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  • Quick Drill - Belay Systems
    during your next rescue 1 As a team discuss the belay needs of your environment type of device or hitch need for confined space rigging high point low point usage one person two person loads etc 2 Divide your team into pairs and have each pair rig a specified device or hitch as a horizontal ground station 3 While one member operates the device the other attaches to the working end of the belay line and walks backwards to simulate a moving load The team member on the line can also simulate a sudden load being applied to the rope at random intervals for the belayer to catch by pulling quickly on the working end of the rope 4 If using the 540 Belay Device develop proficiency in releasing a stuck load 5 When using a Munter work on body hand position and tying off the Munter with a mule knot and releasing the mule knot while under load 6 With tandem prusiks practice converting to a lower system 7 No matter what device or system focus on maintaining a steady rate of rope progress through the device while maintaining the proper amount of slack in the system maximum 18 inches 8 Have members switch positions and or devices as they work on proficiency 9 If time and training space allow rig simple lower haul scenarios where the emphasis will be on belay practice In these scenarios focus on the following Communication between the Rescue Master and the Belayer Maintaining the appropriate amount of slack in the belay system no more than 18 inches Efficient belay skills are often taken for granted Be sure to master the use of these critical lifesaving systems Previous Next New Stuff Atmospheric Monitors May NOT Detect All Dangers Roco QUICK DRILL 10 Tripod Quick

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/quick-drill-belay-systems (2016-02-15)
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  • Training to Become a Fall 'Pro' Is a Never-Ending Journey
    fall protection training To learn every single OSHA requirement regarding fall protection is a very tall order I don t know of any fall protection Competent Person course that covers it all or would attempt to cover it all And to know the particular challenges of every location where work is performed at height can only be gained through experience In order to move toward mastering the craft it is important to take the initiative to learn beyond the formal training However self study is so much easier than it was 15 or 20 years ago The ease of accessing OSHA standards letters of interpretation summaries and explanations of final rules and other OSHA resources pertaining to fall protection on the World Wide Web opens up a wealth of information It is also my good fortune that I visit many different client sites where I encounter a smorgasbord of fall protection challenges that provide learning opportunities Oftentimes I am able to recite the information nearly verbatim that pertains to the issue but as often as not I need to do some research to locate the answer or to refresh my memory once again This is expected and in lieu of a photographic memory there is just too much information to learn and retain with 100 percent accuracy With the emerging technologies in manufacturing and design of fall protection equipment and systems it is often a great learning exercise to visit some of the leading equipment manufacturers and retailers online catalogs It is actually pretty exciting to peruse these sites and see many of these modern solutions And the equipment isn t limited to lanyards and body support either There are solutions such as temporary or permanent retro fitted guardrail systems harness mount SRLs nonpenetrating anchor connectors temporary user installed horizontal lifelines and the list goes on Inviting a fall protection dealer representative to your site may prove to be very educational and beneficial time spent Sharing Lessons Learned Back in my military days we had a program known as CROSSTELL which was a formal messaging system designed to share lessons learned and to disseminate new ideas or techniques between common users Within the private sector there are similar programs known as BKP best known practices or BKM best known methods that often provide a vehicle to share useful information within a common industry or within a single corporation The warning here is to cross check the BKM or BKP to ensure it is indeed compliant with any applicable legislated requirements And if you develop what you feel is a BKM or BKP don t be bashful about sharing Much of the continuing education we have talked about so far is in black and white in the form of regulations or interpretations or a form of equipment that has accompanying printed user instructions The intangibles are often the most difficult and dynamic pieces of the puzzle to learn Getting out into the work environment is a very big part of your

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/training-to-become-a-fall-pro-is-a-never-ending-journey (2016-02-15)
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  • OSHA Revises Publication to Protect the Safety of Firefighters
    while doing their jobs The revised manual explains how fire personnel can resolve an incident sooner and in a safer manner if a building design is tailored to meet their needs during an emergency The manual includes new chapters on water supply and integrating design elements to protect fire personnel during a building s construction occupancy and demolition phases new sections on energy conservation emergency power and room and floor numbering and additional photos to help explain concepts The manual is aimed at helping emergency responders during fires and other emergencies such as hazardous material releases emergency medical care non fire rescues and terrorist attacks To better protect emergency responders in these situations the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has revised its manual Fire Service Features of Buildings and Fire Protection Systems Previous Next New Stuff Atmospheric Monitors May NOT Detect All Dangers Roco QUICK DRILL 10 Tripod Quick Drill Service Life Guidelines for Rescue Equipment NFPA Issues New Guide for Confined Spaces Gravedigger Engulfed In Cave in of Unguarded Grave Hot Topics ATMOSPHERIC HAZARDS 6 CONFINED SPACE 58 EQUIPMENT 36 FALL PROTECTION 16 FIRE FIGHTERS 1 HOW TO VIDEOS 6 INCIDENTS 27 MISCELLANEOUS 40 NEWS 90 OSHA MEMORANDUM 2

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/osha-revises-pub-safety-of-firefighters (2016-02-15)
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  • RescueTalk™
