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  • RescueTalk™
    SKED lower with attendant 2 Identify what will be used as anchors If working in a classroom or apparatus floor a chair leg could be designated as bombproof or substantial anchor depending on the rigging the team member is being asked to do If you are in the field use whatever anchors are available 3 Assign a team member to construct or rig the entire system on their own including packaging the patient This drill allows a Team Leader to identify potential weaknesses in individual performance skills while improving the team member s understanding of how the systems work The knowledge gained will also help in planning future training sessions to correct any deficiencies For the individual team member this drill will reinforce all aspects of putting systems together and identifying weak points or areas of confusion that need to be corrected read more Can I Use a Crane as Part of my Rescue Plan Thursday October 02 2014 One question that is often asked Can I use a crane as part of my rescue plan With the exception of positioning the load attachment point of a crane for a high point anchor or using a properly rated personnel basket to move rescuers and victims the answer is typically no except in very rare and unique circumstances The justification for using a crane to move personnel even for the purposes of rescue is very limited Be sure you have a clear understanding of the guidelines and precautions Both OSHA General Industry and Construction Standards severely limit the use of cranes to move personnel and prescribe the proper safety measures for these operations Using a crane for rescue is not a carte blanche exception to the requirements of these standards unless very specific criteria are met OSHA requires the use of personnel platforms when moving personnel with a crane Personnel platforms that are suspended from the load line and used in construction are covered by 29 CFR 1926 1501 g There is no specific provision in the General Industry standards so the applicable standard is 1910 180 h 3 v This provision specifically prohibits hoisting lowering swinging or traveling while anyone is on the load or hook OSHA has determined however that when the use of a conventional means of access to any elevated worksite would be impossible or more hazardous a violation of 1910 180 h 3 v will be treated as de minimis if the employer complies with the personnel platform provisions set forth in 1926 1501 g 3 4 5 6 7 and 8 Even the use of a personnel platform is restricted OSHA prohibits hoisting personnel by crane or derrick except when no safe alternative is possible OSHA has determined that hoisting with crane or derrick suspended personnel platforms constitutes a significant hazard to employees Therefore the hoisting of personnel is not permitted unless conventional means of transporting employees are not feasible Or unless conventional means present greater hazards regardless if the operation is for planned work activities or for rescue Where conventional means would not be considered safe personnel hoisting operations meeting the terms of this standard would be authorized OSHA stresses that employee safety not practicality or convenience must be the basis for the employer s choice of this method It s important to consider however that in some instances such as when entering permit required confined spaces OSHA specifically requires rescue capabilities In others the general duty to protect an employee from workplace hazards would require rescue capabilities Consequently being unprepared for rescue would not be considered a legitimate basis to claim that moving a victim by crane was the only feasible or safe means of rescue This is where the employer must complete written rescue plans or ensure that their designated rescue service has done so for permit required confined space operations and for workers at height using fall arrest systems When developing these written rescue plans it may be determined that there is no other feasible means to provide rescue without increasing the risk to the rescuer s and victim s other than using a crane to move the human load These situations would be very rare thus requiring very thorough documentation which may include written descriptions and photos of the area as part of the justification for using a crane in rescue operations Here s the key Simply relying on using a crane to move rescuers and rescue victims without completing rescue plans with very clear justification would not be in compliance with OSHA regulations It must be demonstrated that the use of a crane was the only feasible means to complete the rescue while not increasing the risk compared to other means Even then there is the potential for an OSHA Compliance Officer to determine that there were indeed other feasible and safer means In other words using a crane as part of a rescue plan must have rock solid written justification demonstrating that it is the safest feasible means to provide rescue capability On the practical side however the use of cranes as stationary temporary high point anchors can be a tremendous asset to rescuers It may also be part of a rescue plan for a confined space or a top entry fan plenum for example The use of stationary high point pulleys can allow rescuers to run their systems from the ground It can also provide the headroom to clear rescuers and packaged patients from the space or an elevated edge Of course security of the attachment of the system to the crane and the ability to lock out any potential movement are a critical part of the preplanning process Taking it a step further where some movement of the crane may be required to do the rescue extreme caution must be taken It may require advanced rigging techniques in order to prevent movement of the crane from putting undo stress on the rescue system and its components Rescuers must also evaluate if the movement would unintentionally take in or add slack to the rescue system which could place the patient in harm s way Consider this movement of a crane can take place on multiple planes left right boom up down boom in out and cable up down If movement must take place rescuers must evaluate how it might affect the operation of the rescue system Of course one of the most important considerations in using any type of mechanical device is its strength and ability or inability to feel the load If the load becomes hung up while movement is underway serious injury to the victim or overpowering of system components can happen almost instantly No matter how much experience a crane operator has when dealing with human loads there s no way he can feel if the load becomes entangled and most likely he will not be