers entrants attached to the same retrieval line in consecutive order using midline knots as their attachment points read more Petzl RECALL Monday July 18 2011 We have learned that Petzl America is recalling about 375 000 shock absorbing lanyards that were sold worldwide beginning in 2002 according to an announcement on July 12 from the Consumer Product Safety Commission Consumers are advised to stop using the devices immediately and contact Petzl for more information Petzl America Inc has voluntarily recalled about 375 000 Scorpio and Absorbica shock absorbing lanyards that have been sold since 2002 the U S Consumer Product Safety Commission announced July 12 Some of the lanyards are missing a safety stitch on the attachment loop which could cause the lanyard to separate from the climbing harness the posted announcement states No injuries have been reported in the U S but one fall injury in France has been Consumers should stop using them immediately CPSC notes that it is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product The lanyards were made in France All Scorpio and Absorbica lanyards manufactured before May 2011 are included Scorpio lanyards manufactured between 2002 and 2005 with model numbers L60 and L60 CK which are yellow and blue Y shaped lanyards with yellow stitching on both ends connected by a metal O ring to one end of a blue pouch containing the tear webbing shock absorber are included The pouch has a tag on it with the word PETZL in white letters and the other end of the blue pouch has a blue and yellow webbing attachment loop that connects to the climbing harness Scorpio lanyards manufactured between 2005 and 2011 are model numbers L60 2 L60 2CK L60 H and L60 WL They are red Y shaped lanyards connected by a black metal O ring to one end of a grey zippered pouch containing the tear webbing shock absorber The other end of the pouch has a black webbing attachment loop that connects to the climber s harness Absorbica lanyards included in the recall have model numbers L70150 I L70150 IM L70150 Y L70150 YM L57 L58 L58 MGO L59 and L59 MGO They have a black zippered pouch with yellow trim and the Petzl logo on the side and a tear webbing shock absorber accessible through the zippered pouch The pouch has a connector attachment on one end and a connector attachment a single lanyard or a Y shaped lanyard on the other end Authorized Petzl dealers in the United States and Canada sold them from January 2002 through May 2011 For a free inspection and replacement contact Petzl America Inc at 877 740 3826 between 8 a m and 5 p m Mountain time weekdays or visit Petzl s website read more What about rescue response for fallen workers at height Thursday July 14 2011 We recently received a question about what constitutes a prompt and capable rescue response for fallen workers at height suspended by their Personal Fall Arrest System PFAS Question My question concerns guidance on the number of rescue standby team members needed for response to worker at heights type incidents We work in a chemical plant so it s basically areas such as columns etc Answer OSHA guidance for rescue of fallen workers utilizing personal fall arrest systems PFAS is quite vague in that it calls for prompt rescue For more definitive guidance on the subject ANSI Z359 2 Para E6 1 recommends that contact with the rescue subject communication or physical contact should occur as soon as possible after the fall The recommended goal for rescue subject contact should be less than six minutes What constitutes prompt rescue can

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/safety/page/4/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • RescueTalk™
    job This analysis offers practical implications for employers who may be hesitant to invest in the more expensive interactive training programs Distance learning and electronic learning may appear to be more cost effective But our findings point to the value of investing in more hands on training to help prevent the enormous financial and human costs associated with disasters like the Upper Big Branch mine explosion said Burke Excerpt from EHS Today The Magazine for Environment Health and Safety Leaders ehstoday com Jan 28 2011 11 39 AM By Laura Walter read more Atmospheric Monitors Calibration vs Bump Testing Friday January 21 2011 The fact that we rely on these instruments to detect hazards that may be colorless odorless and very often fatal should be reason enough to motivate us to complete a very strict schedule of instrument calibration maintenance and pre use bump testing Here at Roco we re often asked for an explanation of the difference between calibration and bump testing of portable atmospheric monitors There seems to be some confusion specifically regarding bump testing Some folks believe that bump testing and calibration are the same thing Others think that bump testing is no more than allowing the monitor to run its auto span function during the initial startup sequence or by running a manual auto span in order to zero out the display if there is any deviation from the expected values To preface this explanation it is important that the user maintain and operate the monitor in accordance with the manufacturer s instructions for use There are some general guidelines that apply to all portable atmospheric monitors and some of the