    the employer has ordered or otherwise arranged to obtain such equipment required for compliance and is taking alternative measures to protect employees from confined space hazards and Whether the employer has engaged in any additional efforts to educate workers about confined space hazards and protect workers from those hazards read more Roco QUICK DRILL 8 Petzl ID Thursday August 27 2015 Maintain Proficiency with Ground Station Drills The Petzl ID is a great device However as with any device or technique if you don t practice you risk forgetting some of the basic principles and functions involved in its proper use Using quick and easy to set up ground stations will help to keep proficiency levels up while reducing risk logistics and time required Here are some drills and ground station ideas that will help the Petzl ID operator stay proficient Keep in mind these hands on ground stations can often be applied to other devices and techniques as well not every training session requires suspending rescuers Station Set Up Choose a solid anchor at ground level with about 10 feet of space to move and pull rope This can be done in a classroom apparatus bay or other area since the drill is about proficiency in using the ID and its different functions Taking in Slack TENSION Have the participant load and anchor the device as a lower Pull at least 5 to 10 feet of slack out of the device and have participant pull the slack out of the system through the device as if setting a plumb point Have the operator stand in front of the ID facing the anchor Hold the two ends of the rope in front of the device and close together This will prevent the safety cam from grabbing the rope while the participant strips rope on the standing end of the device the 11 O clock to take in tension slack Remember taking in slack tensioning is also important when starting a Z rig haul as the system may not automatically start stripping cleaning the rope through the device if it should be locked In this case the load would not be captured and any progress gained would be lost or dropped if the haul team let go of the haul line This may also occur initially with a 5 1 Z rig even if the device is unlocked until the full load is on the system Giving out Slack SLACK To give out or feed slack have the operator remain in the descent control position behind the device Keeping the device with the top or bottom plates facing the ground simply use the left hand to turn the body of the ID perpendicular to the direction of the load travel as rope is pulled with the right hand from the 7 O clock position of the ID Simulate adjusting a plumb point or feeding slack once a lower is complete and the patient is on the ground Rappel Ground Exercise Have participants anchor the rope for a rappel and attach the ID to the rope and their harnesses Have them lean away from the anchor and walk backwards while using the device to control speed Review hand and body positions and have operators pull the ID into panic mode and reset Direct participants to let go of the rope in order to build confidence in the automatic braking of the device Also have them practice tensioning and feeding slack adjusting rappel plumb point while in the rappel mode This drill may seem too simple to be of any benefit but how many of us have watched our teammate fumble with loading or fumble while trying to adjust the tension or give slack on an anchored ID The more hands on time operating this device the better Practicing a technique at ground level will help rescuers be more proficient when they live load a system during training or when performing a real rescue The Petzl ID Video Review the features of the popular rescue tool with Roco Chief Dennis O Connell read more Six Egregious Violations filed by OSHA for Houston Trench Incident Tuesday August 04 2015 One minute a worker was working in the 8 foot trench below ground The next he was being buried in it His co workers came to his rescue digging him out with their bare hands Moments after they pulled the injured man to safety the unprotected trench collapsed again His injuries were serious and led to his hospitalization What s more the man s Houston area employer knew the Richmond Texas excavation site was dangerous but failed to protect its workers OSHA has since cited the company for 16 safety violations including six egregious willful violations for failing to protect workers inside an excavation from a cave in The company faces penalties totaling 423 900 For more than 2 500 years man has known how to prevent deadly trench collapses It is absolutely unacceptable that employers continue to endanger the lives of workers in trenches said Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr David Michaels In addition to the willful violations the company was cited for nine serious violations including failing to remove debris from the edge of the excavation The company also did not provide a safe means to get in and out of the excavation for workers or conduct atmospheric testing inside excavations after a sewer leak Trench cave ins are preventable said John Hermanson OSHA s regional administrator in Dallas There are long established basic precautions They re not new and they re not secret This company knew its trenches weren t safe but still put its workers in harm s way OSHA has also placed the company in its Severe Violator Enforcement Program The program concentrates resources on inspecting employers who have demonstrated indifference towards creating a safe and healthy workplace by committing willful or repeated violations and or failing to abate known hazards It also mandates follow

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/page/2/ (2016-02-15)
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  • RescueTalk™
    equipment or techniques Once these requirements are met we ll ask 3 Does it add efficiency to the rescue effort And is it efficient in terms of time manpower and equipment needed When evaluating a new piece of equipment for our programs we will also consider how versatile the item may be To have one piece of equipment that performs multiple functions is a huge benefit to rescuers in that it saves time money weight and bulk One example of a product that performs multiple functions is the Petzl ID The ID can be used as the foundation of MA systems it can also be used for short ascents and the manufacturer now allows it to be used as a belay device Compliance with legislated regulations is also a big consideration For performance based regulations like 1910 146 Permit Required Confined Spaces it s all about creating a competent rescuer who is capable of safely and effectively in permit spaces Other relevant OSHA regulations include Fall Protection Respiratory Protection Lock Out Tag Out and HAZMAT just to name a few We also refer to many different nationally recognized consensus standards as we build our programs Probably the most visited we draw from are NFPA 1006 and 1983 which offer guidance on professional qualifications for rescuers and equipment standards for manufacturers We also rely on ANSI NATE SPRAT and IRATA as well as other standards that provide appropriate guidance for the type of program we are delivering But where do we come up with the leading edge techniques and equipment that we are continuously adding to our courses Well this is where we take a lot of pride in how we operate internally as a business Roco s leadership has always encouraged our instructors and rescue personnel to identify needs in the rescue world and think of a way to satisfy that need yes to build a better mousetrap We want our people to constantly be on the lookout for opportunities