able to stop before injury or damage occurs Think of it this way just as rescuers limit the number of haul team members so they can feel the load that ability is lost when energized devices are used to do the work Applicable OSHA standards only restrict the movement of personnel with a crane The same practical safety considerations that led OSHA to enact these standards should apply to decisions involving the use of cranes for rescue For rescuers a crane is just another tool in the toolbox one that can serve as temporary stationary high point making the rescue operation an easier task However once again using a crane that will require some movement while the rescue load is suspended would be a last resort option There are just too many potential downfalls and concerns associated with using cranes in rescue This also applies to fire department aerial ladders which are essentially the same thing Rescuers must consider the manufacturer s recommendation for use who knows their equipment best What does the manufacturer say about human loads And what about the attachment of human loads to different parts of the crane or aerial So to answer the question Can I include the use of a crane as part of my written rescue preplan Well it s yes and no The use of any powered load movement will most likely be an OSHA violation the question is will it be considered a de minimis violation if used during a rescue Most likely it will depend on the specifics of the incident However you can be sure that OSHA will be looking for justification as to why using a crane in motion was considered to be the least hazardous choice Municipal Emergency Responders This article was primarily directed toward private employers who control permit required confined spaces and have Authorized Persons working at height while using fall arrest systems When an employer fails to ensure that rescue preplans have been completed or fails to inform a municipal agency that has agreed to provide rescue service to their facility about the types of rescues they may be summoned to it places the municipal responders in a very difficult position If municipal responders have not had the opportunity to complete a rescue plan ahead of time they will have to do a real time size up once on scene Due to difficult access victim condition and or available equipment and personnel resources it may be determined that using a crane to move rescuers and victims is the best course of action Ultimately it is the responsibility of the employer to ensure that rescue plans are completed ahead of time Planning before the emergency will go a long way in providing options that may provide fewer risks to all involved NOTE Stay tuned for Part II of this story where we will talk more about the use of aerial fire apparatus as high point anchors in rescue operations read more Are You Sure You Don t Need On Air Rescue Practice Thursday August 28 2014 Reported by Dennis O Connell Director of Training After more than 25 years in the rescue industry I always cringe a bit when I hear rescue teams say they don t practice on air rescues because personnel at their facilities are not allowed to do planned work activities in IDLH or low O2 areas But I always ask what about the permit spaces that may have the potential for atmospheric hazards What about those spaces that may unexpectedly become IDLH or low O2 what then I have raised this flag many times before and according to NIOSH a little less than half the deaths from atmospheric conditions occurred in spaces that originally tested as being acceptable for entry Something happened unexpectedly and something went very wrong Remember OSHA states that a confined space simply has to have the potential for a hazardous atmosphere not that it is actually present as one of the triggers to make a space a permit required space and require rescue capabilities So for these unexpected instances do you really have the appropriate rescue response in place In our opinion not training your team to respond to IDLH emergencies is like buying a gun for home protection but not buying any bullets Also 1910 146 section k 1 i makes reference to 1910 134 OSHA s respiratory regulation Here OSHA talks about respiratory protection being worn by entrants as the trigger for standby rescue personnel capable of immediate action It is not necessarily based on the level of O2 It calls for rescue standby not rescue available Immediate action is called for not just a timely response OSHA Note to Paragraph k 1 i What will be considered timely will vary according to the specific hazards involved in each entry For example 1910 134 Respiratory Protection requires that employers provide a standby person or persons capable of immediate action to rescue employee s wearing respiratory protection while in work areas defined as IDLH atmospheres If that s not a hint as to how seriously OSHA takes the possibility of an IDLH atmosphere arising in a permit space I don t know what would be So if you don t think you ll ever need on air rescue capabilities take a look at this incident from a few years back The way this confined space fatality occurred and the possibility of it happening is a real eye opener It emphasizes the critical importance for considering all possible or potential hazards associated with confined space entry and rescue Folks what I m trying to say here is as rescuers we need to be prepared for the worst case scenario as well as the unexpected This is especially true when it comes to confined spaces When I hear We don t need on air practice because we don t allow IDLH entries at our facility Well neither did these guys Fatal Activation of CO2 Fire Protection System in Confined Space Sheffield Forgemasters was ordered to pay heavy fines and costs for safety failings that led to an employee dying of carbon dioxide poisoning after the cellar he was working in filled with the deadly gas A worker was found unconscious at the South Yorkshire foundry after a confined underground area swiftly flooded with the fire extinguishing mist Four of his co workers desperately tried to reach him but were themselves almost overcome by the fast acting gas The worker who had three grown up sons was pronounced dead on arrival at the hospital after the incident at the firm s plant on 30 May 2008 The Health and Safety Executive HSE investigated and prosecuted the company for serious safety failings On December 19th 2013 Sheffield Crown Court heard that on the morning of the incident the worker had carried out part of the cable cutting task in an electrical drawpit and then went to carry out the rest of the job in the switchroom cellar which was only accessible by lifting a manhole cover and dropping down a ladder Once underground at