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  • RescueTalk™
    the occupants and firefighters and is directly related to property damage said Jason Averill a principal investigator on the study who leads NIST s Engineered Fire Safety Group within its Building and Fire Research Laboratory Reprinted from Occupational Health Safety read more What s New with NFPA 1006 Monday May 03 2010 Some subtle and not so subtle changes to NFPA 1006 are included in the most current edition The 2008 edition is now titled Standard for Technical Rescuer Professional Qualifications Today we ll address some of the changes that have been made to Chapter 4 and Chapter 5 Job Performance Requirements which some folks call core requirements We will also cover some of the changes to the Rope Rescue and Confined Space Rescue specialty areas Chapter 4 Technical Rescuer As in the past a technical rescuer must perform all of the job performance requirements of chapter 5 and at least one of the technician levels of at least one specialty area This is analogous to the core plus one concept of previous additions The change has to do with the new technician levels For each specialty area there are two levels of qualification Level I An individual who can identify hazards use equipment and can apply limited techniques as identified in this standard Level II An individual who can identify hazards use equipment and can apply advanced techniques as identified in this standard As an example an individual could be a level II technician for Confined Space Rescue and a Level I technician for Cave Rescue Chapter 5 Job Performance Requirements A recurring theme first shows up in chapter 5 and it has to do with including specific criteria in terms of distance traveled or minimum height of certain operations For example paragraph 5 5 5 and 5 5 6 have to do with directing a mechanical advantage team in the movement of a load The minimum distance of load travel is 3 meters or 10 feet for those of us who struggle with metric conversion In addition it is required to perform this in both a low angle 5 5 5 and high angle 5 5 6 environment Paragraph 5 5 7 now requires the performance as a litter tender in a low angle environment for a load haul or lower distance of 6 1 meters 20 feet It is now required to direct a lower in both a low angle environment 5 5 9 and a high angle environment 5 5 10 with a minimum load travel distance of 3 meters Paragraphs 5 5 12 requires the operation of a belay during a haul or lower of 10 feet in a high angle environment and 5 5 13 requires the belay of a falling load in a high angle environment Chapter 6 Rope Rescue Specialty Area The Specialty areas include knowledge and performance criteria for Level I Technicians and additional criteria for Level II Technicians Here are some of the changes and additions for level I Technicians

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/safety/page/6/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Trench Collapse Fatality: Las Vegas, NM
    protect yourself And if you re involved with the project from the beginning preplan each job with the utmost precaution According to OSHA excavation and trenching are among the most hazardous construction operations This type work presents serious hazards to all workers involved Cave ins pose the greatest risk and are much more likely than other excavation related accidents to result in worker fatalities Other potential hazards include falls falling loads hazardous atmospheres and incidents involving mobile equipment The regulation that covers requirements for excavation and trenching operations is OSHA 1926 650 What s the difference between an excavation and a trench OSHA defines an excavation as any man made cut cavity trench or depression in the earth s surface formed by earth removal This can include excavations for anything from cellars to highways A trench is defined as a narrow underground excavation that is deeper than it is wide and no wider than 15 feet 4 5 meters Why is it important to preplan the excavation work No matter how many trenching shoring and back filling jobs you have done in the past it is important to approach each new job with the utmost care and preparation Many on the job accidents result directly from inadequate initial planning Waiting until after the work has started to correct mistakes in shoring or sloping slows down the operation adds to the cost and increases the possibility of a cave in or other excavation failure A big part of being safe is being prepared Knowing as much as possible about the job or work site and the materials or equipment needed is a best practice Here are a few things OSHA recommends you consider about the site 1 Traffic 2 Proximity and physical conditions of nearby structures 3 Soil 4 Surface and

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/trench_collapse_fatality_las_vegas-_nm (2016-02-15)
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  • Toddler Killed in Arkansas Building Collapse
    precautions along with simple practical techniques using tools readily available can make a big difference in the first few minutes of a building collapse emergency Reported by Washington Post National MORRILTON Ark As residents and rescue workers arrived at the scene of a building collapse in central Arkansas one woman trapped under a beam screamed out for her baby and rescuers pulled a toddler s body from the rubble of a century old building Firefighters used everything from backhoes to their bare hands to sift through the wreckage of the two story brick building hours after 2 year old Alissa Jones body was found in the rubble and authorities had accounted for everyone else inside At least six other people were injured when the building suddenly collapsed Monday Brian Matthews was at his auto detailing shop nearby when he heard the building crumble When he looked up there was nothing but smoke he said He was among those who rushed over and heard a woman screaming My baby is still inside He and other men pulled bricks and wood off the woman exposing her injured legs as she continued to cry out Matthews said the girl showed no signs of life when would be rescuers found her in the rubble of a bridal boutique and cosmetic store Coroner Richard Neal later said the child was dead The relationship between the woman and the toddler was not immediately clear Investigators including the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration were trying to determine whether ongoing construction at the bridal