archive-com.com » COM » R » ROUGHGUIDES.COM

Total: 1603

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • What to see in Singapore | Rough Guides
    main draws for visitors are the city s historic ethnic enclaves particularly Little India a couple of kilometres north of the river Packed with gaudy Hindu temples curry houses and stores selling exotic produce and spices the district retains much of its original character as does nearby Arab Street dominated by the golden domes of the Sultan Mosque South of the river Chinatown is a little sanitized though it still has a number of appealing shrines an immaculately restored Chinese mansion the Baba House plus a heritage centre documenting the hardships experienced by generations of Chinese migrants in Singapore Wherever you wander in these old quarters you ll see rows of the city s characteristic shophouses compact townhouse like buildings that are the island s traditional architectural hallmark Of course the British left their distinctive imprint on the island as well most visibly just north of the Singapore River in the Colonial District around whose grand Neoclassical buildings including City Hall Parliament House and the famed Raffles Hotel the island s British residents used to promenade Also here are the excellent National Museum showcasing Singapore s history and culture and Fort Canning Hill a lush park that s home to a few historic remains All these are constantly being upstaged however by the newest part of town Marina Bay built on reclaimed land around a man made reservoir into which the Singapore River now drains Around it are arrayed the three towered Marina Bay Sands casino resort the spiky roofed Esplanade Theatres on the Bay arts centre and Gardens by the Bay with its two huge arch shaped conservatories Nearly as modern as Marina Bay but steeped in tradition as far as Singaporean consumerism is concerned is Orchard Road a parade of shopping malls that begins just a few minutes

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/singapore/what-to-see/ (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive


  • When to go to Singapore | Rough Guides
    Show Related Guides Hide Related Guides The Rough Guide to Southeast Asia On A Budget View Guide The Rough Guide to Malaysia Singapore Brunei View Guide The Rough Guide to Singapore View Guide The Rough Guide to Taiwan View Guide The Rough Guide to Bali Lombok View Guide The Rough Guide to Laos View Guide The Rough Guide to Sri Lanka View Guide The Rough Guide to First Time Around The World View Guide The Rough Guide to Vietnam View Guide Rough Guides Snapshot Vietnam Hanoi View Guide Singapore When to go Singapore s climate is simplicity itself hot and humid The island experiences two monsoons from the southwest May Sept and the northeast Nov March the latter picking up plenty of moisture from the South China Sea Consequently December and January are usually the rainiest months though it can be wet at any time of year during the southwest monsoon for example there are often predawn squally showers sweeping across from the Straits of Malacca The inter monsoon months of April and October have a tendency to be especially stifling due to the lack of breezes At least it s easy enough to prepare for Singapore s weather have

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/singapore/when-to-go/ (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Getting there | About Singapore | Rough Guides
    time to book your tickets is during the autumn and winter as this tends to be when the airlines advertise promotional fares valid for travel within the next six to nine months and shaving at least ten percent off regular prices Besides the usual online agents it may be worth contacting Lee s Travel UK 0800 811 9888 leestravel com or Rex Air UK 020 7439 1898 rexair co uk both of which specialize in Far Eastern flights Flights from the US and Canada Singapore is roughly halfway around the world from North America which means that whether you head east or west towards Southeast Asia you have a long journey ahead Setting off from the west coast you ll invariably fly west across the Pacific it s faster to fly the transatlantic route if you re departing from the east coast though sometimes it can cost less to fly via the Pacific Unsurprisingly the most comprehensive service is provided by Singapore Airlines which operates daily direct flights from New York nonstop from Newark the longest scheduled passenger flight in the world at 19hr or from JFK via Frankfurt Los Angeles 18hr nonstop or via Tokyo and San Francisco via Seoul or Hong Kong plus several flights a week from Houston via Moscow Indirect flights on other airlines might not add more than a couple of hours to your journey if you re lucky with connections and will often cost less From New York you ll pay at least US 1100 in low season for the round trip or US 1500 in high season fares from the west coast tend to be slightly lower From Canada the best fares are from Vancouver Can 1100 in low season rising by 30 percent or so in high season fares from other Canadian airports are at least twenty percent higher Flights from Australia and New Zealand The budget carriers JetStar Tiger Airways and Scoot an offshoot of Singapore Airlines offer some of the best deals from Australia to Singapore JetStar has the best coverage with flights from cities including Melbourne Perth Cairns and Darwin while Tiger Airways only flies directly between Singapore and Perth though it offers connections from other cities Scoot serves only Gold Coast airports at the time of writing From New Zealand it s possible to fly to Singapore with JetStar from Auckland Otherwise the usual full cost airlines including quite a few Southeast Asian carriers operate to Singapore from major cities Flights from Auckland to Singapore take just over ten hours nonstop while from Sydney and Perth the journey takes eight and five hours respectively Fares in high season are generally up to a third higher than in low season In general a low season return ticket from Melbourne to Singapore can start from as little as Aus 600 on JetStar while the same flights on a full cost airline cost around Aus 900 From Auckland you re looking at fares of around NZ 1300 in low season with