the electrical drawpit the worker used a petrol driven saw to cut through redundant 33 000 volt cables At some point he moved from there to the nearby switchroom cellar with the saw Later that morning colleagues heard the carbon dioxide CO2 warning alarms sounding from the cellar A supervisor and other workmates rushed to help with several of them trying to get down the ladder from the manhole to rescue the worker from the cellar s confines However all attempts were defeated as each worker struggled to breathe and remain conscious when exposed to the debilitating concentrated carbon dioxide The victim had to be brought to the surface later using slings HSE found that use of the petrol driven saw in the switchroom cellar had likely activated a smoke sensor and prompted the release of the carbon dioxide from the fire extinguishing system The court was told Sheffield Forgemasters had failed to provide any rescue equipment for either the cellar or the drawpit Other issues identified included a lack of a risk assessment by the firm for the cable cutting task and failing to provide a safe system of work in either underground location In addition there was no secure way to isolate the carbon dioxide fire system while work was going on in the cellar After the hearing a HSE Inspector said This was a very upsetting incident that resulted in the needless death of this employee It could have been an even worse tragedy as it was pure chance that another four workers who entered the cellar in a desperate bid to save their colleague did not also perish Exposure to between 10 15 of CO2 for more than a minute causes drowsiness and unconsciousness Exposure to 17 30 is fatal in less than one minute Carbon dioxide is poisonous even if there is an otherwise sufficient supply of oxygen The risks associated with confined spaces are well known in industry and there is an entire set of regulations dealing with controlling the risks associated with them Multiple fatalities do occur when one person gets into difficulty in such a space and then the rescuers are similarly overcome Sheffield Forgemasters had given no thought to the risks associated with the task being undertaken nor had they provided emergency rescue equipment This case shows how important it is for companies to effectively risk assess work activities looking at how the work will be carried out and in what circumstances read more Roco QUICK DRILL 4 Selecting the Proper Knot and Tying Correctly Wednesday August 13 2014 Being able to tie a knot in the classroom with a rope short vs selecting the proper knot and tying it correctly in the field during an emergency requires experience With a little imagination you can provide your team members numerous scenarios to practice in just a short period of time while they are still within a controlled environment This practice will help them to gain more experience that should pay off in the long run if needed during a real life emergency 1 Identify the knots your team uses and where they are used in various systems 2 Lay out a series of applications where team members would need to tie a knot Decide in advance what knots are acceptable in these applications since many times more than one knot may get the job done 3 Once you have established the acceptable knots lay out a gauntlet of knot tying stations 4 Each team member will go through each station first deciding which knot to use and then tying it as it would be used in the application examples end knot in a lower line vertical bridle knot lashing a backboard adjustable anchor self equalizing anchor etc The goal is to have team members choose an appropriate knot tie it correctly and apply it properly based on the rescue system presented Two examples for knot stations are 1 Backboard lashing have the lashing complete except for the knot at the end and 2 Mainline rigged

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/TECHNIQUES/ (2016-02-15)
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  • RescueTalk™
    the controlling contractor and all entry employers coordinate their activities when multiple entry employers have entrants in the same space or when other activities around the permit space may create a hazard that affects the confined space entry operation At the completion of entry operations it is equally important that all entities including entry employers and controlling contractors communicate information regarding the particulars of any given entry This information must include the permit space program followed during the entry operation as well as any hazards confronted or created during entry Of particular importance is to communicate any hazards created within the confined space that may still be in place The controlling contractor in turn communicates all of this information to the host employer 3 Requires a Competent Person to evaluate the work site and identify confined spaces including permit spaces Along with the increased need for strong communications and coordination the addition of the role of competent person for confined spaces may be one of the most important differences between the general industry standard and the construction standard It may seem to be a subtle difference in the two standards requirements but now there is a specific role or an identified position for conducting an evaluation of the worksite to determine the presence of confined spaces a determination of the known or potential hazards associated with those confined spaces and that has the authority to eliminate the identified hazards The competent person for confined spaces must have a high degree of expertise in identifying confined spaces and to make an accurate determination of the nature of any known or potential hazards associated with the confined space that would trigger it to be classified a permit space In the event that the configuration or use of a non permit required confined space changes or a new hazard is introduced the entry employer must have the competent person reevaluate that space to determine if it has become a permit required confined space This is also true for any confined space that may not have initially been adequately evaluated to identify any known or potential hazards that would require that space to be classified a permit required confined space 4 Designated rescue service must agree to notify the entry employer immediately if it becomes unavailable Although it has always been implied in the general industry standard that the entry supervisor would ensure the designated rescue service is available during entry operations 1926 1211 explicitly requires an employer to designate a rescue service in turn the rescue service agrees to notify the entry employer immediately if they become