archive-com.com » COM » R » ROUGHGUIDES.COM

Total: 1603

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Shopping | About China | Rough Guides
    sale at eighty percent of its original price At markets you re expected to bargain for goods unless prices are displayed If you can speak Chinese hang around for a while to get an idea what others are paying or just ask at a few stalls selling the same things Chinese shoppers usually state the price they re willing to pay rather than beginning low and working up to it after haggling Don t become obsessed about saving every last yuan being charged more than locals and getting ripped off from time to time is inevitable Souvenirs popular with foreign tourists include chops stone seals with your name engraved in characters on the base all manner of reproduction antiques from porcelain to furniture mementos of Mao and the Cultural Revolution Little Red Books and cigarette lighters that chime The East is Red T shirts and old style Chinese clothes scroll paintings and ethnic jewellery and textiles Chinese tourists also look for things like local teas purple sand teapots and bright tack Pretty much the same selection is sold at all tourist sites irrespective of relevancy For real antiques you need specialist stores or markets some are listed in the Guide where anything genuine is meant to be marked with a wax seal and requires an export licence to take out of the country But be aware that with world prices for Chinese art going through the roof forgeries abound The Chinese are also clued up avid collectors and value their culture highly so don t expect to find any bargains Clothes are a very good deal in China with brand stores such as Giordano Baleno Metersbonwe and Yishion selling high quality smart casual wear Fashion conscious places such as Shanghai and Hong Kong also have factory outlet stores selling last

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/china/shopping/ (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Children | About China | Rough Guides
    Northwest Tibet Shop Ebooks Travel Insurance Hostels Children Show Related Guides Hide Related Guides The Yangzi Basin Rough Guides Snapshot China View Guide The Rough Guide to Beijing View Guide The Rough Guide to China View Guide Tibet Rough Guides Snapshot China View Guide The Rough Guide to Shanghai View Guide The Rough Guide to Southwest China View Guide The Yellow River Rough Guides Snapshot China View Guide Pocket Rough Guide Hong Kong Macau View Guide The Rough Guide to Nepal View Guide The Rough Guide to Thailand View Guide China Children Children in China are thanks to the one child policy usually indulged and pampered and foreigners travelling with children can expect to receive lots of attention from curious locals and the occasional admonition that the little one should be wrapped up warmer While formula and nappies might be available in modern big city supermarkets elsewhere you ll need to bring a supply and any medication if required with you local kids don t use nappies just pants with a slit at the back and when baby wants to go mummy points him at the gutter Similarly changing facilities and baby minding services are virtually unknown on the mainland outside high end international hotels Hong Kong is the only part of China where children are specifically catered to by attractions such as Ocean World and Disneyland elsewhere the way that most Chinese tourist sites are decked up like fairground rides makes them attractive for youngsters in any case Things to watch for include China s poor levels of hygiene keeping infants and toddlers hands clean can be a full time occupation spicy or just unusual food plus the stress levels caused by the ambient crowds pollution and noise found in much of the country though this often seems to

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/china/children/ (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The media | About China | Rough Guides
    the problem Stories about corrupt local officials armed confrontations between developers and peasants being forced off their land or the appalling conditions of coal mine workers do occasionally get through the net though both journalists and editors take a risk reporting such things several doing so have been jailed for revealing state secrets or even beaten to death by the thugs they were trying to expose Newspapers and magazines The national Chinese language newspaper is the People s Daily with an online English edition at english peopledaily com cn though all provincial capitals and many major cities produce their own dailies with a local slant The only national English language newspaper is the China Daily chinadaily com cn which is scarce outside big cities Hong Kong s English language media includes the locally produced newspapers the South China Morning Post and the Standard published alongside regional editions of Time Newsweek the Asian Wall Street Journal and USA Today These have so far remained openly critical of Beijing on occasion despite the former colony s changeover to Chinese control Most big cities including Beijing Shanghai Kunming Chengdu and Chongqing have free English language magazines aimed at expats containing listings of local venues and events plus classifieds and feature articles they re monitored by the authorities though this doesn t stop them sailing quite close to the wind at times Television and radio Chinese television comprises a dozen or so channels run by the state television company CCTV plus a host of regional stations not all channels are available across the country Most of the content comprises news flirty game shows travel and wildlife documentaries soaps and historical dramas and bizarre song and dance extravaganzas featuring performers in fetishistic tight fitting military outfits entertaining party officials with rigor mortis faces Tune in