shop was to blame We don t know how or why they collapsed said Brandon Baker the director of emergency management in Conway County We just know it was fast One wall inside the building that remains standing is still a cause for concern Mayor Stewart Nelson said Tuesday morning I m standing here looking at it Nelson said It s been creaking and groaning all night We re just waiting for that wall to collapse too He said Monday that people had noticed similar noises at the building in recent days Of the 10 people inside the building Baker said one died and four others were injured Neal said one of the dead girl s relatives was among the injured A local hospital said six people were treated Christy Hockaday chief executive of St Vincent Morrilton said five of the six were released and the remaining person was in good condition Morrilton police resumed looking for any possible victims Tuesday although they believed everyone was accounted for Workers inserted tiny cameras into crevices between crumbled bricks to make sure no one else was trapped The collapsed building on a corner in the heart of downtown forced officials to shut down a portion of the town s business district Broken bricks and twisted metal slumped over the street corner where the building once stood A broken clothes rack showed off a few colorful dresses mostly untouched by the barrage of debris Down the

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/toddler-killed-in-arkansas-building-collapse (2016-02-15)
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  • Physical Training Prepares Miners for Rescue
    sing and jog at the same time Despite numerous challenges to training the men via videoconference from above Romagnoli said the men were enthusiastic about the new routines One of the advantages we have is these guys are strong they are accustomed to working their arms and upper body This is not a sedentary population we are dealing with they will respond quickly While rescue procedures call for the men to spend just 20 minutes inside the rescue cage Romagnoli is preparing the men to stand immobile for as long as an hour Ideally we leave them with an ample margin of error he said Over the weekend Chilean navy engineers delivered the first of three rescue capsules to the mine to start testing the custom built cagelike structure The Phoenix painted with the colors of the Chilean flag weighs just under 1 012 pounds and is equipped with WiFi communications and three oxygen tanks that allow the men to breathe for as long as 90 minutes The capsule also has two emergency exits for use if the tube becomes wedged in the rescue shaft In a worst case scenario the miner will be able to open the floor of the capsule and lower himself back into the depths of the mine Once the rescue tunnel is complete two people a miner and a paramedic with rescue training will first be lowered into the hole Jaime Manalich Chile s health minister said as he outlined what he described as a 500 person rescue operation Once lowered into the hole the paramedic will administer medications and intravenous hydration to the men Sedatives will be used if necessary to calm the men before the ride to the surface Using health charts and interviews the rescue coordinators are classifying the miners into three

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/physical-training-prepares-miners-for-rescue (2016-02-15)
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  • Can I Use a Crane as Part of my Rescue Plan?
    crane to move rescuers and rescue victims without completing rescue plans with very clear justification would not be in compliance with OSHA regulations It must be demonstrated that the use of a crane was the only feasible means to complete the rescue while not increasing the risk compared to other means Even then there is the potential for an OSHA Compliance Officer to determine that there were indeed other feasible and safer means In other words using a crane as part of a rescue plan must have rock solid written justification demonstrating that it is the safest feasible means to provide rescue capability On the practical side however the use of cranes as stationary temporary high point anchors can be a tremendous asset to rescuers It may also be part of a rescue plan for a confined space or a top entry fan plenum for example The use of stationary high point pulleys can allow rescuers to run their systems from the ground It can also provide the headroom to clear rescuers and packaged patients from the space or an elevated edge Of course security of the attachment of the system to the crane and the ability to lock out any potential movement are a critical part of the preplanning process Taking it a step further where some movement of the crane may be required to do the rescue extreme caution must be taken It may require advanced rigging techniques in order to prevent movement of the crane from putting undo stress on the rescue system and its components Rescuers must also evaluate if the movement would unintentionally take in or add slack to the rescue system which could place the patient in harm s way Consider this movement of a crane can take place on multiple planes left right boom up down boom in out and cable up down If movement must take place rescuers must evaluate how it might affect the operation of the rescue system Of course one of the most important considerations in using any type of mechanical device is its strength and ability or inability to feel the load If the load becomes hung up while movement is underway serious injury to the victim or overpowering of system components can happen almost instantly No matter how much experience a crane operator has when dealing with human loads there s no way he can feel if the load becomes entangled and most likely he will not be able to stop before injury or damage occurs Think of it this way just as rescuers limit the number of haul team members so they can feel the load that ability is lost when energized devices are used to do the work Applicable OSHA standards only restrict the movement of personnel with a crane The same practical safety considerations that led OSHA to enact these standards should apply to decisions involving the use of cranes for rescue For rescuers a crane is just another tool in the toolbox one

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/can-i-use-a-crane-as-part-of-my-rescue-plan (2016-02-15)
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  • Are You Sure You Don't Need On-Air Rescue Practice?