to evaluate new equipment or come up with a new technique that meets the three primary objectives that we identified earlier As an added benefit Roco instructors and rescue team members come from a wide variety of backgrounds This includes the fire service law enforcement U S military and private sector industrial emergency response teams What s more some of our personnel enjoy sport climbing and even expedition mountaineering on their off time In other words we have a very diverse way of putting ropes and associated hardware to the test Everyone is encouraged to share their ideas Oftentimes this free thinking among our personnel leads to a great step forward in efficiency and allows us to keep our courses leading the way to a better rescuer It s also exciting to see some of the emerging technologies that have come to market as far as rescue equipment is concerned By encouraging our personnel to get their hands on these new pieces of kit and ride them hard we are able to determine if it is something that needs to be incorporated into our scheme Every once in a while we ll even discover a new way to use the equipment that is beyond what the manufacturer envisioned Our people have come up with some very unique ways to meet some very specific rescue needs But it all comes back to those same three primary objectives We need a piece of gear or a technique that will do the job we need it to do and do it safely and efficiently Here s a great example who would have thought that a technique used on glacier crevasse rescue would be a skill that comes in handy in an industrial environment Fortunately someone in our think tank did and now it is a staple of our curricula So if it s been a while since you have attended a Roco class maybe it s time to come see what we have been up to lately For the ultimate rope rescue experience click on Roco s Fast Track 120 read more Q A What are the Rescue Requirements for Trenches Excavations Tuesday May 19 2015 READER QUESTION One of our readers recently asked about rescue requirements in excavations We did some searching and found an interesting Letter of Interpretation LOI from OSHA that explains when rescue provisions are required during trenching operations ROCO TECH PANEL ANSWER The following is from OSHA LOI in regards to this answer In regard to whether emergency rescue equipment is required at every trenching job site located near or passing by a gas station refinery gas line sewer main etc please be advised by the following Emergency rescue equipment is required to be readily available where a competent person determines based on the conditions at each job site that hazardous atmospheric conditions exist or may reasonably be expected to develop during work in an excavation In regard to whether a contractor can rely on a local rescue squad instead of providing the rescue equipment please be advised that many emergency situations associated with the hazards involved with hazardous atmospheres in trenches would normally require an immediate response within a few minutes or even seconds A rescue squad would be unable to provide the necessary response and therefore could not be used to comply with 1926 651 g 2 As more and more industrial sites realize that just about every day somewhere on their property there is an open trench Trench collapses cause dozens of fatalities and hundreds of injuries each year Obviously this creates concerns especially for the rescue personnel who may be called to the scene during an emergency We ve been getting questions from clients that have effective rescue teams for medical hazmat fire confined space and rope but are realizing that they are lacking if a trench collapse occurs on their site Who will do the rescue is a question often asked There is concern by supervisors who have been given the responsibility for

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/page/3/ (2016-02-15)
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  • RescueTalk™
    times I feel they are under appreciated Until a major national disaster hits many of us are guilty of overlooking the risks that these men and women take on a regular basis I also think it s important for employers to understand the extensive set of skills and wide variety of skills that emergency responders are required to master in order to perform their primary job responsibilities Extensive Skill Requirements for Municipal Responders For example firefighters are required to maintain a wide variety of special skills such as pump operations ventilation PPE emergency vehicle driving along with medical skills such as advanced airway management pharmacology advanced cardiac life support and are you getting the picture The skills and knowledge required to perform technical rope rescue is a specialty not typically included in a firefighter s job description unless they are assigned to a heavy technical rescue HTR squad NFPA 1006 2013 edition with next one coming in 2017 lists all the specialty areas that a rescue service may be called on to master The first set of requirements is established by the department s authority having jurisdiction AHJ and may include such things as a minimum level of physical fitness HAZMAT training emergency medical care training and several other requirements Then there is what used to be referred to as core skills now known as Job Performance Requirements These requirements are extensive before even addressing any of the 19 different technical rescue specialty areas such as swift water rescue trench rescue machinery rescue structural collapse rescue wilderness rescue and the list goes on Also included in this list is confined space rescue In Albuquerque New Mexico where I live we are fortunate to have a dedicated HTR squad within our fire department that is trained equipped and staffed 24 7 This team is called upon to respond to flash flood rescues in our many arroyos mountain rescue in the peaks east of the city vehicle entrapments on two interstate highways as well as our surface streets and may also be called to an employer s work site to perform a variety of rescues there This could be anything from trench rescue to you guessed it confined space rescue CS Emergencies Require Special Skills and Equipment It is fairly rare that municipal responders are provided the resources including specialized training and equipment to safely and effectively respond to confined space rescue emergencies Rarer still for these responders to have been afforded the opportunity to practice in the types of confined space rescues that may be required in their local industrial corridors Any rescue service would need to be trained and equipped in advance to handle the many hazards and obstacles of permit required confined spaces It is the employer s responsibility both morally and legally to engage with the 911 service that is being considered as their confined space rescue service Appendix F of 1910 146 is a very valuable means to ensure that both the rescuers and the employer know what the requirements are and that proper agreements are in place prior to confined space entry operations Roco has provided a sample for you to