information in this article is drawn from an OSHA Safety and Health Information Bulletin SHIB dated 5 4 2004 titled Verification of Calibration for Direct Reading Portable Gas Monitors Considering that atmospheric hazards account for the majority of confined space fatalities it is absolutely imperative that the instruments used to detect and quantify the presence of atmospheric hazards be maintained in a reliable and ready state Environmental factors such as shifts in temperature humidity vibration and rough handling all contribute to inaccurate readings or outright failure of these instruments Therefore it is critical to perform periodic calibration and pre use bump testing to ensure the instruments are capable of providing accurate reliable information to the operator Calibration of the monitor involves using a certified calibration gas in accordance with the manufacturer s instructions This includes exposing the instrument sensors and allowing the instrument to automatically adjust the readings to coincide with the known concentration of the calibration gas Or if necessary the operator will manually adjust the readings to match the known concentration of the calibration gas In addition to using a certified calibration gas appropriate to the sensors being targeted do not ever use calibration gas that has passed its expiration date The best practice is to use calibration gas tubing flow rate regulators and adapter hoods provided by the manufacturer of the instrument The frequency of calibration should also adhere to the manufacturer s instructions for use or if more frequent the set protocol of the user s company or facility Once the monitor has been calibrated it is important to maintain a written record of the results including adjustments for calibration drift excessive maintenance repairs or if an instrument is prone to inaccurate readings Each day prior to use the operator should verify the instrument s accuracy This can be done by completing a full calibration or running a bump test also known as a functional test To perform a bump test use the same calibration gas and equipment used during the full calibration and expose the instrument to the calibration gas If the readings displayed are in an acceptable range compared to the concentrations of the calibration gas then that is verification of instrument accuracy If the values are not within an acceptable range then a full calibration must be performed and repairs replacement completed as necessary Modern electro mechanical direct reading atmospheric monitors have come a long way in recent years in terms of reliability accuracy and ease of use But they are still relatively fragile instruments that need to be handled and maintained with a high degree of care The fact that we rely on these instruments to detect hazards that may be colorless odorless and very often fatal should be reason enough to motivate us to complete a very strict schedule of instrument calibration maintenance and pre use bump testing For more information on this subject please refer to the November 20 2002 ISEA position Statement Verification of Calibration for Direct Reading Portable Gas Monitors Used In Confined Spaces Are Your Gas Monitors Just expensive Paperweights by Joe Sprately and James MacNeal s article as it appears in the October 2006 issue of Occupational Safety and Health magazine read more What does it mean when my atmospheric monitor gives negative or minus readings Thursday December 02 2010 At some point most atmospheric monitors will display a negative or minus reading for a flammable gas or toxic contaminant First of all it is not actually possible for an atmosphere to contain a negative amount of a substance These negative readings usually result from improper use of the monitor Most monitors will Field Zero or Fresh Air Calibrate its sensors when powered on Because of this it is very important to power on the unit in a clean fresh air environment away from confined spaces running equipment or other possible contaminants Otherwise the monitor may falsely calibrate based on the contaminant that is present For example a monitor that is powered on in an atmosphere that contains 10 ppm of a contaminant and then moved to fresh air may display a reading of minus 10 ppm Even more troublesome if that same monitor is then brought to a confined space that actually contains 25 ppm of the contaminant it may display a reading of only 15 ppm As you can see this could easily lead to the improper selection of PPE for the entrant and result in a confined space emergency As always it is very important to consult with the manufacturer of your particular atmospheric monitor in order to determine how to use it properly Don t take any chances with this critical part of preparing for confined space entry or rescue operations read more Is there a regulation requiring rescuers to use respiratory protection that is one level higher than that required for the entrants Thursday November 18 2010 To our knowledge there is no regulatory requirement However we ve heard this before and have used it as well when stressing the importance of proper PPE for rescuers particularly when IDLH atmospheres may be involved Here s our thinking if the entrant s PPE did not provide adequate protection and he or she is now requiring rescue assistance then using their same level