unavailable to respond 5 Provide an early warning system for non isolated engulfment hazards This is primarily for sanitary and storm drain entry operations but is equally important for any entry operations of a similar nature The type of early warning systems can be as simple as posting an individual as an upstream watch to more complex systems such as electronic sensors or camera systems Whatever system is used to detect an impending engulfment hazard it must include a means of communications to provide advanced warning to the downstream entrants in time to safely evacuate the space We encourage our readers to spend time studying the new regulation and in particular understanding the points we have highlighted in this article as well as in our downloadable Confined Spaces in Construction Safety Poster If you have questions or if we may be of service please contact us at 800 647 7626 read more Watch and Learn at Challenge 2015 Thursday July 30 2015 Take in all the action and discover what your team may be missing With Roco Rescue Challenge 2015 right around the corner we wanted to share some of the benefits of attending as an observer Here s what one of our observers had to say about last year s event You just can t get everything you need out of a classroom Coming out and seeing the teams performing different techniques and scenarios allowed us to gain insight that will be used to kick start our team Don t miss the rescue team event of the year Call us at 800 647 7626 and reserve your ticket today Rescue teams from across the country will participate in realistic confined space rescue exercises designed by Roco s top instructors And although Challenge is more of a learning event than a competition trophies will be awarded to the teams with top scores for individual skills proficiency and the infamous Yellow Brick Road rescue relay scenario Roco Rescue Challenge meets the annual rescue practice requirements of 1910 146 while providing realistic practice drills in all six confined space types Written documentation will be provided to each team following the event read more Do You Need Roco s Industrial Rescue III Training Thursday July 23 2015 If you ve been through a Roco class whether it was Roco certification to NFPA 1006 or OSHA compliance training our new Industrial Rescue III course can be the next step for you and your team This course will challenge students and rescue teams to solve real world confined space rescue scenarios building on previously learned skills while introducing new techniques for more complex confined space incidents This scenario based training will serve as annual compliance documentation NFPA OSHA for confirming rescue capabilities and skills proficiency in various confined space and elevated evolutions So if you re looking for the next step for you or your team check out Roco s Industrial Rescue III for advanced confined space rescue training states Dennis O Connell Chief Instructor and Director of Training read more OPPD Employees Go to Great Heights to Train for Rescues Monday July 20 2015 OPPD Omaha Public Power District rescue team members were put to the test by the elements and Roco instructors during a recent rescue class at their facility During the week long class they experienced high temperatures and rain all while working at varying heights However it

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/roco-rescue-blog/tag/TRAINING/ (2016-02-15)
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  • RescueTalk™
    cubic yard of soil can weigh as much as a car an unprotected trench can be an early grave OSHA s updated guide to Trenching and Excavation Safety highlights key elements of the applicable workplace standards and describes safe practices that employers can follow to protect workers from cave ins and other hazards A new section in the updated guide addresses safety factors that an employer should consider when bidding on a job Expanded sections describe maintaining materials and equipment used for worker protection systems as well as additional hazards associated with excavations Remember an unprotected trench can become an early grave Learn how to keep workers safe Download these OSHA Guides for details OSHA Guide to Trenching and Excavation Safety Trenching and Excavation Safety Fact Sheet read more Q A What are the Rescue Requirements for Trenches Excavations Tuesday May 19 2015 READER QUESTION One of our readers recently asked about rescue requirements in excavations We did some searching and found an interesting Letter of Interpretation LOI from OSHA that explains when rescue provisions are required during trenching operations ROCO TECH PANEL ANSWER The following is from OSHA LOI in regards to this answer In regard to whether emergency rescue equipment is required at every trenching job site located near or passing by a gas station refinery gas line sewer main etc please be advised by the following Emergency rescue equipment is required to be readily available where a competent person determines based on the conditions at each job site that hazardous atmospheric conditions exist or may reasonably be expected to develop during work in an excavation In regard to whether a contractor can rely on a local rescue squad instead of providing the rescue equipment please be advised that many emergency situations associated with the hazards involved with hazardous atmospheres in trenches would normally require an immediate response within a few minutes or even seconds A rescue squad would be unable to provide the necessary response and therefore could not be used to comply with 1926 651 g 2 As more and more industrial sites realize that just about every day somewhere on their property there is an open trench Trench collapses cause dozens of fatalities and hundreds of injuries each year Obviously this creates concerns especially for the rescue personnel who may be called to the scene during an emergency We ve been getting questions from clients that have effective rescue teams for medical hazmat fire confined space and rope but are realizing that they are lacking if a trench collapse occurs on their site Who will do the rescue is a question often asked There is concern by supervisors who have been given the responsibility for signing trench permits but have not had adequate training in trench and excavations Many are not competent persons as referenced in OSHA1926 651 652 After looking at the dozen of questions in the referenced LOI it should raise a few more Are the people you have signing off that a trench is constructed properly and safe for entry trained to know what to look for and have the authority to act competent person or are they assuming that the contractor is doing the right