    at this incident from a few years back The way this confined space fatality occurred and the possibility of it happening is a real eye opener It emphasizes the critical importance for considering all possible or potential hazards associated with confined space entry and rescue Folks what I m trying to say here is as rescuers we need to be prepared for the worst case scenario as well as the unexpected This is especially true when it comes to confined spaces When I hear We don t need on air practice because we don t allow IDLH entries at our facility Well neither did these guys Fatal Activation of CO2 Fire Protection System in Confined Space Sheffield Forgemasters was ordered to pay heavy fines and costs for safety failings that led to an employee dying of carbon dioxide poisoning after the cellar he was working in filled with the deadly gas A worker was found unconscious at the South Yorkshire foundry after a confined underground area swiftly flooded with the fire extinguishing mist Four of his co workers desperately tried to reach him but were themselves almost overcome by the fast acting gas The worker who had three grown up sons was pronounced dead on arrival at the hospital after the incident at the firm s plant on 30 May 2008 The Health and Safety Executive HSE investigated and prosecuted the company for serious safety failings On December 19th 2013 Sheffield Crown Court heard that on the morning of the incident the worker had carried out part of the cable cutting task in an electrical drawpit and then went to carry out the rest of the job in the switchroom cellar which was only accessible by lifting a manhole cover and dropping down a ladder Once underground at the electrical drawpit the worker used a petrol driven saw to cut through redundant 33 000 volt cables At some point he moved from there to the nearby switchroom cellar with the saw Later that morning colleagues heard the carbon dioxide CO2 warning alarms sounding from the cellar A supervisor and other workmates rushed to help with several of them trying to get down the ladder from the manhole to rescue the worker from the cellar s confines However all attempts were defeated as each worker struggled to breathe and remain conscious when exposed to the debilitating concentrated carbon dioxide The victim had to be brought to the surface later using slings HSE found that use of the petrol driven saw in the switchroom cellar had likely activated a smoke sensor and prompted the release of the carbon dioxide from the fire extinguishing system The court was told Sheffield Forgemasters had failed to provide any rescue equipment for either the cellar or the drawpit Other issues identified included a lack of a risk assessment by the firm for the cable cutting task and failing to provide a safe system of work in either underground location In addition there was no secure way

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/are-you-sure-you-dont-need-on-air-rescue-practice (2016-02-15)
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  • RescueTalk™
    not included in this section of the standard 1910 146 k 3 i Roco then wrote a letter to OSHA requesting clarification about the forthcoming LOI A portion of our letter stated that This pending interpretation is different from our understanding of what s required by the regulation While this particular technique is one option of providing external retrieval there are other alternatives currently being used by rescuers One of the techniques being used is a single retrieval line for multiple entrant rescuers The first rescuer to enter the space is attached to the retrieval line via an end of line Figure 8 on a Bight Any subsequent rescuers enter the space attached to the same retrieval line using mid line Butterfly knots In our opinion this satisfies the intent of the regulation in that each entrant is attached to a retrieval line However in the case of multiple entrants requiring individual lines as mentioned in the proposed LOI may represent an entanglement hazard This in effect may cause entrants to opt out of using retrieval lines due to potential entanglement hazards which is allowed by the standard if entanglement hazards are a concern So in our opinion this effort to bring more clarity to the issue may further complicate the matter Again we believe the single retrieval line method described above is one way to rescue entrants while satisfying the intent of the standard at the same time More background is available by reading our original story Fast forward back to July 2012 the demonstration lasted about four hours During this time Roco demonstrated numerous retrieval line techniques as well as the pros and cons for each system There was a great deal of discussion back and forth on how this pending letter of interpretation could affect rescuers and entrants and their ability to perform their jobs safely and efficiently We would like to thank OSHA for allowing us to offer our feedback concerning this topic We also want to say a special thanks to the Baltimore Fire Department for allowing us to use their training facilities We don t know when a final LOI will be issued but we will keep you posted read more SKED Procedural Change with Cobra Replacement Buckles Thursday May 24 2012 Here at Roco we have recently discovered a minor issue when the SKED stretcher is updated with Cobra buckles The Cobra buckle replacement system is attached by girth hitching the components into the grommets The girth hitch takes up more room in the grommets than the sewn loop that was previously used This makes it more difficult to pass the vertical bridle rope through the grommet holes that we re accustomed to using Skedco was contacted and has approved the following alternative method see photo After tying a square knot at the bottom of the SKED