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/singapore/getting/ (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Arrival | About Singapore | Rough Guides
    reservation counters which represent the major hotels There are also the usual exchange facilities ATMs and plenty of shops restaurants and food courts But chances are you ll not linger long baggage comes through so quickly that you can be heading to the city centre within twenty minutes of arrival The airport s MRT metro station is beneath terminals 2 and 3 Trains run between 5 30am 6am on Sun and midnight daily to Tanah Merah MRT two stops away where you transfer to trains on the main East West line into town Note that the last downtown train leaves from here around 11 30pm A one way ticket for the half hour downtown trip costs just under 2 though unless you buy a stored value card you will also have to pay a 1 deposit which is refunded at your destination station when you return the ticket All the three main terminals are served by the 36 bus every 10min 6am midnight around 2 which passes through the suburb of Katong and Marina Centre before heading to the Orchard Road area Whether you take the MRT or a bus lack of room for luggage especially on the bus may be a hindrance To get round the problem consider taking the Airport Shuttle bus 9 6 which calls at downtown hotels or the Beesybus shuttle which serves backpacker lodges and budget hotels in Katong the Arab Street area and Little India 6396 6694 beesybus com 8 As for taxis reckon on at least 20 to get downtown though note that airport departures command a surcharge of a few dollars on the metered fare with a fifty percent surcharge between midnight and 6am By bus Most buses from Malaysia and Thailand use the main causeway to reach Singapore from Johor and terminate at one of three locations Local buses from Johor Bahru JB in Malaysia arrive at the Queen Street terminal a couple of minutes walk from the Bugis MRT station Buses from further afield in Malaysia and from Thailand may terminate at the Golden Mile Complex on Beach Road or at a number of other locations used by individual companies some of which are based near Lavender MRT Bus 100 southwest along Beach Road will take you close to City Hall and Esplanade MRT stations Arriving at the causeway you will have to get off the bus on the Malaysian side to clear immigration and customs then get back on board if you re on a local 170 bus hang on to your ticket and use it to continue on any vehicle on this route to reach the Singapore side of the bridge where you go through the same rigmarole When major jams build up at the causeway as they often do follow the crowd and get off the bus a little way before the checkpoints it s much faster to walk By train For decades trains from Malaysia used the Art Deco Singapore Railway Station on Keppel Road southwest

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/singapore/arrival/ (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Transport | About Singapore | Rough Guides
    services which run express for much of their route always have route numbers of the form 5xx and cost 3 or 3 50 and night buses which operate late on Fridays Saturdays and before a public holiday and connect downtown with the new towns SMRT s night buses 11 30pm 4 30am 3 50 start from Resorts World Sentosa while SBS night buses midnight 2am 4 operate from Marina Centre they can be useful for downtown travel after the MRT shuts but note that they may run express in certain parts of town Both the SBS Transit and SMRT websites have detailed breakdowns of their bus routes including journey planners and maps A pocket sized guide to the network the Singapore Bus Guide is also available from bookshops for a few dollars Taxis Singapore s taxis are seemingly without number and they keep on proliferating indeed some locals joke that in uncertain economic times the authori ties probably license yet more taxis to keep jobless figures down While this means flagging down a taxi generally isn t a problem it can be tricky at night or during a storm If you have difficulty finding a cab it s best to join the queue at the nearest taxi rank hotels and malls are your best bet Note that in the downtown area queueing at a taxi is supposed to be compulsory though some drivers will ignore this rule to pick up passengers on quieter roads after dark If you want to book a taxi over the phone you ll pay a fee of at least 2 50 or at least 8 if you want a vehicle at a specific time rather than the next available one To book a taxi either call 6342 5222 which represents all of the taxi operators or try individual firms such as Comfort CityCab 6552 1111 Premier Taxi 6363 6888 or SMRT Taxis 6555 8888 Taxis come in various colours but all are clearly marked TAXI and have a sign or display on top indicating if they are available for hire Regular cabs as opposed to premium limousine vehicles charge 3 for the first kilometre and then 22c for every 400 metres travelled with a slightly lower tariff kicking in after you ve gone 10km There are surcharges to bear in mind 25 percent extra on journeys during rush hour which for taxis means Mon Fri 6 9 30am 6pm midnight Sat Sun 6pm midnight and fifty percent extra between midnight and 6am Then there are charges arising from Singapore s electronic road pricing ERP scheme which means a 3 surcharge on taxi journeys starting from the ERP zone downtown between 5pm and midnight plus passengers being liable for the actual ERP charge their trip has incurred shown on the driver s ERP card reader Journeys from Changi Airport incur a 3 surcharge 5 Fri Sun 5pm midnight trips from Sentosa 3 On the whole Singaporean taxi drivers are friendly and honest but their English isn