thing Who will be called if a trench emergency should occur Are their local resources that have the training and equipment to respond or are you an island unto yourself when it comes to trench rescue The link to the referenced LOI is shown below and the questions are still very relevant https www osha gov pls oshaweb owadisp show document p table INTERPRETATIONS p id 20597 Additional Resources OSHA Technical Manual OSHA Trenching and Excavation Safety Trench Safety Poster An Unprotected Trench Is An Early Grave read more Trench Training A Careful Balance Between Realism and Safety Tuesday March 12 2013 by Dennis O Connell Director of Training Chief Instructor This IPhone video captured at a recent training exercise is being posted here solely to illustrate the powerful nature of a trench collapse Instructors were aware that a collapse was imminent and a safe zone was established along with other measures that will be discussed in this article It s important to note that all students were cleared from the area prior to releasing the struts for the collapse This video is presented with the intention of helping trainers and rescuers achieve greater safety awareness during training events You ve probably heard the saying train as you play and play as you train many times However for rescuers this training mentality is essential Rescuers should have the ability to handle a wide variety of events but must also appreciate the dangers of the job Realism is the key to effective training and prepares rescuers both physically and mentally The more demanding and technical the rescue the more important it is to simulate the appropriate skills as closely as possible This realism during training will help rescuers understand what to expect during a real rescue This behavior needs to be practiced but must also be balanced with safety as the 1 priority To avoid injuries a risk analysis must be conducted and carefully reviewed This will help in planning the training exercises and in determining possible hazards where students may be most at risk Everyone involved in the training exercises including observers should be informed of the dangers as well as control measures and safety requirements Everyone should be aware that they have the ability to stop an evolution immediately should a safety concern be detected In order for this to happen an established rescue plan should be devised for each element of training An example in high angle training would be an instructor s line A designated instructor rescuer an additional line and equipment should be staged and ready for a rescue just in case Teaching stations should also be set up in close proximity to allow for the use of the equipment from one station to another In our quest for realism we need to constantly re evaluate as the training proceeds Risk vs reward is this training exercise worth the risk Now let s take a look at some common techniques used to increase pressure for rescuers and evaluate performance during a simulated rescue Time limits are often used to increase stress levels while performing skills In rope rescue training knot tying and patient packaging are good examples where time restraints are a useful tool On the other hand if you set time restraints or implement a speed reward for how fast you can rappel down a building or perform a rescue it can lead to unsafe actions that can cause injury or even death Here s a deadly example of speed rewards during training There was a video of tree trimmers taking their final exam In the video they were required to climb a ladder into a tree anchor themselves off and hook up to a rappel line rappel down to a simulated victim and then lower themselves to the ground In the video the student is being timed while being offered a reward for speed In the process of doing so the student missed a connection as did the instructor and fell to his death Another interesting means of rescuer stress or pressure that can develop unexpectedly during training is peer pressure In the same tape students can be heard encouraging for lack of a better word individuals to beat the clock If used in the correct manner this friendly competition can be useful but if not exercised properly it can be dangerous Competitive training exercises should be used only within the design of the class If it develops unexpectedly it should be shut down Otherwise it can quickly create a dangerous learning environment Again the instructor needs to keep the safety of the students in mind and evaluate all potential consequences Span of control is the number of people one can effectively manage The more technical or hands on a training course is the smaller the number of people a single instructor can safely control In rope training techniques and teaching may occur at multiple levels on a structure For example pick off techniques or patient packaging in a simulated confined space rescue exercise Certain techniques may require additional instructors at various levels to monitor students going over an edge and at the pick off level Or with a confined space scenario it may require an additional instructor to be physically located in the space to make sure patient packaging connections are correct prior to raising or life loading the line Sometimes with in house training personnel can become complacent with double checking all systems or having that extra set of eyes from an uninvolved participant That s why it is so important that every training exercise is carefully planned and followed through in all areas When training a group of your peers it can often be difficult to prevent freelancing and to keep everyone on the same page A well planned training session will include a review of safety issues at the start every time The briefing should explain what will be covered and allowed or not allowed during the training This will help students to understand that it s more than just a play session and will hopefully reduce the temptation for freelance activities It s important for trainers and rescuers alike to watch this video The training is being conducted in a live trench which is definitely more realistic and more real world than setting trench panels between two containers It is also more dangerous The instructor ratio training and skills must be competent for the task Acceptable conditions must be re evaluated constantly and discussed between instructors In some cases like this one a dangerous condition can be presented when students remove trench panels and equipment This is the time to stop a class and halt all operations During this particular session there was a large crack or separation in the dirt which made the weight of the dirt unstable As you will see this caused the collapse of a large