bring the tail ends of the rope back up and pass them through the bottom grommet hole of the handles before tying the second square knot Note Handle holes may be used with the old style buckle system read more Mechanical Advantage Systems How Strong Friday May 11 2012 In this and upcoming articles we want to give you an idea of the actual forces that are put on M A systems versus theoretical forces that you may read about What s the difference With theoretical we re referring to the amount of force that is supposed to be produced while the actual is just that the actual amount of force that is produced when the system is built and operated For example calculating the force if you built a 3 1 mechanical advantage on paper theoretically versus physically building the system With the actual system you would have to consider the friction loss created by the system components so the actual M A may be 2 5 1 with the same 3 1 system We decided to do some informal testing out at the Roco Training Center with the assistance of some of our students The systems were tested as they are generally used in the field The numbers shown are an average of the tests we conducted The average is from a random sample of 10 to 20 tests using the same equipment and set up We used a Dillon 25 000 lbf dynamometer with an error factor of 20 lbf Note These test numbers are designed as a reference only and should not be used as exact force data Test 1 Straight line Pull Student Set up Students were asked to pull on the line in a horizontal plane and exhibit as much force as they could without tugging jerking the line They were then asked to maintain that tension and tug jerk the line Equipment Set up 12 ft of 1 2 PMI rope tied with a Figure 8 knot and attached to the dynamometer by two 2 ft pieces of 1 basket looped webbing and two auto locking steel carabiners to a rigid anchor with another basket looped webbing loop What the Numbers Mean First of all they will serve as a baseline for future informal tests when comparing different types of M A systems We will evaluate the efficiency of the different systems as well as the possible forces that are put on the components of the system when using typical rescue haul teams Grasping at Ropes One interesting fact that we can take away from these numbers is that even though the vast majority of the persons involved in the testing random rescue students weighedin excess of 160 lbs they were only able to generate a maximum of 160 pounds of force on the 1 2 inch rope This is largely due to the student s ability to grasp and hold onto the 1 2 line before it pulled through their hands Similar tests using 9mm rope had an average force of 120 lbf for a single person pull There was only a slight difference of about 2 lbf between the 1 2 inch rope and the 9mm rope We had anticipated a greater disparity as the rope diameter decreased and the ability to grasp the smaller line was lessened However we did observe that with the smaller diameter rope haulers had a tendency to twist their hands making a 90 degree turn in the rope This added additional friction making it possible to put more force on the line before it slipped Stay tuned as we continue this informal real world testing in future blog posts It should be interesting to see how the forces translate from 1 2 3 and 4 person Haul Teams when using these various Mechanical Advantage systems read more Roco Techniques Right at your Fingertips Wednesday October 05 2011 The newly revised Roco Pocket Guide features fifty eight pages of color illustrations of the actual techniques and systems taught in our classes Made from a synthetic paper impervious to moisture this pocket sized field guide will hold up in the most unfavorable environments The newly revised Roco Pocket Guide features fifty eight pages of color illustrations of the actual techniques and systems taught in our classes Made from a synthetic paper impervious to moisture this pocket sized field guide will hold up in the most unfavorable environments Tabbed sections offer a quick reference in the following topics knot tying techniques rope care tips anchoring belaying patient packaging litter rigging lowering systems and a confined space types chart Roco s New Pocket Guide is the perfect reference when working in the field Retail price 35 00 You can purchase a copy of Roco s NEW Pocket Guide Model R910C for 35 00 by visiting our online shop or order by phone at 800 647 7626 Register to WIN a Roco Pocket Guide read more Proper Training Required Why it s so important Monday August 08 2011 In this article we want to provide some background on our experiences with users of rescue equipment and why we feel proper training is so important In the past 30 years we ve had the honor of having thousands of students attend our rescue training classes Attitudes toward the statement Do not use this equipment without proper training runs the gamut It goes from I never read the instructions to I read understand and follow them to the T As our students come in all shapes sizes experience levels attitudes and needs this is understandable However there s one common denominator they have come to us for training and that s our critical role In many cases an entire rescue team will show up for training with all their rescue gear in tow They will then tell us that they have never received training on nor really understand the proper use of their equipment So it really boils down to this what are the advantages of receiving training on the proper use of the equipment Obviously the primary concern is safety safety of the users and the rescue subjects Another critical point includes using the equipment contrary to the manufacturer s instructions which can lead to questions of liability While some manufacturers provide complete and easy to understand