of protection isn t going to protect you either What triggers the use of a greater level of protection This comes from the rescuer s assessment of the hazards including the use of an independent atmospheric monitor from that used by the entrant s That s why it s so important for the rescue team to provide their own atmospheric monitoring equipment It also illustrates why written rescue preplans are so important you need to preplan what equipment and techniques will be required well in advance of an emergency It s critical the PPE selected must be adequate to protect the rescuers When preparing rescue preplans you must also take into consideration any unusual hazards or circumstances that may arise from any work being done inside or near the space For example special cleaning solvents might be used or other hazards may be introduced into the space by the workers Referencing and understanding the MSDS as well as listening to what your monitor is telling you are key factors in PPE determination OSHA does mention however if the atmospheric condition is unknown then it should be considered IDLH and the use of positive pressure SCBA SAR must be used This will protect you from low O2 levels and other inhalation dangers however you must also consider LEL LFL levels Other factors include non atmospheric conditions as well For example have you considered skin absorption hazards and what precautions must be taken So the bottom line the decision to go with breathing air for rescuers can be determined from your hazard assessment or in some cases by company policy and even required by OSHA when there s an unknown atmosphere involved Remember it s much better to be safe than sorry read more Is a tailboard briefing enough prior to a confined space entry Monday November 08 2010 We had this question from a reader and wanted to post for all to read Would a proper tailboard briefing conducted before a confined space entry be sufficient for identifying hazards that may be encountered by the entrants or the rescue team It s true that a tailboard briefing should be an integral part of the larger overall preplanning for a confined space entry However well in advance of the entry a detailed hazard analysis of the space should be performed A hazard analysis is used to identify the types of hazards lock out tag out needs PPE required for entry method of entry and important rescue considerations In fact OSHA requires these written assessments to be completed prior to an entry being made and the confined space permit acts as a secondary written assessment performed at the time of the entry Here are some OSHA references concerning this topic 1910 146 c 5 ii H The employer shall verify that the space is safe for entry and that the pre entry measures required by paragraph c 5 ii of this section have been taken through a written certification that contains the date the location of the space and the signature of the person providing the certification The certification shall be made before entry and shall be made available to each employee entering the space or to that employee s authorized representative 1910 146 d 2 Identify and evaluate the hazards of permit spaces before employees enter them 1910 146 d 3 Develop and implement the means procedures and practices necessary for safe permit space entry operations The tailboard briefing should be used to confirm or reinforce the information already gathered in the hazard analysis Because it deals with an individual space at the time of entry the tailboard briefing is also a very useful tool in finding out if conditions have changed since the hazard analysis was completed So the bottom line having a detailed hazard analysis for each space that includes a detailed rescue preplan allows a rescue team to review and prepare for potential problems well in advance Reviewing this information at a tailboard briefing just prior to the entry helps to remind everyone of the possible hazards the proper precautions and the potential solutions should an emergency occur read more Are safety lines required in an actual rescue Friday September 24 2010 This question was submitted by Thomas Vitti from the Chevron Fire Dept in Salt Lake City Utah In the event of an actual rescue is a safety line necessary Good question the answer is YES and NO This question falls into somewhat of a gray area Much depends on what type of rescue you re doing who the safety line is for and most importantly the function of the safety line Here we ve put together our ideas in relation to OSHA regulations interpretations and our own rescue experience Then of course there s our motto There s a safe way and a SAFER way which we always keep in mind Most of the time the answer for rescuers is YES Again one of the most important questions in determining the answer is the function of the safety line during the particular rescue In most instances the safety line functions as fall protection and OSHA requires that all employees be protected from fall hazards That includes employees performing rescue As a rescuer it is expected that you would be capable of designing a rescue system that maintains two points of contact and meets all fall protection requirements For example if you the rescuer are being lowered into or out of a space you would be on a single system one point of contact and will therefore need another