portion of the trench wall In this particular situation it was simply not worth trying to recover the trench panels at the cost of safety The students were informed of the danger how it was detected and how it could be resolved Just remember no piece of equipment or gear is worth injuring a student or instructor After everyone was informed of the danger of an impending collapse the decision was made to let the wall collapse and to video it as a learning tool for that class and future classes This video will give you a very clear picture of the speed and force that can occur in a trench collapse As you can see the proper precautions were taken during this exercise in order to demonstrate the incredible power of a trench collapse An emergency plan was developed A safety officer designated areas of safety as well as areas of dangers for students instructors and observers In order to maintain the stability of the opposing trench wall a decision was made to keep a couple of other trench panels in place A backhoe was used to slope sections of the trench and create a safe zone for the instructor to remove the struts which in turn let the wall collapse The force of the dirt was so powerful that it snapped a inch shore form panel and a 2 x 12 strongback like a toothpick What you won t get from the video is the sense of force or vibration that was felt when the trench wall collapsed It s something the students will take away from the training along with a much greater respect for the power of a trench wall collapse Again we stress that constant re evaluation of conditions during technical rescue training is critically important for the safety of all involved Instructors must have the ability to perceive any differences in the training environment or situation be able to identify unacceptable conditions and to take quick corrective action Students should also have the ability to stop a training evolution if they perceive danger or have concerns It s always best to stop and re check everything Many times it s as simple as letting the students know if they see something that they think is dangerous or not quite right or if they don t quite understand just yell STOP Summary This video is a great learning tool that illustrates what can happen during live trench training It dramatically demonstrates the speed and force of a trench wall collapse However it also affirms that with proper attention to the training environment and changing conditions injury can be avoided It s similar to personnel who have been exposed to swift water rescue in real world environments They take away a much greater respect for the power of moving water and it cannot be simulated in a swimming pool Or with high angle training while it s the same technique rappelling from height versus a one story building is a totally different experience As instructors we must develop training that will give our students the experience and skills needed to perform their jobs safely But we also need to keep them safe during training as well Use this video and the story behind it to emphasize safety and proper planning during training sessions It also helps us to realize that being a trainer or instructor comes with great responsibility For me it s a constant battle between two thoughts No one should get injured during training versus let no man s ghost return to say his training let him down The need to develop safety plans and perform risk analysis during training is an important part of our job as instructors and student safety is our 1 priority read more Trench Rescue A thinking game Monday December 12 2011 Roco Chief Instructor Randy Miller explains that trench collapse injuries and or death is way too common in civil construction and industrial maintenance projects The sluggish economy entices organizations to cut corners after all time is money This trend also extends to the homeowner and weekend warrior Rather than hiring a certified trained trench professional do it yourself or do it with the resources on hand seems the more practical This breeds disaster Miller explains REMEMBER It s not IF it s going to collapse again but WHEN it s going to collapse again Watch this new video on the importance of Trench Rescue Training where Miller describes hazards of trench work and offers 5 tips for safer trench rescue practices Five helpful tips for Trench rescue 1 Personal accountability Know where all your rescuers are at all times 2 Keep the area clear Often the first reaction in a trench collapse is to look which adds more weight on the sides of the trench increasing the likelihood of collapse 3 Work from a safe area Spread out the weight around the trench e g laying wood down around the trench before stepping near or around it 4 The best trench rescue is a non entry rescue If possible get the trapped victim to begin digging himself out by giving him the right tools right away This gives the victim something to focus on while first responders develop an action plan 5 Donʼt get in over your head If you are not trained wait Donʼt create more victims Miller urges all first responders EMS fire department police department and industrial rescue teams to receive at minimum an Awareness level of training in Trench Rescue First line supervisors are encouraged to advance to the Technician level training Roco offers a 20 hour Trench Rescue Technician training course read more Trench Warning from OSHA Monday October 10 2011 Two workers are killed every month in trench collapses Unprotected trenches are among the deadliest hazards in the construction industry and the loss of life is devastating Since 2003 more than 200 workers have died in trench cave ins and hundreds more have been seriously injured OSHA has three new guidance products to educate employers and workers about the hazards in trenching operations The new products include a fact sheet QuickCard and a poster that warns An Unprotected Trench is an Early Grave The three documents may be ordered in English and Spanish language versions from the Publications page of OSHA s web site See the news release for more information read more Trench Collapse Fatality Las Vegas NM Friday June 03 2011 What does getting struck by a pickup traveling 45 mph and being in the path of a trench wall collapse have in common The outcome is typically not going to be positive A six cubic yard section of trench wall that collapses into an 8 foot deep trench has the weight and speed of a full size pickup traveling 45 mph These forces are the reason why a proactive and compliant trench safety program is paramount to your safety as a worker or as a rescuer Unfortunately there was another tragic incident last week in Las Vegas New Mexico in which two workers were killed following a trench cave in Dirt buried 49 year old Frank Romero and 32 year old Gene Hern The men were installing sewer and water lines in the 8 to 10 foot deep trench City spokesperson Dave Romero says other workers frantically tried to dig the men out but didn t make it to them in time Hern and Romero were pronounced dead on the scene by medical officials This serves as another reminder of how important it is to be trained in the proper precautions and dangers of trenches and excavations Once it happens it s too late there s no time to prepare As a first responder be aware when this type work is going on in your district or response area don t take chances