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/china/media/ (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Travel essentials | About China | Rough Guides
    blood and dirty needles Hepatitis symptoms include yellowing of the eyes and skin preceded by lethargy fever and pains in the upper right abdomen Typhoid and cholera are spread by contaminated food or water generally in localized epidemics both are serious conditions and require immediate medical help Symptoms of typhoid include headaches high fever and constipation followed by diarrhoea in the later stages The disease is infectious Cholera begins with sudden but painless onset of watery diarrhoea later combined with vomiting nausea and muscle cramps Rapid dehydration rather than the infection itself is the main danger and should be treated with constant oral rehydration solutions Summer outbreaks of malaria and dengue fever occur across southern China usually in localized areas Symptoms are similar severe headaches joint pains fever and shaking though a rash might also appear with dengue There s no cure for dengue fever whereas malaria can be prevented and controlled with medication both require immediate medical attention to ensure that there are no complications You can minimize your chances of being bitten by mosquitoes in the first place by wearing light coloured full length clothing and insect repellent in the evenings when mosquitoes are active In tropical China the temperature and humidity can take a couple of weeks to adjust to High humidity can cause heat rashes prickly heat and fungal infections Prevention and cure are the same wear loose clothes made of natural fibres wash frequently and dry off thoroughly afterwards Talcum or anti fungal powder and the use of mild antiseptic soap help too Don t underestimate the strength of the sun in the tropics desert regions such as Xinjiang or high up on the Tibetan Plateau Sunscreen is not always easily available in China and local stuff isn t always of sufficiently high quality anyway Signs of dehydration and heatstroke include a high temperature lack of sweating a fast pulse and red skin Reducing your body temperature with a lukewarm shower will provide initial relief Plenty of places in China Tibet and the north in particular also get very cold Watch out here for hypothermia where the core body temperature drops to a point that can be fatal Symptoms are a weak pulse disorientation numbness slurred speech and exhaustion To prevent the condition wear lots of layers and a hat eat plenty of carbohydrates and stay dry and out of the wind To treat hypothermia get the victim into shelter away from wind and rain give them hot drinks but not alcohol and easily digestible food and keep them warm Serious cases require immediate hospitalization High altitude in regions such as Tibet and parts of Xinjiang Sichuan and Yunnan prevents the blood from absorbing oxygen efficiently and can lead to altitude sickness also known as AMS acute mountain sickness Most people feel some symptoms above 3500m which include becoming easily exhausted headaches shortness of breath sleeping disorders and nausea they re intensified if you ascend to altitude rapidly for instance by flying direct from coastal cities to Lhasa Relaxing for the first few days drinking plenty of water and taking painkillers will ease symptoms Having acclimatized at one altitude you should still ascend slowly or you can expect the symptoms to return If for any reason the body fails to acclimatize to altitude serious conditions can develop including pulmonary oedema characterized by severe breathing trouble a cough and frothy white or pink sputum and cerebral oedema causing severe headaches loss of balance other neurological symptoms and eventually coma The only treatment for these is rapid descent in Tibet this means flying out to Kathmandu or Chengdu without delay You also need to see a doctor as soon as possible Hospitals clinics and pharmacies Medical facilities in China are best in major cities with large expat populations where there are often high standard clinics and the hotels may even have resident doctors Elsewhere larger cities and towns have hospitals and for minor complaints there are plenty of pharmacies that can suggest remedies though don t expect English to be spoken Chinese hospitals use a mix of Western and traditional Chinese medicine approaches and sometimes charge high prices for simple drugs and use procedures that aren t necessary they ll put you on a drip just to administer antibiotics so always ask for a second opinion from a Western trained doctor if you re worried your embassy should be able to recommend one if none is suggested in the Guide In an emergency you re better off taking a cab than waiting for an ambulance it s quicker and will work out much cheaper There s virtually no free health care in China even for its citizens expect to pay around 500 as a consultation fee Pharmacies are marked by a green cross and if you can describe your ailment or required medication you ll find many drugs which would be restricted and expensive in the West are easily available over the counter for very little money Be wary of counterfeit drugs however check for spelling mistakes in the packaging or instructions Medical resources for travellers In the UK and Ireland MASTA Medical Advisory Service for Travellers Abroad UK masta travel health com Fifty clinics across the UK Tropical Medical Bureau Republic of Ireland tmb ie In the US and Canada Canadian Society for International Health csih org Extensive list of travel health centres in Canada CDC cdc gov Official US government public health agency with good travel health information International Society for Travel Medicine istm org A full list of clinics worldwide specializing in travel health In Australia New Zealand and South Africa Netcare Travel Clinics www travelclinic co za Travel clinics in South Africa Travellers Medical Vaccination Centre tmvc com au Website lists travellers medical and vaccination centres throughout Australia and New Zealand Insurance China is a relatively safe place to travel though traffic accidents respiratory infections petty theft and transport delays are all fairly common occurrences meaning that it s sensible to ensure you ve arranged some form of travel insurance before leaving home Internet Internet bars 网吧 wăngbā with high speed connections are everywhere in China from big cities where some seat hundreds of people to rural villages They re invariably full of network gaming teenagers and charge 2 5 per hour Having said this since 2010 you ve been required to show a Chinese ID card before being allowed to use a net bar obviously impossible for most tourists In some places this rule is strictly enforced elsewhere nobody cares or you ll be handed a fake ID at the front counter which will allow you to sign on It s best not to rely on them all large hotels have business centres where you can get online but this is expensive especially in the classier places around 30 hr Better value are the backpacker hostels where getting online costs around 5 hr or is free But the best deal is to tote a laptop tablet or phone major cities have cafés with free wi fi while almost all youth hostels and major hotels have it too though the latter may charge you through the nose hotels also often feature ADSL sockets in their rooms In an attempt to keep control of news and current affairs China s internet censors have set up the dryly named Great Firewall or Net Nanny which blocks access to any websites deemed undesirable by the state currently including Twitter YouTube and Facebook To get around it you need to use a web proxy or VPN Virtual Private Network such as WiTopia Hotspot Shield or UltraSurf all of which cost a few pounds a month and offer a free limited period trial This is illegal but the government pays no attention to foreigners who do this just about every foreign business in China runs a VPN For Chinese nationals it s a different matter and you will never find a public computer such as in a hotel or business centre running one Laundry Big city hotels and youth hostels all over offer a laundry service for anything between 10 and 100 alternatively some hostels have self service facilities or you can use your room sink every corner store in China sells washing powder Otherwise ask at accommodation either for the staff to wash your clothes or for the nearest laundry where they usually charge by dry weight Laundromats are virtually unknown in China Living in China It is becoming increasingly easy for foreigners to live in China full time whether as a student a teacher or for work Anyone planning to stay more than six months is required to pass a medical from approved clinics proving that they don t have any venereal disease if you do