instructions for use of their equipment others provide just enough to get the box open Note While it s not an NFPA 1983 requirement most manufacturers do include a statement concerning proper training prior to use In fact there is no NFPA requirement that instructions for use be provided by the manufacturer Here are some important questions to consider What are the working load limitations of the item If the gear is used for both planned work activities and for rescue activities the maximum working loads may be different depending on the application In some cases additional rigging configurations are required for exceptional uses and heavy loads What are the effects of using the equipment in a variety of configurations Are there load multipliers involved in certain configurations that need to be addressed What are the effects of eccentric loads on the equipment Many equipment items are to be used in static load applications only and can be damaged or catastrophically fail if subjected to dynamic loads Oftentimes these issues are not addressed in the user manual but may be a need to know and understand consideration Also using the item as part of a system may not be covered in the user manual It s important to understand this so that the equipment can be used to its full advantage and to make sure it s not subjected to unacceptable loads when used in a system Many times the user manual provides bare bones instructions for use and doesn t cover any instruction for use as part of a system Nor does it cover the precautions for use as part of a system While it seems that more and more manufacturers are moving towards pre built engineered systems it s not always feasible or advantageous to use a pre built system However it is very common to use multiple bits of hardware software and rope to create a build as you go system that s appropriate for the job Without receiving the proper training on the compatibility of components used in a system the user may be creating an unsafe condition or missing out on an opportunity for a more efficient solution Or miss out on the expanded use of equipment they already have in their cache In addition more rescue gear is being designed to perform multiple functions It s not uncommon for us to hear students say something like Wow I didn t know it could do that too Items that are put into the rescue equipment cache with the belief that it is designed to perform one function only may be another opportunity lost Needless to say we are big advocates of multifunction equipment This provides for a smaller lighter and quite possibly less expensive rescue equipment cache It also provides the ability to adapt a given rescue plan and shift the role of the equipment from one function to another Typically there are opportunities to use equipment in a manner that it can be quickly converted from one function to another as part of the plan Without the proper training this may not be obvious by simply reading the user manual Finally how clear is the user manual in explaining criteria for inspection and removal from service Depending on what s provided by the manufacturer i e text and graphics a piece of equipment may require additional training for the proper inspection points and reasons for taking it out of service With that said we hope it s perfectly clear that the statement proper training is required prior to use should be taken to heart It always saddens us to hear of incidents where rescuers are hurt or injured while training for or in the performance of their duties especially when the root cause is listed as inadequate training Hopefully you are seeking quality training from a reputable training institution on the proper use of your equipment Not just to satisfy a liability issue but to keep your rescuers safe It also allows them to understand and take full advantage of the equipment in their rescue cache keeping it safe simple and effective read more What s the talk about individual retrieval lines Wednesday July 20 2011 Because it is important to keep our readers and students updated we wanted to share the following information with you Please note that this issue is not resolved as of this time and we have a letter submitted to OSHA for clarification However we wanted to keep you in the loop so that you can make better decisions when it comes to your rescue preplanning and operations It has recently come to our attention that there is a pending OSHA Letter of Interpretation LOI regarding the requirement for an individual retrieval line for each entrant This pending interpretation is different from our understanding of what s required by the regulation 1910 146 While this particular technique is one option of providing external retrieval there are other alternatives currently being used by rescuers As mentioned above Roco has submitted a detailed letter to OSHA for a clarification stating our position that the use of individual lines for entrants in all cases is problematic for a number of reasons Although OSHA s response in its letter of interpretation is ambiguous as to its applicability to entry rescue operations in our commitment to follow the intent of all OSHA standards Roco is assuming that OSHA s response was intended to apply to all entries including rescue entries Therefore we will teach and use individual lines for the time being until we get further clarification from OSHA Question to OSHA In a request for clarification a gentleman from Maryland had asked this question Does OSHA 1910 146 k 3 require that each individual entrant including workers and or rescuers entering into a confined space be provided with an independent retrieval line or can more than one entrant be connected to a single retrieval line OSHA s Response OSHA s response in the LOI states OSHA 1910 146 k 3 i requires that each authorized entrant