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  • Search Results
    ABOUT CONTACT LOGIN LEARN TRAIN GEAR CSRT TACTICAL RESOURCES ABOUT CONTACT LOGIN Site Search Results WE DO RESCUE Thanks for looking Here s what we found for you 1 800 647 7626 LIKE FOLLOW SUBSCRIBE NEWS FEED Links OSHA NFPA

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  • Roco Course Descriptions
    Extensive hands on teaching stations and realistic problem solving confined space exercises will include on air simulated IDLH scenarios as well as high angle elevated rescue operations Participants will have the opportunity to practice their skills repeatedly prior to testing which includes individual skills proficiency scenario based performance evaluations and written exam Recertification is also an excellent means to ensure that individual skills proficiency requirements are met and documented in accordance with OSHA 1910 146 Students that re certify in both Confined Space and Rope Rescue will complete an additional 10 hours which includes rope ascension high lines and knot passing Roco certification is valid for two years OPEN ENROLLMENT DATES Confined Space Recertification May 9 11 2016 Confined Space Recertification Nov 14 16 2016 CONFINED SPACE ROPE RECERTIFICATION PREREQUISITE PREVIOUS ROCO CERTIFICATION 40 HRS FOUR 10 HR DAYS Early Regs 995 00 Late Regs 1095 00 Gov Discount 100 Student CONFINED SPACE RECERTIFICATION PREREQUISITE PREVIOUS ROCO CERTIFICATION 30 HRS THREE 10 HR DAYS Early Regs 895 0 Late Regs 995 00 Gov Discount 100 Student TRENCH RESCUE Certification to NFPA 1006 Trench Rescue PREREQUISITE NONE 30 HRS THREE 10 HR DAYS Early Regs 1 095 00 Late Regs 1 195 00 Gov Discount 50 Student This intense hands on 30 hour Trench Rescue course includes extensive field exercises designed to develop the knowledge and skills necessary for rescuers and rescue teams members to conduct trench rescue emergency shoring operations This course meets competent requirements for OSHA 1926 650 as well as NFPA1006 Chapter 8 Trench Rescue Professional Qualifications for Technical Rescuer I II OPEN ENROLLMENT DATES Trench Rescue Nov 2 4 2016 COURSE TOPICS Soil Typing Collapse Mechanics Risk Benefit Analysis Trench Collapse Action Plan Isolation Protective Systems Intersecting Trenches Non Intersecting Trenches Shoring Shielding Straight Trench Intersecting Trench Interpreting Tabulated Data Crush Syndrome Supplemental Shoring Mechanical Pneumatic Lifting Tools Release Victim from Soil Entrapment INDUSTRIAL RESCUE I II PREREQUISITE NONE 50 HRS FIVE 10 HR DAYS Early Regs 1 195 00 Late Regs 1 295 00 Gov Discount 100 Student This 50 hour course is designed for industrial and municipal rescuers who may be required to handle confined space and high angle rescues in industrial and offshore platform environments Industrial Rescue I II takes a very hands on approach to rescue training that provides the skills necessary to meet OSHA guidelines for a competent rescue team or rescue team member For courses conducted at our training facility participants will practice rescue operations from all six 6 confined space types These realistic scenarios can be used to document practice requirements required by OSHA 1910 146 Simulated rescues from IDLH type atmospheres that require the use of Supplied Air Respirators SAR SCBA will also be included Participants will be taught safe simple and proven techniques that will allow them to effectively perform confined space rescues from elevated vessels and towers This course also includes skills required to perform rescue in offshore platform environments as well as rescue from fall protection rescuing workers suspended from fall protection Classroom lecture will cover applicable OSHA ANSI and NFPA standards as well as Authorized Entrant Attendant and Supervisor training OPEN ENROLLMENT DATES Industrial Rescue I II April 25 29 2016 Industrial Rescue I II May 23 27 2016 Industrial Rescue I II June 20 24 2016 Industrial Rescue I II Aug 1 5 2016 Industrial Rescue I II Sept 12 16 2016 Industrial Rescue I II Oct 24 28 2016 Industrial Rescue I II Dec 12 16 2016 COURSE TOPICS Safety Precautions Regulations Overview Rope Analysis Equipment Knots Anchoring and Rigging Safety Line Belay Patient Packaging Mechanical Advantage Lowering Systems Hauling Systems Litter Rigging Low Point Raises Pick and Pivot Tripod Operations Rescue from Fall Protection Elevated Rescue Scenarios Confined Space Awareness Operations Breathing Apparatus SAR SCBA Confined Space Scenarios Non IDLH On Air Confined Space Scenarios IDLH INDUSTRIAL RESCUE III PREREQUISITE INDUSTRIAL I II OR ROCO CERTIFICATON LEVEL COURSE 40 HRS FOUR 10 HR DAYS Early Regs 1 195 00 Late Regs 1 295 00 Gov Discount 100 Student This predominantly scenario based course will challenge individual rescuers and teams in a wide variety of confined space and high angle rescue exercises With the addition of new and more advanced techniques students will enhance their skills and teamwork abilities in numerous practice scenarios As the problems progress in difficulty students get a feel for executing an entire rescue operation from start to finish By placing specific time limitations on each scenario Industrial Rescue III gives students the experience of working under pressure just as in a real emergency OPEN ENROLLMENT DATES Industrial Rescue III June 6 9 2016 Industrial Rescue III Sept 26 29 2016 Industrial Rescue III Nov 7 10 2016 For courses at the Roco Training Center or as the training location allows practice scenarios will be conducted in all six 6 confined space types as per OSHA criteria Using more complex scenarios including simulated IDLH atmospheres requiring the use of breathing air equipment SAR and SCBA this course will meet the minimum annual practice requirements of OSHA 1910 146 Scenarios will be graded for safety and efficiency by our professional instructors who will provide a debriefing of strengths and areas for improvement along with suggestions for enhancing effectiveness of operations Industrial Rescue III serves as compliance documentation for confirming rescue capabilities and skills proficiency in various confined space and elevated evolutions TEAM PERFORMANCE EVALUATIONS TPE PREREQUISITE NONE 30 HRS THREE 10 HR DAYS Roco Team Performance Evaluations TPE are designed to simulate the pressures of emergency response Confined space and elevated scenarios will be used to evaluate your team capabilities for safe timely and proficient rescue response Each scenario will be debriefed so that deficiencies can be identified and corrected For TPEs conducted at the Roco Training Center all six confined space types will be included For on site sessions available confined spaces located within the team s response area will be used for the evaluation Teams will be scored