have a VD expect to be deported and your passport endorsed with your ailment Many mainland cities including Beijing Shanghai Guangzhou Kunming and Chengdu have no restrictions on where foreigners can reside though either you or your landlord must register with the local PSB Property rental is relatively inexpensive if you avoid purpose built foreign enclaves The easiest way to find accommodation is to go through an agent who will generally charge one month s rent as a fee There are plenty who advertise in expat magazines and online Teaching There are schemes in operation to place foreign teachers in Chinese educational institutions contact your nearest Chinese embassy for details Some employers ask for a TEFL qualification though a degree or simply the ability to speak the language as a native is usually enough The standard teaching salary for a foreigner though this is heavily dependent on your location in China is around 5500 per month for a bachelor s degree 7500 for a master s degree and 10 000 for a doctorate This isn t enough to put much away but you should also get subsidized on campus accommodation plus a fare to your home country one way for a single semester and a return for a year s work The workload is usually fourteen hours a week and if you work a year you get paid through the winter holiday Most teachers find their students keen hard working curious and obedient and report that it is the contact with them that makes the experience worthwhile That said avoid talking about religion or politics in the classroom as this can get them into trouble You ll earn more say 12 000 a month in a private school though be aware of the risk of being ripped off by a commercial agency you might be given more classes to teach than you d signed up for for example Check out the institution thoroughly before committing yourself Studying Many universities in China now host substantial populations of Western students especially in Beijing Shanghai and Xi an Indeed the numbers of foreigners at these places are so large that in some ways you re shielded from much of a China experience and you may find smaller centres offer both a mellower pace of life and more contact with Chinese outside the campus Most foreign students come to China to study Mandarin though there are many additional options available from martial arts to traditional opera or classical literature once you break the language barrier Courses cost from the equivalent of US 2400 a year or US 800 a semester Hotel style campus accommodation costs around US 10 a day most people move out as soon as they speak enough Chinese to rent a flat Your first resource is the nearest Chinese embassy which can provide a list of contact details for Chinese universities offering the courses you are interested in most universities also have English language websites Be aware however that promotional material may have little bearing on what is actually provided Though teaching standards themselves are high at Chinese universities the administration departments are often confused or misleading places Ideally visit the campus first and be wary of paying course fees up front until you ve spoken to a few students Working There is plenty of work available for foreigners in mainland Chinese cities where a whole section of expat society gets by as actors cocktail barmen Chinglish correctors models freelance writers and so on To really make any money here however you need either to be employed by a foreign company or start your own business China s vast markets and WTO membership present a wealth of commercial opportunities for foreigners However anyone wanting to do business here should do thorough research beforehand The difficulties are formidable red tape and shady business practices abound Remember that the Chinese do business on the basis of mutual trust and pay much less attention to contractual terms or legislation Copyright and trademark laws are often ignored and any successful business model will be immediately copied You ll need to develop your guanxi connections assiduously and cultivate the virtues of patience propriety and bloody mindedness Study and work programmes AFS Intercultural Programs afs org Intercultural exchange organization whose China offerings include academic and cultural exchanges that are anywhere from one month to a year long Council on International Educational Exchange CIEE ciee org Leading NGO offering study programmes and volunteer projects around the world China options include an academic semester or year abroad a gap year US students only summer study and paid teaching for a semester or year Mail The Chinese mail service is fast and efficient with letters taking a day to reach destinations in the same city two or more days to other destinations in China and up to several weeks to destinations abroad Overseas postage rates are fairly expensive and vary depending on weight destination and where you are in the country The International Express Mail Service EMS however is unreliable with items often lost in transit or arriving in pieces despite registered delivery and online tracking DHL dhl com available in a few major cities is a safer bet Main post offices are open daily usually from 8am 8pm smaller offices may keep shorter hours or close at weekends As well as at post offices you can post letters in green postboxes though these are rare outside big cities To send parcels turn up with the goods you want to send and the staff will sell you a box and pack them in for 15 or so Once packed but before the parcel is sealed it must be checked at the customs window and you ll have to complete masses of paperwork so don t be in a hurry If you are sending valuable goods bought in China put the receipt or a photocopy of it in with the parcel as it may be opened for customs inspection farther down the line Maps Street maps for almost every town and city in China are available from kiosks hotel shops and bookshops Most are in Chinese only showing bus routes hotels restaurants and tourist attractions local bus train and flight timetables are often printed on the back as well The same vendors also sell pocket sized provincial road atlases again in Chinese only Some of the major cities and tourist destinations also produce English language maps available at upmarket hotels principal tourist sights or tour operators offices In Hong Kong and Macau the local tourist offices provide free maps which are adequate for most visitors needs Countrywide maps which you should buy before you leave home include the excellent 1 4 000 000 map from GeoCenter which shows relief and useful sections of all neighbouring countries and the Collins 1 5 000 000 map One of the best maps of Tibet is Stanfords Map of South Central Tibet Kathmandu Lhasa Route Map Money The mainland Chinese currency is formally called yuan more colloquially known as renminbi RMB literally the people s money or kuai One yuan breaks down into ten jiao also known as mao Paper money was invented in China and is still the main form of exchange available in 100 50 20 10 5 and 1 notes with a similar selection of mao One mao five mao and 1 coins are increasingly common though less so in rural areas China suffers regular outbreaks of counterfeiting many people check their change for watermarks metal threads and the feel of the paper The yuan floats within a narrow range set by a basket of currencies keeping Chinese exports cheap much to the annoyance of the US At the time of writing the exchange rate was approximately 6 1 to US 1 9 5 to 1 8 2 to 1 5 9 to CAN 1 5 5 to AU 1 4 9 to NZ 1 and 0 6 to ZAR1 For exact rates check www xe com Hong Kong s currency is the Hong Kong dollar HK divided into one hundred cents while in Macau they use pataca usually written MOP in turn broken down into 100 avos Both currencies are worth slightly less than the yuan but while Hong Kong dollars are accepted in Macau and southern China s Special Economic Zones and can be exchanged internationally neither yuan nor pataca is any use outside the mainland or Macau respectively Tourist hotels in Beijing Shanghai and Guangzhou also sometimes accept payment in Hong Kong or US dollars Banks and ATMs Banks in major Chinese cities are sometimes open seven days a week though foreign exchange is usually only available Monday to Friday approximately 9am noon and 2 5pm All banks are closed for the first three days of the Chinese New Year with reduced hours for the following eleven days and at other holiday times In Hong Kong banks are generally open Monday to Friday from 9am to 4 30pm until 12 30pm on Saturday while in Macau they close thirty minutes earlier Cirrus Visa and Plus cards can be used to make cash withdrawals from ATMs operated by the Bank of China the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China China