download Any shortfalls must be addressed This may include lack of training equipment staffing or many other requirements necessary to ensure a response appropriate for the types and hazards of the spaces onsite OSHA states in section d 4 of 1910 146 that the Employer shall provide rescue and emergency equipment needed to comply with paragraph d 9 of this section except to the extent that the equipment is provided by rescue services This is where an employer and a public safety agency may enter a cooperative arrangement beyond what is already expected of the 911 responder s normal duties Funding through grants and other resources has become very lean in the last several years As public safety budgets are trimmed down both career and volunteer fire departments must make budgetary decisions that in many cases result in sacrificing emergency service capabilities beyond firefighting and emergency medical services This would mean that many of the technical rescue capabilities outlined in NFPA 1006 are not within the means of many fire departments The impact on an employer may be that they lose a previously established ability to rely on a 911 agency for their confined space rescue needs or they may not be able to rely on that rescue service option during the development of their permit required confined space program However we also understand that it is becoming more and more common for employers to provide rescue equipment and or funding for rescue training specific to the needs of the employer s confined space program Various state and local requirements may differ but generally this can be accomplished by having the employer set up a grant with monies being donated for specific training or equipment purchases Depending on the local ordinances equipment can be directly transferred from the employer to the 911 agency through a simple agreement that outlines its intended purpose and ownership There may be tax advantages to the employer while benefiting the community as well Bottom line there are critical steps to take before relying solely on a local 911 agency Evaluating Rescue Response Capabilities Appendix F of 1910 146 clearly explains the need for employers to evaluate a prospective rescue service before depending upon their services It states Merely posting the service s number or planning to rely on the 911 emergency phone number to obtain these services at the time of a permit space emergency would not comply with paragraph k 1 of the standard Other critical factors include response time and availability Response time is generally extended when relying on an offsite rescue service such as 911 According to OSHA the response time must be appropriate for the types of known or potential hazards affecting the confined spaces at the employer s facility Relevant factors include 1 Location of the rescue team or service relative to the employer s workplace 2 Quality of roads and highways to be traveled 3 Potential bottlenecks or traffic congestion that might be encountered in transit 4 Reliability of the rescuer s vehicles and the training and skill of its drivers And what about the availability of the rescue service Is it unavailable at certain times of the day or in certain situations What is the likelihood that key personnel of the rescue service might be unavailable at times If the rescue service becomes unavailable while an entry is underway does it have the capability of notifying the employer so that the entry operation can be aborted immediately In fact these considerations also apply to any of the three means of providing a confined space rescue service be it an in house service a contracted service or a 911 emergency response However response times and availability are typically crucial limitations in relying on 911 for confined space rescue Careful Planning Required If you have identified 911 as the rescue service written into your confined space program it is crucial that you take all the necessary steps to vet the agency as being a good fit to protect your employees In addition to all requirements of Appendix F it is of utmost importance to pay particular attention to the service s ability to respond in a time appropriate for your needs and to ensure that reliable two way communications are in place The 911 dispatch will be notified when entry operations are to commence and just as importantly the 911 dispatch will notify the employer when the service is not able to respond to an emergency so entry operations can be immediately aborted With careful planning thorough communications and proper training and equipment relying on 911 response for confined space rescue can work Unfortunately in some instances the outcome is tragic with loss of life not only to the entrants but also to the unprepared 911 responders who had little clue as to what they were about to encounter As an employer it is your responsibility to make sure the rescue service is adequately prepared Additional OSHA References 1910 146 d 9 Develop and implement procedures for summoning rescue and emergency services for rescuing entrants from permit spaces for providing necessary emergency services to rescued employees and for preventing unauthorized personnel from attempting a rescue 1910 146 k 1 An employer who designates rescue and emergency services pursuant to paragraph d 9 of 1910 146 k 1 i Evaluate a prospective rescuer s ability to respond to a rescue summons in a timely manner considering the hazard s identified 1910 146 k 2 i Provide affected employees with the personal protective equipment PPE needed to conduct permit space rescues safely and train affected employees so they are proficient in the use of that PPE at no cost to those employees 1910 146 k 2 ii Train affected employees to perform assigned rescue duties The employer must ensure that such employees successfully complete the training required to establish proficiency as an authorized entrant as provided by paragraphs g and h of this section 1910 146 k 2 iii Train affected employees in basic first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation CPR The employer shall ensure that at least one member of the rescue team or service holding a current certification in first aid and CPR is available and 1910 146 k 2 iv Ensure that affected employees practice making permit space rescues at least once every 12 months by means of simulated rescue operations in which they remove dummies manikins or actual persons from the actual permit spaces or from representative permit spaces Representative permit spaces shall with respect to opening size configuration and accessibility simulate the types of permit spaces from which rescue is to be performed Note to paragraph k l i What will be considered timely will vary according to the specific hazards involved in each entry For example 1910 134 Respiratory Protection requires that employers provide a standby person or persons capable of immediate action to rescue employee s wearing respiratory protection while in work areas defined as IDLH atmospheres read more Roco Safer Way Banner Giveaway Tuesday March 17 2015 One of our awesome customers had a great safety idea and we