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  • Travel Essentials | About Indonesia | Rough Guides
    Medan and several seaports including Padan Bai in Bali Tanjung Priok for Jakarta Pulau Batam and Pulau Bintam between Singapore and Sumatra and Medan on Sumatra If you re arriving in Indonesia through a more remote air or seaport check whether you need to obtain a visa from an Indonesian consulate in advance For a full list of official gateways see w www indonesianembassy org uk You can get a sixty day visa but only by applying in advance from an Indonesian consulate the cost is US 55 and the process takes three to five days though this varies from one consulate to the next A visa is most easily obtained in Singapore Penang or Kuala Lumpur Note that you must show your ticket out of the country when applying for a visa whether you re applying at the embassy or the port A visa can be extended once for up to 30 days for a fee of Rp250 000 this process also usually takes a few days When applying for an extension of your visa bring photocopies of the photo page in your passport your Indonesian visa and your flight ticket out of Indonesia Those entering the country via a non designated gateway must get a visa from an Indonesian consulate before travelling Further details on the latest situation can be found at w www indonesianembassy org uk HEALTH If you have a minor ailment head to a pharmacy apotik which can provide many medicines without prescription Condoms kondom are available from pharmacists and some convenience stores If you need an English speaking doctor doktor or dentist doktor gigi seek advice at your accommodation or at the local tourist office You ll find a public hospital rumah sakit in major cities and towns and in some places these are supplemented by private hospitals many of which operate an accident and emergency department If you have a serious accident or illness you will need to be evacuated home or to Singapore which has the best medical provision in Asia It is therefore vital to arrange health insurance before you leave home INFORMATION There s a range of tourist offices in Indonesia including government run organizations normally called Dinas or Kantor Pariwisata Diparda However many tourist information centres in Indonesia are little more than pamphlet outlets Good hostels are often the best sources of information INTERNET AND PHONE Aside from the usual services some post offices kantor pos now offer internet and fax facilities Indonesia s poste restante system is fairly efficient but only in the cities In larger post offices the parcels section is usually in a separate part of the building and sending one is expensive and time consuming The cheapest way of sending mail home is by surface under 10kg only Don t seal the parcel before staff at the post office have checked its contents in larger towns there is usually a parcel wrapping service near the post office To call abroad from Indonesia dial t 001

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/indonesia/travelessentials/ (2016-02-16)
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  • Festivals | About Indonesia | Rough Guides
    View Guide The Rough Guide to Southeast Asia On A Budget View Guide The Rough Guide to the Philippines View Guide The Rough Guide to Malaysia Singapore Brunei View Guide Tibet Rough Guides Snapshot China View Guide Pocket Rough Guide Hong Kong Macau View Guide The Rough Guide to Tokyo View Guide The Rough Guide to Bangkok View Guide Rough Guide Audio Phrasebook and Dictionary Japanese View Guide Indonesia Festivals In addition to national public holidays there are frequent religious festivals throughout Indonesia s Muslim Hindu Chinese and indigenous communities Each of Bali s twenty thousand temples has an anniversary celebration for instance and other ethnic groups may host elaborate marriages or funerals along with more secular holidays Many of these festivals change annually against the Western calendar Erau Festival Tenggarong Kalimantan September A big display of indigenous Dayak skills and dancing Funerals Tanah Toraja Sulawesi Mostly May to September With buffalo slaughter bullfights and sisemba kick boxing tournaments Galungun Bali Takes place for ten days every 210 days to celebrate the victory of good over evil Kasada Bromo East Java Offerings are made to the gods and thrown into the crater Held on the fourteenth day of Kasada the twelfth month in the Tenggerese calendar year Dec Krakatau Festival Lampung Sumatra October Five days of events highlighting Lampung s cultural heritage including Tuping Karnaval Lampung Mask Carnival part of the celebration occurs on the island of Anak Krakatau itself Nyepi Throughout Bali End of March or beginning of April The major purification ritual of the year Pasola West Sumba Held four times in February and March this festival to balance the upper sphere of the heavens culminates with a frenetic pitched battle between two villages of spear wielding horsemen Sekaten Central Java March or April The celebration of the