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/course-descriptions (2016-02-15)
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  • Roco Rescue Open-Enrollment Schedule
    RESCUE TECH II Builds on skills learned in Rescue I Plus and provides NFPA 1006 Confined Space Rescue Technician Rescue Tech II Certification May 2 6 2016 Rescue Tech II Certification Oct 17 21 2016 FAST TRACK 80 Designed specifically for industrial rescue teams and offers Roco s Confined Space Rescue Certification in eight days Fast Track 80 March 3 5 7 11 2016 Fast Track 80 ProBoard by LSU FETI March 3 5 7 11 2016 Fast Track 80 May 12 14 16 20 2016 Fast Track 80 ProBoard by LSU FETI May 12 14 16 20 2016 Fast Track 80 Sept 22 24 26 30 2016 Fast Track 80 ProBoard by LSU FETI Sept 22 24 26 30 2016 ROCO RESCUE CHALLENGE October 12 13 2016 Rescue teams from across the country will participate in realistic confined space rescue exercises designed by Roco s top instructors FAST TRACK 120 Completes the Confined Space Rescue Rope Rescue skill requirements of NFPA 1006 Level II and NFPA 1670 Technician Level Fast Track 120 April 4 9 11 16 2016 Fast Track 120 Aug 8 13 15 20 2016 Albuquerque NM Fast Track 120 Nov 28 Dec 3 5 10 2016 Tech Recertification Recertification of Rescue Technician skills based on the requirements of NFPA 1006 Confined Space Recertification May 9 11 2016 Confined Space Recertification Nov 14 16 2016 Confined Space Rope Recertification May 9 12 2016 Confined Space Rope Recertification Nov 14 17 2016 Trench Rescue Certification to NFPA 1006 Trench Rescue Trench Rescue Nov 2 4 2016 Industrial Rescue I II Confined space and high angle rescue in industry and offshore platform environments Industrial Rescue I II April 25 29 2016 Industrial Rescue I II May 23 27 2016 Industrial Rescue I II June 20 24 2016 Industrial Rescue

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/open-enrollment-schedule (2016-02-15)
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  • Roco Training Center RTC
    32 000 square foot structure built of stacked off set shipping containers The unique design creates a confined space training maze that can be modified and changed to challenge the most experienced responders The inner courtyard and tower provide an excellent area to learn the latest Fall Protection techniques as well as Tower Work and Rescue With three classrooms and numerous field stations students have many areas to practice their skills RTC offers a multitude of confined space and high angle rescue scenarios including all six confined space types based on the criteria found in OSHA 1910 146 Rescue teams can meet their minimum annual practice requirements in all six confined space types while working in a safe and controlled learning environment Flexibility Keeps Rescue Training Fresh The ability to simulate various types and complexities of confined space incidents as well as being able to modify the prop keeps rescuers coming back year after year The facility provides an excellent place for seasoned teams to meet their practice and drill requirements Refresher training is designed to knock the rust off We try to throw the worst case situations at our returning rescue teams because if you can do the worst

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/rtc (2016-02-15)
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  • Private Training Quote
    interested in Private Training at Designated Site Special Training at Roco Training Center Stand by Rescue Services CSRT Other Please explain your needs Earliest date to schedule Completion date PHONE WORK ADDRESS CITY STATE ZIP COUNTRY Select Country AFGHANISTAN ALAND ISLANDS ALBANIA ALGERIA AMERICAN SAMOA ANDORRA ANGOLA ANGUILLA ANTARCTICA ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA ARGENTINA ARMENIA ARUBA AUSTRALIA AUSTRIA AZERBAIJAN BAHAMAS BAHRAIN BANGLADESH BARBADOS BELARUS BELGIUM BELIZE BENIN BERMUDA BHUTAN BOLIVIA BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA BOTSWANA BOUVET ISLAND BRAZIL BRITISH INDIAN OCEAN TERRITORY BRUNEI DARUSSALAM BULGARIA BURKINA FASO BURUNDI CAMBODIA CAMEROON CANADA CAPE VERDE CAYMAN ISLANDS CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC CHAD CHILE CHINA CHRISTMAS ISLAND COCOS KEELING ISLANDS COLOMBIA COMOROS CONGO CONGO THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE COOK ISLANDS COSTA RICA CÔTE D IVOIRE CROATIA CUBA CYPRUS CZECH REPUBLIC DENMARK DJIBOUTI DOMINICA DOMINICAN REPUBLIC ECUADOR EGYPT EL SALVADOR EQUATORIAL GUINEA ERITREA ESTONIA ETHIOPIA FALKLAND ISLANDS MALVINAS FAROE ISLANDS FIJI FINLAND FRANCE FRENCH GUIANA FRENCH POLYNESIA FRENCH SOUTHERN TERRITORIES GABON GAMBIA GEORGIA GERMANY GHANA GIBRALTAR GREECE GREENLAND GRENADA GUADELOUPE GUAM GUATEMALA GUERNSEY GUINEA GUINEA BISSAU GUYANA HAITI HEARD ISLAND AND MCDONALD ISLANDS HOLY SEE VATICAN CITY STATE HONDURAS HONG KONG HUNGARY ICELAND INDIA INDONESIA IRAN ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF IRAQ IRELAND ISRAEL ITALY JAMAICA JAPAN JERSEY JORDAN KAZAKHSTAN KENYA KIRIBATI KOREA DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE S REPUBLIC OF KOREA REPUBLIC OF KUWAIT KYRGYZSTAN LAO PEOPLE S DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC LATVIA LEBANON LESOTHO LIBERIA LIBYAN ARAB JAMAHIRIYA LIECHTENSTEIN LITHUANIA LUXEMBOURG MACAO MACEDONIA THE FORMER YUGOSLAV REPUBLIC OF MADAGASCAR MALAWI MALAYSIA MALDIVES MALI MALTA MARSHALL ISLANDS MARTINIQUE MAURITANIA MAURITIUS MAYOTTE MEXICO MICRONESIA FEDERATED STATES OF MOLDOVA REPUBLIC OF MONACO MONGOLIA MONTENEGRO MONTSERRAT MOROCCO MOZAMBIQUE MYANMAR NAMIBIA NAURU NEPAL NETHERLANDS NETHERLANDS ANTILLES NEW CALEDONIA NEW ZEALAND NICARAGUA NIGER NIGERIA NIUE NORFOLK ISLAND NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS NORWAY OMAN PAKISTAN PALAU PALESTINIAN TERRITORY OCCUPIED PANAMA PAPUA NEW GUINEA PARAGUAY PERU PHILIPPINES PITCAIRN POLAND PORTUGAL

    Original URL path: http://www.rocorescue.com/get_quote (2016-02-15)
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