wanted to share it with you a Roco Safer Way banner Of course if you ve ever been a Roco student you ve heard it many times there s a safe way and a safer way Now you can win a FREE Roco Safety Banner 4 ft x 2 ft for your workplace During a plant turnaround this customer used the Roco Safer Way banner to keep safety at the forefront while maybe also offering a subtle reminder for everyone to be grateful for their on site emergency responders It is our hope that these banners will encourage someone to think or re think a situation and make it even safer Register now to win a Roco Safety banner and remind your personnel of the safer way read more RTC Expands to Meet Rescuer Needs Wednesday February 18 2015 C onstruction is well underway on expansions and improvements to the Roco Training Center RTC The goal is to add new confined space shapes and configurations in order to simulate an even wider variety of scenarios that rescuers may face in the real world An additional two story container configuration is being erected east of the pipe rack module This will add 10 vertical confined spaces 2 horizontal confined spaces and 7 more student platforms for staging rescue equipment and training evolutions The new area will be under a covered roof making rescue training on the prop a bit more user friendly in our south Louisiana climate Nearly complete is the new stairway on the south side of the prop that will provide additional access to the structure and more anchor points for rescue students taking courses at RTC With these new features the prop is increasing its student capacity by approximately 33 rescuers per day Last year a boil er simulator was added which focuses on extremely tight 12 x 15 horizontal confined spaces found at many industrial settings old and new Roco is constantly surveying our students to find out what their particular problem spaces are said Dennis O Connell Director of Training for Roco We try to duplicate those confined spaces at RTC so students can practice the skills they will need if a problem occurs at their site This way they get a more accurate experience The anticipated completion date for the additions to RTC is April 15 2015 It is sure to add a few more challenges for Roco students who are familiar with the prop as well as a few more conveniences read more Roco Tech Panel Q A Prompt Rescue by Shift Sunday February 01 2015 READER QUESTION Our company procedures require an on site rescue capability for permit required confined space entry operations during normal Monday Friday day shift operations but for entries other than during that shift we rely on an off site rescue service Shouldn t the rescue capability specifically the rescue response time be the same no matter when the permit required confined space entries are being made ROCO TECH PANEL ANSWER Yes and no not necessarily Yes if the nature of any known or potential hazards that may affect the entrants in the permit space and the configuration of the confined space are the same during regular M F day shift as they would be during off shift entries then the answer is yes The rescue capability regarding response time manning equipment and overall performance capability should be the same No not necessarily For example if the nature of the known or potential hazards of a permit space entered during the day shift requires a shorter response time or if the configuration of the space requires a higher level of rescue expertise rescuer PPE number of rescue personnel or if there is any other factor that may require a different performance capability than the requirements of the day shift entries then no the same rescue capability would not necessarily be required This is because OSHA 1910 146 is a performance based standard For confined space rescue specifically regarding what would be considered prompt rescue the performance standard will be most influenced by the nature of the potential and known hazards and how quickly the hazards will affect the authorized entrants as well as the complexity of providing effective rescue from the particular permit required confined space To demonstrate this point here are some extracts from OSHA 1910 146 Permit Required Confined Space Regulation Section K the Summary and Explanation of the Final Rule and also from OSHA 1910 146 Appendix F From 1910 146 k 1 i Evaluate a prospective rescuer s ability to respond to a rescue summons in a timely manner considering the hazard s identified Note to paragraph k 1 i What will be considered timely will vary according to the specific hazards involved in each entry For example 1910 134 Respiratory Protection requires that employers provide a standby person or persons capable of immediate action to rescue employee s wearing respiratory protection while in work areas defined as IDLH atmospheres From the Summary and Explanation of the Final Rule 1910 146 OSHA has therefore decided to promulgate the requirement it proposed for timely rescue a requirement that was not opposed by any rulemaking participant rather than to define precisely what is timely That determination will be based on the particular circumstances and hazards of each confined space circumstances and hazards which the employer must take into account in developing a rescue plan OSHA has added a note to paragraph k 1 i to clarify this point From 1910 146 Appendix F A Initial Evaluation II 1 What are the needs of the employer with regard to response time time for the rescue service to receive notification arrive at the scene and set up and be ready for entry For example if entry is to be made into an IDLH atmosphere or into a space that can quickly develop an IDLH atmosphere if ventilation fails or for other reasons the rescue team or service would need to be standing by at the permit space On the other hand if the danger to entrants is restricted to mechanical hazards that would cause injuries e g broken bones abrasions a response time of 10 or 15 minutes might be adequate The response time of the rescue service is also different than the time needed to provide rescue Response time generally means the time it takes for the rescue service to arrive on scene From that time forward the rescue service must perform a size up identify and don PPE set up rescue systems and perform many other tasks before initiating entry rescue Any need to provide victim packaging or to deliver breathing air to the victim will add to the total time it takes to complete the rescue Therefore it is imperative that the employer ensures that the measure of Prompt Rescue is driven by the nature of the known or potential hazards of the permitted confined space as well as the complexities of the configuration of the space and how those will effect the time required to the setup the rescue system Roco provides confined space rescue services for a variety of industries and is confronted with a very wide range of hazards associated with the entry operations and a vast range of space configurations The determination on the rescue team s posture is based primarily on the answer to the following questions 1 How quickly will the entrants be overcome by the known or potential hazard s of the space and or how quickly will the entrants suffer permanent injury if exposed to those hazards 2 If non entry retrieval systems are not employed due to the system not contributing to an effective rescue or the retrieval

