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  • Entertainment | About Singapore | Rough Guides
    View Guide The Rough Guide to China View Guide The Rough Guide to Seoul View Guide Kyushu Rough Guides Snapshot Japan View Guide Rough Guides Snapshot Vietnam Ho Chi Minh City View Guide Tibet Rough Guides Snapshot China View Guide The Rough Guide to Southwest China View Guide Singapore Entertainment Singapore offers an excellent range of cultural events in all genres drawing on both Asian and Western traditions and even on a brief visit it s hard not to notice how much money has been invested in the arts Prime downtown property has been turned over to arts organizations in areas like Waterloo Street and Little India and prestige venues like Theatres on the Bay bring in world class performers at top dollar prices This isn t to say that all is hunky dory questions remain over whether creativity is truly valued when censorship lingers if not as overtly as in the 1970s and 1980s then in terms of there being well established red lines concerning party politics ethnicity and religion which no one dare cross More cynically some say that support for the arts is a way to keep Singapore attractive to expats and its own sometimes restive middle class Read More Things not to miss Explore Singapore Features Gallery Where Next Check out Eastern Singapore Book a hostel in Singapore Travel Offers Travel insurance Hotels Hostels Car hire Tours Explore What to see When to go Getting there Arrival Transport Accommodation Eating Drinking and nightlife Entertainment Shopping Festivals Kids Singapore The media Travel essentials Find out more Street theatre Street theatre Walk around Singapore long enough and you re likely to stumble upon some sort of streetside cultural event most usually a wayang a Malay word used in Singapore to denote Chinese opera Played out on outdoor stages

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/singapore/entertainment-arts/ (2016-02-16)
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  • Shopping | About Singapore | Rough Guides
    Related Guides The Rough Guide to Singapore View Guide The Rough Guide to Malaysia Singapore Brunei View Guide The Rough Guide to Southeast Asia On A Budget View Guide Central Honshu Rough Guides Snapshot Japan View Guide The Rough Guide to Thailand s Beaches Islands View Guide Rough Guides Snapshot Malaysia Kuala Lumpur View Guide Rough Guides Snapshot Vietnam Ho Chi Minh City View Guide The Rough Guide to Taiwan View Guide The Rough Guide to India View Guide The Rough Guide to Vietnam View Guide Singapore Shopping Choice and convenience make the Singapore shopping experience a rewarding one but the island s affluence and strong currency mean most things are priced at Western levels Perhaps the best time to bargain hunt is during the Great Singapore Sale from late May to late July w greatsingaporesale com sg when prices are marked down across the island Unsurprisingly Orchard Road boasts the biggest cluster of malls bulging with designer names Malls elsewhere tend to be more informal the most interesting ones in Chinatown are like multistorey markets home to a few traditional outlets stocking Chinese foodstuffs medicines instruments and porcelain Singapore s remaining shophouses are worthy of attention too as many

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  • Festivals | About Singapore | Rough Guides
    Guides Hide Related Guides The Rough Guide to Singapore View Guide The Rough Guide to Malaysia Singapore Brunei View Guide The Rough Guide to Southeast Asia On A Budget View Guide The Rough Guide to Sri Lanka View Guide The Rough Guide to Taiwan View Guide The Rough Guide to India View Guide Rough Guides Snapshot Vietnam Hanoi View Guide The Rough Guide to Nepal View Guide Central Honshu Rough Guides Snapshot Japan View Guide The Rough Guide to Japan View Guide Singapore Festivals With so many ethnic groups and religions present in Singapore it would be unusual if your trip didn t coincide with some sort of traditional festival ranging from exuberant family oriented pageants to blood curdlingly gory displays of devotion Below is a chronological round up of Singapore s major festivals excluding commercial events themed around shopping or the arts for example which are covered in the relevant chapters with suggestions of where best to enjoy them The dates of many of these change annually according to the lunar calendar we ve listed rough timings but for specific dates it s a good idea to check with the Singapore Tourism Board w yoursingapore com Some festivals are