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/china/travel-essentials/ (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Things not to miss in China | Photo Gallery | Rough Guides
    Introduction China Cambodia India Indonesia Japan Laos Malaysia Nepal Myanmar Burma Philippines Singapore South Korea Sri Lanka Taiwan Thailand Vietnam See all destinations China Overview Introduction Where to go When to go Festivals Fact file Getting there Getting around Accommodation Food and drink Culture and etiquette Sport and outdoor activities Shopping Children The media Travel essentials Inspiration Things not to miss Itineraries Features Gallery Explore Beijing and around Hebei and

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/china/things-miss/ (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • China Itineraries | Rough Guides
    galloping across the plains on a tiny steed 4 Shapotou See the mighty Yellow River flowing smoothly between desert dunes at this tiny remote resort town in up country rural Ningxia a spellbinding sight 5 Lanzhou Slurp down outstanding beef noodles at this former garrison town along the fabled Silk Road the gateway to China s Muslim northwest 6 Jiayuguan The fortress at the Great Wall s western extremity over 2000km from Beijing impressive for its mighty defences yet dwarfed by the stark desert scenery 7 Dunhuang Ride a camel across 300m high dunes outside this small city then explore the marvellous galleries of ancient Buddhist sculptures at the Mogao caves 8 Turpan Small relaxed oasis town with a main street shaded by grape trellises and a surrounding desert packed with historical relics from its former Silk Road heyday 9 Kashgar Frontier city where Chinese Uyghur and Central Asian cultures mix don t miss the astonishing Sunday Bazaar crammed with metalwork spices and livestock traders This tour ticks the major boxes historical sights gorgeous countryside and sizzling cities Allow two weeks in a hurry or three at a more leisurely pace 1 Beijing The Chinese capital is packed with essential sights including the Forbidden City the Summer Palace and the Great Wall 2 Pingyao Step back in time inside the walls of this charming traffic free Ming dynasty town spending the night at a traditional courtyard inn 3 Xi an Dynastic capital for a millennium Xi an is filled with treasures including the enigmatic Terracotta Army built to guard the tomb of China s despotic first emperor 4 Chengdu The Sichuanese capital features traditional teahouses fire breathing opera lively temples and locally bred pandas 5 Three Gorges Take a three day cruise down this impressive stretch of the mighty Yangtze