point of contact safety line to act as your second point of contact and fall protection In this instance your safety line functions as your fall protection Once you ve been lowered to the bottom of a confined space and you move away from the portal your safety line then functions as an external retrieval line However if it will not contribute to your rescue or will make it more hazardous according to OSHA 1910 146 the line is not necessary Is a safety line required for the person being rescued i e the victim For the most part YES it should be part of the preplan for that particular type of rescue While OSHA requires that all employees be protected from fall hazards if the patient s condition is critical heart attack suspended unconscious IDLH atmosphere etc and set up time for the safety line would cause a delay in getting the proper medical treatment the rescue team may be justified in not using a safety line for the victim patient Additionally certain circumstances may not require the application of a safety line system for the victim For instance if an employee falls and is suspended by a fall arrest system you don t need to add another safety line to do the rescue Roco s recommendation YES a safety line is always required for a rescuer even in a confined space where it can also be used for communication purposes Safety lines for the victim patient are also highly recommended when the victim will be suspended But we also realize that there may be life or death circumstances when quickness of rescue is more important than the added precaution of using a safety line on the patient Because Fed OSHA does not specifically address this issue in certain circumstances it may be justifiable not to do so It is understood that there are unexpected emergency events with many possible mitigating factors to deal with making it impossible to regulate every potential scenario So this leaves some room for judgment based on the circumstances But if your justification is that you did not have sufficiently trained personnel or sufficient equipment to employ a safety line fall protection system OSHA is likely to conclude that you were not properly prepared to perform rescue for your particular work environment OSHA does not dictate how a rescue is to be performed OSHA s only performance standard for a rescue team is that they are capable of performing rescues in a safe efficient and timely manner That s why we emphasize preplanning preparing and practicing for the most likely scenarios at your site Rescue preplans allow teams to plan for safe effective rescue systems that would include fall protection as part of the plan in fact the safety line system could be pre rigged bagged and ready to go The importance of preplanning for rescue is also addressed in OSHA 1910 146 k 1 v which refers to providing the rescue team or service selected with access to all permit spaces from which rescue may be necessary so that the rescue service can develop appropriate rescue plans and practice rescue operations Of course representative spaces are also acceptable As a final note where OSHA does not have a specific regulation that addresses a particular hazard or means of protection it may cite an employer for violating the General Duty clause which requires an employer to provide a workplace free of recognized hazards In citing under the General Duty clause OSHA can reference national consensus standards such as ANSI and NFPA to establish a recognized hazard and acceptable means of protection These consensus standards can also be invaluable resources for compliance guidance Note It is always important to follow your company s policies and procedures concerning emergency response operations as well as all relevant standards and regulations for your industry read more Confined Space Attendants More than just a Hole Watch Wednesday August 04 2010 Whenever I go out into the field for a rescue stand by job I always take note of the attendant I will always talk to them in order to try and gauge this person s level of knowledge about confined spaces in general as well as the particular entry that is being made Unfortunately more often than not I discover that this worker has very little experience or very little training in confined spaces Most of these workers tend to be the low man on the work crew and seem to just be thrown in to that position A lot of the facilities and contractors seem to have the attitude that anyone can be the hole watch This can be the major ingredient in a recipe for disaster When OSHA created the Confined Space Regulation 29 CFR 1910 146 they included a list of the roles and responsibilities of the Entrant Attendant and Entry Supervisor A cursory glance at the responsibilities of the attendant paints a picture of someone who is acutely tied to the overall safety of the operation These are some of the highlights of the attendant s duties Know the hazards that may be faced during the entry as well as the effects of those hazards Monitor conditions inside and outside of the space Call for the evacuation of the space in the event of an emergency or the detection of a prohibited condition When you look closely at these duties you ll see that this is a lot more

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/safety/page/5/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive



  •