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/singapore/festivals/ (2016-02-16)
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  • Kids’ Singapore | About Singapore | Rough Guides
    Show Related Guides Hide Related Guides The Rough Guide to Singapore View Guide The Rough Guide to Malaysia Singapore Brunei View Guide The Rough Guide to Southeast Asia On A Budget View Guide Kansai Rough Guides Snapshot Japan View Guide The Yellow River Rough Guides Snapshot China View Guide Hokkaido Rough Guides Snapshot Japan View Guide The Yangzi Basin Rough Guides Snapshot China View Guide Indonesia Rough Guides Snapshot Southeast Asia on a Budget View Guide The Rough Guide to Taiwan View Guide Rough Guides Snapshot Vietnam Ho Chi Minh City View Guide Singapore Kids Singapore Slick yet suitably exotic Singapore can feel like a gigantic theme park to children and just wandering Little India or even Orchard Road should unearth plenty to interest them Reactions to the Hindu and Buddhist temples covered throughout this book will vary some children are utterly fascinated by them while for others the colourful statuary and religious ceremonies just sail over their heads Traditional festivals are generally entertaining too but Thaipusam is one event which might freak some kids out Otherwise there are several theme parks around Singapore and of course Sentosa is one giant theme park see Chapter 9 for more Upmarket shops

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/singapore/kids-singapore/ (2016-02-16)
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  • The media | About Singapore | Rough Guides
    Rough Guide to Malaysia Singapore Brunei View Guide The Rough Guide to China View Guide The Rough Guide to Taiwan View Guide The Rough Guide to Thailand View Guide The Rough Guide to the Philippines View Guide The Rough Guide to Cambodia View Guide Rough Guides Snapshot Malaysia Kuala Lumpur View Guide The Rough Guide to India View Guide Singapore The media Singapore boasts plenty of newspapers TV channels and radio stations serving up lively reportage of events sports and entertainment in the four official languages though don t expect to come across hard hitting or healthily sceptical coverage of domestic politics The media are kept on their toes by a legal requirement that they must periodically renew their licence to publish and most newspapers have actually been herded into a conglomerate in which the state has a major stake Likewise radio and TV are dominated by Mediacorp a company which is effectively stated owned satellite dishes are banned and while many international broadcasters are available on cable the sole cable provider is a company in which Mediacorp is a major shareholder While a wide range of foreign newspapers and magazines are available from bookstores there are occasional bans on editions containing pieces that displease the authorities and Singapore s leaders have a long history of winning defamation suits against foreign publications in the island s courts Given these circumstances it s no surprise that in the 2011 12 World Press Freedom Index issued by the pressure group Reporters Without Borders Singapore was far down the rankings at no 135 some way below much poorer nations not exactly noted as exemplars of free speech such as Albania and Paraguay If this seems an unremittingly bleak picture it should be said that the advent of independent news websites and blogs has