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/singapore/transport/ (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Accommodation | About Singapore | Rough Guides
    Guide The Rough Guide to Southeast Asia On A Budget View Guide The Rough Guide to Malaysia Singapore Brunei View Guide The Rough Guide to Sri Lanka View Guide The Rough Guide to Thailand s Beaches Islands View Guide Rough Guides Snapshot Malaysia Kuala Lumpur View Guide The Rough Guide to Vietnam View Guide The Rough Guide to Beijing View Guide Rough Guides Snapshot Vietnam Hanoi View Guide Indonesia Rough Guides Snapshot Southeast Asia on a Budget View Guide Singapore Accommodation While prices may disappoint the range of accommodation in Singapore will not The island has a plethora of luxury hotels including a handful that exude colonial splendour notably the Raffles and the Fullerton plus competently run if unexciting no frills and mid range establishments The best of the upstart boutique hotels have an unorthodox or ultra luxurious design aesthetic though some of the more affordable places tend simply to boast a smattering of antique furniture There are also numerous hostels and guesthouses the distinction between them is blurry offering affordable dorm beds and some private rooms A few of these places are spartan but most are housed in nicely refurbished shophouses and offer air conditioning wi fi a comfy

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/singapore/accommodation/ (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Eating | About Singapore | Rough Guides
    dozens of classic one plate rice and noodle dishes plus other more elaborate dishes Indian food Indian food As befits a country whose Indian community is largely Tamil Indian food in Singapore tends to be synonymous with South Indian cooking which is generally spicy makes heavy use of coconut and tamarind and emphasizes starchy and vegetarian food The classic southern Indian dish is the dosai or thosai a thin rice flour pancake It s usually served accompanied by sambar a watery vegetable and dhal lentil curry rasam a spicy clear soup flavoured with tamarind and perhaps a few small helpings of vegetable or dhal curries plus coconut or mint chutney Also very common are rotis griddle breads plus the more substantial murtabak thicker than a roti and stuffed with egg onion and minced meat The latter is a particular specialty of Indian Muslim kopitiams and stalls which form a sideshoot of the South Indian eating scene and tend to place much more emphasis on meat One endearing aspect of South Indian restaurants is that they often serve food on a banana leaf platter the waiters dishing out replenishable heaps of various curries along with mounds of rice In some restaurants you ll find more substantial dishes such as the popular fish head curry don t be put off by the idea the cheeks between the mouth and gills are packed with tasty flesh South Indian restaurants tend to be very reasonably priced North Indian food is usually pricier though some cheap South Indian places will offer attempts at northern cooking and tends to be richer less fiery and more reliant on mutton and chicken In Singapore tandoori dishes the tandoor being the clay oven in which the food is cooked are the most common North Indian offerings particularly tandoori chicken marinated in yoghurt and spices and then baked Breads such as nan also tend to feature rather than rice though just about every restaurant has a version of biriyani Malay and Indonesian food Malay and Indonesian food Though Malays form the largest minority in Singapore the Malay eating scene is a bit one dimensional mainly because the Malays themselves don t have a tradition of elaborate eating out Every hawker centre has several Malay stalls but these tend to serve fairly basic rice and noodle dishes It s a shame because Malay cuisine is a spicy and sophisticated affair with interesting connections to China in the use of noodles and soy sauce but also to Thailand with which it shares an affinity for such ingredients as lemon grass the ginger like galingale and fermented fish sauce the Malay version budu is made from anchovies Malay cooking also draws on Indian and Middle East cooking in the use of spices and in dishes such as biriyani rice The resulting cuisine is characterized by being both spicy and a little sweet Santan coconut milk lends a sweet creamy undertone to many stews and curries while belacan a pungent fermented prawn paste something

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/singapore/eating/ (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Drinking and nightlife | About Singapore | Rough Guides
    Marina Bay Sentosa and the southern isles Northern Singapore Eastern Singapore Western Singapore Shop Ebooks Travel Insurance Hostels Drinking and nightlife Show Related Guides Hide Related Guides The Rough Guide to Southeast Asia On A Budget View Guide The Rough Guide to Singapore View Guide The Rough Guide to Malaysia Singapore Brunei View Guide The Rough Guide to Bali Lombok View Guide The Rough Guide to China View Guide The Rough Guide to the Philippines View Guide Pocket Rough Guide Hong Kong Macau View Guide The Rough Guide to Thailand View Guide Rough Guides Snapshot Vietnam Hanoi View Guide The Rough Guide to Japan View Guide Singapore Drinking and nightlife With its affluence and large expat community Singapore supports a huge range of drinking holes from elegant colonial chambers through hip rooftop venues with skyline views to slightly tacky joints featuring karaoke or middling covers bands There s also a bunch of glitzy and vibrant clubs where people let their hair down to cutting edge sounds minus this being Singapore any assistance from illicit substances Some venues regularly manage to lure the world s leading DJs to play too Read More Things not to miss Explore Singapore Features Gallery Where

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/singapore/drinking-nightlife/ (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive



  •