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/china/itineraries/ (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Beijing and around Guide | China Travel | Rough Guides
    So great a number of houses and of people no man could tell the number I believe there is no place in the world to which so many merchants come and dearer things and of greater value and more strange come into this town from all sides than to any city in the world The wealth came from the city s position on the Silk Road and Polo described over a thousand carts loaded with silk arriving almost each day ready for the journey west out of China And it set a precedent in terms of style and grandeur for the Khans later known as emperors with Kublai building himself a palace of astonishing proportions walled on all sides and approached by great marble stairways The Ming dynasty With the accession of the Ming dynasty who defeated the Mongols in 1368 the capital temporarily shifted to present day Nanjing but Yongle the second Ming emperor returned building around him prototypes of the city s two greatest monuments the Imperial Palace and Temple of Heaven It was in Yongle s reign too that the basic city plan took shape rigidly symmetrical extending in squares and rectangles from the palace and inner city grid to the suburbs much as it is today The Qing dynasty Subsequent post Ming history is dominated by the rise and eventual collapse of the Manchus northerners who ruled China as the Qing dynasty from 1644 to the beginning of the twentieth century Beijing as the Manchu capital was at its most prosperous in the first half of the eighteenth century the period in which the Qing constructed the legendary Summer Palace the world s most extraordinary royal garden with two hundred pavilions temples and palaces and immense artificial lakes and hills to the north of the city With the central Imperial Palace this was the focus of endowment and the symbol of Chinese wealth and power However in 1860 the Opium Wars brought British and French troops to the walls of the capital and the Summer Palace was first looted and then razed to the ground by the British Foreign empires arrive While the imperial court lived apart within what was essentially a separate walled city conditions for the civilian population in the capital s suburbs were starkly different Kang Youwei a Cantonese political reformer visiting in 1895 described this dual world No matter where you look the place is covered with beggars The homeless and the old the crippled and the sick with no one to care for them fall dead on the roads This happens every day And the coaches of the great officials rumble past them continuously The indifference rooted according to Kang in officials throughout the city spread from the top down From 1884 using funds meant for the modernization of the nation s navy the Empress Dowager Cixi had begun building a new Summer Palace of her own The empress s project was really the last grand gesture of imperial architecture and