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  • Indonesia Facts | About Indonesia | Rough Guides
    To Miss Features Gallery Explore Java Sumatra Bali Lombok and the Gili Islands Sumbawa Komodo and Rinca Flores Sumba Kalimantan Sulawesi Shop Ebooks Travel Insurance Hostels Fact file Show Related Guides Hide Related Guides The Rough Guide to Bali Lombok View Guide The Rough Guide to Southeast Asia On A Budget View Guide Indonesia Rough Guides Snapshot Southeast Asia on a Budget View Guide Kansai Rough Guides Snapshot Japan View Guide Rough Guides Snapshot Vietnam Ho Chi Minh City View Guide The Rough Guide to Korea View Guide The Rough Guide to Singapore View Guide The Rough Guide to Tokyo View Guide The Rough Guide to Thailand s Beaches Islands View Guide The Rough Guide to Sri Lanka View Guide Indonesia Fact file Population 246 million Area 1 919 440 sq km Language Bahasa Indonesia Religions Islam majority plus Christian groups Hinduism animism and ancestor worship Currency Indonesian rupiah Rp Capital Jakarta International phone code t 62 Time zone GMT 7 9hr Bali is one hour ahead of Java Read More Things Not To Miss Explore Indonesia Features Gallery Where Next Check out Sulawesi Book a hostel in Indonesia Travel Offers Travel insurance Hotels Hostels Car hire Tours Explore Getting

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/indonesia/fact-file/ (2016-02-16)
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  • When to go to Indonesia | Rough Guides
    Asia On A Budget View Guide The Rough Guide to Bali Lombok View Guide Indonesia Rough Guides Snapshot Southeast Asia on a Budget View Guide The Rough Guide to Bangkok View Guide The Rough Guide to Taiwan View Guide The Rough Guide to Vietnam View Guide The Rough Guide to India View Guide The Rough Guide to Cambodia View Guide Kansai Rough Guides Snapshot Japan View Guide The Yellow River Rough Guides Snapshot China View Guide Indonesia When to go The whole archipelago is tropical with temperatures at sea level always between 21 C and 33 C although cooler in the mountains In theory the year divides into a wet and dry season though it s often hard to tell the difference Very roughly in much of the country November to April are the wet months Jan and Feb the wettest and May through to October are dry However in northern Sumatra this pattern is effectively reversed The peak tourist season but not necessarily the best time to visit is between mid June and mid September and again over the Christmas and New Year season This is particularly relevant in the major resorts where prices rocket and rooms can be

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/indonesia/when-to-go/ (2016-02-16)
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  • Where to go in Indonesia | Rough Guides
    View Guide Kansai Rough Guides Snapshot Japan View Guide The Rough Guide to Vietnam View Guide Indonesia Where to go Indonesia is ripe with highlights across the archipelago beginning in Medan on Sumatra s northeast coast From here the classic itinerary runs to the thick jungles and orang utan sanctuary at Bukit Lawang and down towards the lakeside resorts on Pulau Samosir in Southeast Asia s largest lake Danau Toba Further south the area around the laidback town of Bukittinggi appeals because of its flamboyant Minangkabau architecture the beautiful scenery around Danau Maninjau and the rafflesia reserves in the hills Many travellers then hurtle through to Java probably spending no more than a night in the traffic clogged capital Jakarta in their rush to the ancient cultural capital of Yogyakarta the best base for exploring the huge Borobudur Buddhist and Prambanan Hindu temples Java s biggest natural attractions are its volcanoes most famously Gunung Merapi on the outskirts of Yogya and East Java s Gunung Bromo where travellers brave a sunrise climb to the summit Just across the water from Java sits Bali the long time jewel in the crown of Indonesian tourism a tiny island of elegant temples verdant landscape and fine surf The biggest resorts are the party towns of Kuta and adjacent Legian with the more subdued beaches at Lovina and Candi Dasa appealing to travellers not hellbent on nightlife Most visitors also spend time in Bali s cultural centre Ubud whose lifeblood continues to be painting carving dancing and music making The islands east of Bali collectively known as Nusa Tenggara are now attracting bigger crowds particularly neighbouring Lombok with its beautiful beaches and temples East again the Komodo dragons draw travellers to Komodo and Rinca and then it s an easy hop across to Flores