into a permit required confined space must have a chest or full body harness attached to their individual retrieval line or life line to ensure immediate rescue of the entrant Roco Note It is important to note that individual retrieval line is not used in k 3 i it simply refers to a retrieval line The standard states Each authorized entrant shall use a chest or full body harness with a retrieval line attached at the center of the entrant s back near shoulder level above the entrant s head or at another point Additional Roco Comments First of all OSHA s Permit Required Confined Spaces Standard is for the most part a performance based standard meaning that it generally provides a result that is to be met but leaves the manner by which that result is to be obtained to the judgment of the employer This is particularly true of the rescue and retrieval requirements as the specific circumstances and conditions of each entry or rescue will dictate what equipment and techniques may be required However this pending Letter of Interpretation LOI regarding the use of retrieval lines in Confined Spaces crosses over into the area of specific equipment and techniques that must be used Consistent with the performance based nature of the standard Roco has taught for years a technique that uses a single retrieval line for multiple entrants as an option to reduce line entanglement hazards during a rescue The use of this technique was based on testimony given to OSHA prior to the Permit Required Confined Spaces Standard 29CFR 1910 146 being published and indeed our interpretation of the intent of the standard The particular technique in question is a common practice for rescuers in which one retrieval line is used and multiple entrant rescuers are attached at different intervals with butterfly knots to reduce entanglement hazards during a rescue see example below This pending interpretation would put restraints on techniques used by rescuers when entanglement issues could be a problem It would result in the management of multiple retrieval lines in the space which could affect the effectiveness of the rescue or result in an increased danger to the entrants and or rescuers In effect this OSHA interpretation could cause an all or nothing response regarding the use of retrieval lines for rescuers and entrants This LOI would eliminate the opportunity of using an external rescue technique for certain situations Paragraph k 3 allows entrants to forgo using a retrieval line in certain situations To facilitate non entry rescue retrieval systems or methods shall be used whenever an authorized entrant enters a permit space unless the retrieval equipment would increase the overall risk of entry or would not contribute to the rescue

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/techniques/page/2/ (2016-02-15)
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  • RescueTalk™
    technical rescue since 1981 Pat is a Chief Instructor Technical Consultant for Roco and currently resides in Albuquerque New Mexico He has also been an On Site Safety Services Team Leader for Roco at a major semiconductor company in New Mexico for the past ten years As a Chief Instructor Pat teaches Confined Space Rescue Rope Access Tower Work Rescue and Fall Protection programs across North America Prior to Roco he served 20 years in the U S Air Force as a Pararescueman PJ His background includes eight years as a member of the 71st Pararescue team in Anchorage Alaska where he specialized in mountain and glacier rescue Pat was a team leader of the 1986 and 1988 PJ teams that summited Mt McKinley and augmented the National Park Service mountain rescue team He also spent two tours of duty in Iceland where he put in multiple first ascent ice routes read more To Pre rig or not to Pre rig Monday September 27 2010 We received an interesting question about pre rigged systems from one of our subscribers The TechPanel had some helpful comments to share so we have re posted the info here It s a great topic Here are some things to consider about leaving systems pre rigged First of all whether to pre rig systems or not depends a lot on the types of rescues you will be doing Pre rigged systems make sense for most industrial and municipal teams who have rope equipment designated specifically for rescues However it makes less sense for climbers and wilderness personnel who will be using the same equipment for multiple uses and putting systems together based on a specific need This also reduces the amount and weight of equipment they must carry which is a big concern However it also requires a high level of proficiency in a variety of systems in order to build systems safely and in a timely manner Next let s clarify what we mean by pre rigged systems Plug n Play These are systems that come pre built and seem to require little training to operate These Plug n Play systems may work for a specific location or type of rescue but may not work in every situation Training for these systems should address what to do if the device system malfunctions or if it will not work for the type of scenario you may be faced with Customized Pre rigged Systems These are customized pre rigged systems that rescuers build for site specific needs and their team s needs using existing equipment and training Confined space and rope rescue can be broken down to three core tasks 1 Lowering 2 Safety line Belay and 3 Mechanical Advantage Retrieval systems You can build pre rigged systems that make sense for your specific needs Many of the teams we work with have adopted a three bag system For example one rope bag is designated for Lowering along with the typical equipment needed for a lowering

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/techniques/page/3/ (2016-02-15)
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