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/china/beijing-around/ (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Hebei and Tianjin Guide | China Travel | Rough Guides
    Guide The Rough Guide to First Time Around The World View Guide The Rough Guide to Korea View Guide A somewhat anonymous region Hebei has two great cities at its heart Beijing and Tianjin both of which long ago outgrew the province and struck out on their own as separate municipalities In the south a landscape of flatlands is spotted with heavy industry and mining towns China at its least glamorous which are home to the majority of the province s seventy million inhabitants The sparsely populated tableland to the north rising from the Bohai Gulf holds more promise For most of its history this marked China s northern frontier and was the setting for numerous battles with invading forces both the Mongols and the Manchus swept through leaving their mark in the form of the Great Wall winding across lonely ridges The first sections of the wall were built in the fourth century AD along the Hebei Shanxi border in an effort to fortify its borders against aggressive neighbours Two centuries later Qin Shi Huang s Wall of Ten Thousand Li better known as the Great Wall skirted the northern borders of the province The parts of this barrier visible today however are the remains of the much younger and more extensive Ming dynasty structure begun in the fourteenth century as a deterrent against the Mongols You can see the wall where it meets the sea at Shanhaiguan a fortress town only a few hours by train from Beijing If you re in the area don t miss the intriguing seaside resort of Beidaihe along the coast to the south whose beaches host summer vacationers and dwindling numbers of Communist Party elite Well north of the wall the town of Chengde is the province s most visited attraction an

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/china/hebei-tianjin/ (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive



  •