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  • Things Not To Miss in Indonesia | Photo Gallery | Rough Guides
    Insurance Hostels Tours Car Rentals Follow Us Facebook Twitter Newsletter Log in Asia Introduction China Cambodia India Indonesia Japan Laos Malaysia Nepal Myanmar Burma Philippines Singapore South Korea Sri Lanka Taiwan Thailand Vietnam See all destinations Indonesia Overview Introduction Getting there Getting around Accommodation Food and drink Culture and etiquette Sports and outdoor activities Travel Essentials Festivals Fact file When to go Where to go Inspiration Things Not To Miss

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  • Sumatra Guide | Indonesia Travel | Rough Guides
    Related Guides Hide Related Guides The Rough Guide to Bali Lombok View Guide The Rough Guide to Southeast Asia On A Budget View Guide Indonesia Rough Guides Snapshot Southeast Asia on a Budget View Guide The Rough Guide to Southwest China View Guide Pocket Rough Guide Hong Kong Macau View Guide The Rough Guide to Shanghai View Guide Kyoto and Nara Rough Guides Snapshot Japan View Guide The Rough Guide to Thailand View Guide The Yangzi Basin Rough Guides Snapshot China View Guide The Rough Guide to Taiwan View Guide Sumatra offers a breath of fresh air for those travellers looking to escape the chaos of Java An explorer s paradise the vast majority of the island remains undiscovered Most of the highlights are in the north at places like Bukit Lawang a jungle shrouded river offering the best chance in Indonesia to see orang utans in the wild Danau Toba Southeast Asia s largest lake and a magical place to lose a few days and relax in one of the numerous waterside resorts on the island of Samosir and the stunning crater lake of Danau Maninjau On the west coast lies Padang recently rebuilt after the horrific earthquake of September 2009 and set within easy reach of dozens of idyllic islands including the remote Mentawai filled with adventure potential Near Sumatra s southern tip and just a short ferry hop from Java sits Bandar Lampung within striking distance of Krakatau and the surfing hub of Krui Getting around Sumatra on public transport can be gruelling distances are vast the roads tortuous and the driving hair raising The good news is that many of Indonesia s domestic airlines have made safety a higher priority and now offer affordable connections to all the major centres in Sumatra While most travellers these

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  • Places To Visit In Bali | Best Places In Bali | Rough Guides
    by the mountainous river rich landscape of the interior Bali s most famous and crowded resort is Kuta an eight kilometre sweep of golden sand with plenty of accommodation and the best shopping and nightlife on the island Surfing is fun here too but experienced wave riders head for the surfing beaches on the Bukit peninsula and along Bali s southwest coast Sanur is a fairly sedate southern beach resort but most backpackers prefer the tranquil island of Nusa Lembongan the beaches of peaceful east coast Amed Candi Dasa and Padang Bai Immensely rich sea life means that snorkelling and diving are big draws at all these resorts Dolphin watching is the main attraction in Lovina on the north coast while Bali s major cultural destination is Ubud where traditional dances are staged every night and the streets are full of organic cafés and arts and crafts galleries In addition there are numerous elegant Hindu temples to visit particularly at Tanah Lot and Besakih and a good number of volcano hikes the most popular being the route up Gunung Batur with Gunung Agung only for the very fit Transport to and from Bali is efficient the island is served by scores of international and domestic flights which all land at Ngurah Rai Airport just south of Kuta as well as round the clock ferries from Java west across the Bali Strait from Gilimanuk and from Lombok east of Padang Bai Pelni ferries from ports across Indonesia call at Benoa harbour Brief History Bali was a more or less independent society of Buddhists and Hindus until the fourteenth century when it was colonized by the strictly Hindu Majapahits from neighbouring Java Despite the subsequent Islamicization of nearly all her neighbours Bali has remained firmly Hindu ever since In 1849 the Dutch

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