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/page/4/ (2016-02-15)
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  • RescueTalk™
    Types 5 and 6 are bottom entries There are two types of each due to portal size as discussed above Openings greater than 24 inches will allow packaged patients on rigid litters or rescuers using SCBA to negotiate the opening Spaces less than 24 inches will require a higher level of expertise and different packaging and patient movement techniques Confined Space Portal Types defined by OSHA Because OSHA 1910 146 requires employers to allow access for rescue planning and practice purposes here s an opportunity to be better prepared and practiced on thetypes of spaces in the response area So get out your clipboard tape measure some sketch paper and a flashlight if safe to do so in order to view as much of the interior of the space as you can Gaining access to architectural or engineering drawings may also be helpful in determining the internal configuration of the space for the times that actual entry is not feasible Armed with this information it is time to type the spaces in your response area using the Roco CS Types Chart Once this is completed pay particular attention to spaces that have been identified as Types 1 3 or 5 These spaces have restrictive portals 24 inches or less and are considered worst case regarding entry and escape in terms of portal size As mentioned this is very important because it will greatly influence the types of patient packaging equipment and rescuer PPE that can be used in the space Another critical consideration is accessibility to the space or elevation of the portal While the rescue service may practice rescues from Top Side and Bottom portals if it s from ground level that s very different from a portal that s at a 100 ft elevation Here s where high angle or elevated rescue techniques normally are required for getting the patient lowered to ground level This is important Rescue practice from a representative space needs to be a true representation of the kind of rescue that may be required in an emergency In Appendix F OSHA offers guidelines for determining Representative Spaces for Rescue Practice OSHA adds that teams may practice in representative spaces that are worst case or most restrictive with respect to internal configuration elevation and portal size These characteristics according to OSHA should be considered when deciding whether a space is truly representative of an actual permit space Roco Note Practice in portals that are greater than 24 inches is also important so that rescuers can practice using all proper patient packaging protocols that may be allowed with larger size openings 1 Internal Configuration If the interior of the space is congested with utilities or other structural components that may hinder movement or the ability to efficiently package a patient it must be addressed in training For example will the use of entrant rescuer retrieval lines be feasible After one or two 90 degree turns around corners or around structural members the ability to provide external retrieval of the entrant rescuer is probably forfeited For vertical rescue if there are offset platforms or passageways there may be a need for directional pulleys or intermediate haul systems that are operated inside the space What about rescues while on emergency breathing air If the internal configuration is so congested that the time required to complete patient packaging exceeds the duration of a backpack SCBA then the team should consider using SAR Will the internal configuration hinder or prevent visual monitoring and communications with the entrant rescuers If so it may be advisable to use an internal hole watch to provide a communication link between the entrant rescuers and personnel outside the space What if the internal configuration is such that complete patient packaging is not possible inside the space This may dictate a load and go type rescue that provides minimal patient packaging while providing as much stabilization as feasible through the use of extrication type short spine boards as an example 2 Elevation If the portal is 4 feet or greater above grade the rescue team must be capable of providing an effective and safe high angle lower of the victim and if needed an attendant rescuer This may require additional training and equipment For these situations it is important to identify high point anchors that may be suitable for use or plan for portable high point anchors such as a knuckle lift or some other device 3 Portal Size The magic number is 24 inches or less in diameter for round portals or in the smallest dimension for non round portals It is a common mistake for a rescue team to test drive their 22 to 23 inch wide litter or backboard on a 24 inch portal without a victim loaded and discover that it just barely fits The problem arises when a victim is loaded into the litter The only way the litter or backboard will fit is at the equator of the round portal This will most likely not leave enough room between the rigid litter or backboard and the victim s chest except for our more petite victims And it s already difficult to negotiate a portal while wearing a backpack SCBA For portals of 24 inches or less it is nearly impossible DO NOT under any circumstances remove your backpack SCBA in order gain access to a confined space through a restricted portal or passageway If the backpack SCBA will not fit it is time to consider an airline respirator and emergency escape harness bottle instead By using the Roco Types Chart in preplanning these worst case portals and the spaces that fall into the type 1 3 or 5 categories the rescue team will be able to determine in advance that different equipment or techniques may be required in order to effect rescue through these type portals ROCO NOTE In Appendix F OSHA uses less than 24 inches in Section B 8 however in 3 Portal Size a Restricted it uses 24 inches or less which we are using in our Types Chart 4 Space Access Horizontal vs Vertical Most rescuers regard horizontal retrievals as easier than vertical This is not always the case If there are floor projections pipe work or other utilities or just a grated floor surface it may create an incredible amount of friction or an absolute impediment to the horizontal movement of an inert victim In this case the entrant rescuers may have to rely on old fashioned arm and leg strength to maneuver the victim Once the victim is moved to the portal it may become an incredibly difficult task to lift a harnessed victim up and over the lower edge of the portal Even if the portal is as little as three feet above the level of the victim it is very difficult to lift a victim s dead weight up and over the portal lower edge Sometimes using a long backboard as an internal ramp may do the trick For vertical access there may be a need for additional training or equipment to provide the lifting or lowering capability for both the victim and the entrant rescuer Appropriate rescue pre plans and realistic rescue practice can be one of the best ways to be prepared for confined space rescues and allow rescuers to operate more safely and effectively in an emergency situation Roco CS Types Chart can be used as a quick reference when doing an initial assessment of confined spaces and permit required confined spaces It helps in designing rescue training and practice drills that will truly prepare rescuers for the particular spaces on site The information can also be used when conducting performance evaluations for your team a contracted stand by rescue service a local off site response team or a contractor who supplies their own rescue services while working in your plant In section k OSHA requires employers to evaluate the prospective rescue service to determine proficiency in terms of rescue related tasks and proper equipment If you are relying on a contracted rescue service or if an on site contractor is providing their own rescue capabilities we encourage you to have them perform a simulated rescue from a representative type space Otherwise if an incident occurs and the rescuers you are depending on are not capable of safely performing a rescue your company could be culpable read more OSHA s Confined Space Construction Rule Under OMB Review Tuesday November 25 2014 OSHA s final rule on confined spaces in construction is being reviewed by the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs The review is one of the final steps required before OSHA can formally publish the rule OIRA which is a branch of the White House s Office of Management and Budget received the rule for review on Nov 14 The office is limited to a 90 day review but can request an extension The rule has been in the works since at least 2003 the proposed rule was published in 2007 Several provisions in the proposed rule are similar to those found in the agency s confined spaces standard for general industry That rule issued in 1993 mandates specific procedures and includes requirements such as a written program atmospheric monitoring and training Stand by for additional updates on this regulation News story from the National Safety Council read more VFD Acquires Rescue Equipment Through Firehouse Subs Foundation Monday November 24 2014 More than 15 000 in fire rescue equipment was donated to a local volunteer fire department in Washington WV through the Firehouse Subs Foundation The equipment for the Washington Bottom department is for confined areas such as off road industrial and water related accidents And the department s members are already trained to use it It s nice to know we have the people with the knowledge the skills and now the equipment to use the equipment properly said Fire Chief K C Lindner We have the folks who have spent the many hours training and perfecting it Now we have the equipment to use Picture above Roco Student Ryan Goldsmith demonstrating the rope rescue equipment Money for the donations comes from the purchase of Firehouse s used pickle barrels by its customers The chain has been providing equipment to first responders for nearly a decade Story source http www thenewscenter tv news headlines Fighting Fire With Firehouse 283402671 html read more Atmospheric Monitoring Frequency Update for Roco Students Friday November 07 2014 One of our very attentive students recently noticed a statement in our Study Guide that was incorrectly attributed to OSHA when it is really a Roco Best Practices Guideline In the Confined Space chapter of our Study Guide it states that OSHA requires air monitoring within 30 minutes of the entry and this is not an OSHA requirement The 30 minute timeline is a Roco recommendation for conducting baseline pre testing prior to entry but it is not an OSHA requirement The revised wording is explained below You may click here to download and print the corrected pages for your Roco Study Guide If you have any questions or need assistance please contact the Roco office at 800 647 7626 CONFINED SPACE CHAPTER 1 ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING Page 13 ROCO RECOMMENDATION Although OSHA does not define a specific timeline to conduct pre entry atmospheric monitoring we recommend that a baseline test be conducted approximately 30 minutes prior to the entry and then another test conducted immediately prior to entry A comparison of these readings could indicate that atmospheric changes have occurred inside the space If a space has been vacated for a period of time it is recommended that similar baseline testing be repeated Also while OSHA allows for periodic monitoring and sets no exact timespan between testing Roco recommends continuous air monitoring any time workers are in the space In addition pre entry testing as well as periodic testing should be based on the hazard assessment for a given space to include any previous work activities that may have introduced atmospheric hazards as well as any known history of hazardous atmospheric conditions Another consideration is how rapidly those hazards can change the atmosphere which may require additional precautions for safe entry 2 MONITORING FREQUENCY Page 15 OSHA does not define a specific timeline for conducting pre entry atmospheric monitoring or periodic testing OSHA 1910 146 c 5 refers to testing the internal atmosphere before an employee enters the space and testing as necessary to maintain acceptable entry conditions Testing should be based on the hazard assessment for a given space as well as how rapidly those hazards could cause a change in the atmosphere which may require additional action for safe entry As a safer way Roco recommends continuous monitoring while employees are inside a permit required confined space Frequently Asked Questions PRCS Standard Clarification OSHA gov How much periodic testing is required The frequency of testing depends on the nature of the permit space and the results of the initial testing performed under paragraph c 5 ii c The requirement in paragraph c 5 ii F for periodic testing as necessary to ensure the space is maintained within the limits of the acceptable entry conditions is critical OSHA believes that all permit space atmospheres are dynamic due to variables such as temperature pressure physical characteristics of the material posing the atmospheric hazard variable efficiency of ventilation equipment and air delivery system etc The employer will have to determine and document on an individual permit space basis what the frequency of testing will be and under what conditions the verification testing will be done What does testing or monitoring as necessary mean as required by 1910 146 d 5 ii to decide if the acceptable entry conditions are being maintained The standard does not have specific frequency rates because of the performance oriented nature of the standard and the unique hazards of each permit space However there will always be to some degree testing or monitoring during entry operations which is reflective of the atmospheric hazard The employer must determine the degree and the frequency of testing or monitoring Some of the factors that affect frequency are Results of test allowing entry The regularity of entry daily weekly or monthly The uniformity of the permit space the extent to which the configuration use and contents vary The documented history of previous monitoring activities Knowledge of the hazards which affect the permit space as well as the historical experience gained from monitoring results of previous entries Knowledge and recorded data gained from successive entries such as ventilation required to maintain acceptable entry conditions may be used to document changes in the frequency of monitoring OSHA 1910 146 REFERENCES 1910 146 c 5 ii C Before an employee enters the space the internal atmosphere shall be tested with a calibrated direct reading instrument for oxygen content for flammable gases and vapors and for potential toxic air contaminants in that order Any employee who enters the space or that employee s authorized representative shall be provided an opportunity to observe the pre entry testing required by this paragraph 1910 146 c 5 ii F The atmosphere within the space shall be periodically tested as necessary to ensure that the continuous forced air ventilation is preventing the accumulation of a hazardous atmosphere Any employee who enters the space or that employee s authorized representative shall be provided with an opportunity to observe the periodic testing required by this paragraph 1910 146 d 5 i Test conditions in the permit space to determine if acceptable entry conditions exist before entry is authorized to begin except that if isolation of the space is infeasible because the space is large or is part of a continuous system such as a sewer pre entry testing shall be performed to the extent feasible before entry is authorized and if entry is authorized entry conditions shall be continuously monitored in the areas where authorized entrants are working 1910 146 d 5 ii Test or monitor the permit space as necessary to determine if acceptable entry conditions are being maintained during the course of entry operations read more Who is your Fall Protection MVP Wednesday October 29 2014 The following article was featured in the September issue of ISHN and authored by Roco Chief Instructor Pat Furr Every team has their most valuable player or person their MVP When you consider all the personnel who make up the fall protection team at your facility who is your MVP Chances are it is your Competent Person OSHA defines a Competent Person as One who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or working conditions which are unsanitary hazardous or dangerous to employees and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them In order to do their job and become your Fall Protection MVP it is very important that your Competent Person be well competent Understanding Regulations Standards Competence can come through formal training work experience self study or most likely a combination of all three Areas in which the Competent Person must be well versed include a thorough understanding of legislated requirements pertaining to fall protection A great deal of time must be spent visiting the applicable OSHA regulations that apply to the type of work activities that the Competent Person will be overseeing This can be rather daunting but there are plenty of resources to help in this effort OSHA provides clarification through the issuance of letters of interpretation Safety and Health Information Bulletins SHIBs and safety posters and several training institutions provide formal training covering OSHA regulations as part of their curricula In addition to understanding the OSHA legislated requirements it is also helpful that the Competent Person use consensus standards BKM and certainly any company policies that strengthen the OSHA required protections The ANSI ASSE Z359 family of standards is a big help especially Z359 2 titled Minimum Requirements for a Comprehensive Managed Fall Protection Program

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/page/5/ (2016-02-15)
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  • RescueTalk™
    Roco In 2002 he joined the company full time and is now the Director of Training and a Chief Instructor As Director of Training O Connell heads up Roco s technical rescue programs and is responsible for curriculum development instructor training and much more As a Chief Instructor he teaches Confined Space High Angle Trench Structural Collapse and Instructor Development courses Training the trainer is one of the many skills O Connell cultivated during his 20 year tenure with the New York Police Department NYPD Sgt O Connell received 14 commendations and citations as a career officer and was selected to serve on the NYPD Emergency Services Unit ESU for 17 years Besides responding to over 100 000 assignments each year this elite group served as a Special Weapons and Tactics SWAT unit for America s iconic city responding to high risk situations and providing rescue operations for transportation accidents building collapses hazardous materials incidents water rescue confined space and high angle incidents helicopter operations high rise Medevac and disorder control As a member of ESU he was extensively involved in rescue and recovery efforts at the World Trade Center from Day One As a hand selected member of FEMA s New York Task Force 1 Sgt O Connell responded to major disasters in Oklahoma City Atlanta Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic With his broad teaching experience and expertise in real world rescue O Connell is a man others want to learn from His inspiration for becoming a rescue professional As a young man O Connell was involved in an automobile crash with fatal injuries to one of his best friends At that moment he vowed to learn the proper techniques of lifesaving rescue and emergency response Mission accomplished His best advice for the novice Know your equipment like the back of your hand literally You have to protect yourself before you can help others What does he do for fun Almost anything that presents a challenge Here we see him sporting Cajun Reeboks for a little recreational trip down the bayou Only the best equipment for the job will do for Dennis read more McKenney s Fan Monday May 03 2010 Thank you for the well organized class that was packed with information I say packed but the instructors Mike A Tim R Chris presented the material in small bites so that it was easily digested As I have already told the instructors I started the course not knowing what to expect and ended the week realizing that my rope rescuing journey has just begun and I have a lot of work to do Thanks Jeff Schnaak Safety Coordinator McKenney s Inc one of Atlanta s Best Places to Work in 2009 published from email to Roco read more Useful in Haiti Monday May 03 2010 Please pass a copy of this attached letter to Ish Antonio and Josh My team and myself used the training that they taught us in confined space collapsed structure and rope rescue

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/page/24/ (2016-02-15)
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