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/singapore/media/ (2016-02-16)
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  • Travel essentials | About Singapore | Rough Guides
    are up to date with your polio typhoid tetanus and hepatitis A inoculations It pays to use mosquito repellent in Singapore particularly if you re in a nature reserve or beach area This isn t because Singapore is malarial it isn t but because mosquitoes may carry dengue fever an illness which is seldom fatal but can be debilitating while it lasts Note that DEET based repellents are not available in Singapore so if you prefer these you will have to buy them abroad Travellers unused to tropical climates periodically suffer from sunburn and dehydration The easiest way to avoid this is to restrict your exposure to the sun use high factor sunscreens drink plenty of water and wear sunglasses and a hat Heat stroke is more serious it is indicated by a high temperature dry red skin and a fast pulse and can require hospitalization Medical services in Singapore are excellent with staff almost everywhere speaking good English Pharmacies are well stocked with familiar brand name drugs though only the largest outlets have pharmacists dispensing prescription medication the two main chains are Guardian and Watsons both ubiquitous Private clinics are found throughout the city even inside shopping malls such as the Tanglin Shopping Centre 19 Tanglin Rd and Paragon 290 Orchard Rd A consultation costs from 50 You can find a list of dentists at w yellowpages com sg Insurance Before you set off it s a good idea to arrange travel insurance to cover medical expenses as well as loss of luggage cancellation of flights and so on A typical policy usually provides cover for the loss of baggage tickets and up to a certain limit cash or cheques as well as cancellation or curtailment of your journey Most of them exclude so called dangerous sports unless an extra premium is paid When securing baggage cover make sure that the per article limit will cover your most valuable possession If you need to make a claim you should keep receipts for medicines and medical treatment and in the event that you have anything stolen you must obtain an official statement from the police Internet access The best place to look for internet cafés is Little India where they are ubiquitous and charge as little as 2 per hour Chinatown and Orchard Road have a sprinkling of internet cafés too though they may charge quite a bit more Several café chains offer free wi fi too It s also possible to sign up for the free Wireless SG wi fi service available in the lobbies of many shopping malls though not always reliable it s mighty convenient when it works One site where you can sign up is at bit ly dw6fFX The snag is that you will need a friend with a Singapore mobile phone as the system can only send your password by SMS to a local number Mail Singapore s postal system is predictably efficient The island has dozens of post offices typically Mon Fri 9 30am 6pm Sat 9 30am 2pm including one conveniently off Orchard Road at 1 Killiney Rd near Somerset MRT that keeps extended hours Mon Fri 9 30am 9pm Sat 9 30am 4pm Sun 10 30am 4pm Poste restante general delivery bring proof of ID is at the Singapore Post Centre 10 Eunos Rd near Paya Lebar MRT Mon Fri 8am 6pm Sat 8am 2pm For more on the mail system contact SingPost t 1605 w www singpost com Maps The best maps of Singapore are those at w streetdirectory com also accessible via the Singapore Maps app Besides being totally up to speed with the constant rebuilding and reshaping of Singapore these maps include handy features such as the ability to view shops inside buildings by clicking and clicking on bus stops to reveal which buses serve them and when the next services will arrive Bookshops sell printed versions of these maps as street atlases with new editions regularly published Otherwise the maps in this book should be sufficient for most of your exploration and you can back them up with free foldout maps available from the Singapore Tourism Board Money Singapore s currency is the Singapore dollar divided into 100 cents Notes are issued in denominations of 2 5 10 20 50 100 500 1000 and 10 000 coins are in denominations of 1 5 10 20 and 50 cents and 1 At the time of writing the exchange rate was around 2 to 1 and 1 25 to US 1 All dollar prices in this book are in local currency unless otherwise stated Singapore banking hours are generally Monday to Friday 9 30am to 3pm although some open until 6pm Saturday 9 30am to 12 30pm Major branches on Orchard Road are open Sunday 9 30am to 3pm as well Outside of these hours currency exchange is available at moneychangers whose rates are comparable to those at banks Major hotels also offer currency exchange though don t expect their rates to be competitive ATMs are plentiful around Singapore and take most types of debit and credit card usually charging a fee for each withdrawal Larger retailers and companies accept all major cards and there are often adverts in the press offering discounts on shopping and meals if you pay with your card Opening hours and public holidays Shopping centres are open daily 10am to 9 30pm while offices generally work Monday to Friday 8 30am to 5pm and sometimes on Saturday mornings In general Chinese temples open daily from 7am to around 6pm Hindu temples 6am to noon and 5 to 9pm and mosques 8 30am to noon and 2 30 to 4pm Singapore has numerous public holidays reflecting its mix of cultures Dates for some of these vary with Muslim festivals we ve given the months in which they fall during 2013 15 It s worth noting the dates of local school holidays at which time Sentosa and other places of interest to kids can be inordinately

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  • Things not to miss in Singapore | Photo Gallery | Rough Guides
    Us Facebook Twitter Newsletter Log in Asia Introduction China Cambodia India Indonesia Japan Laos Malaysia Nepal Myanmar Burma Philippines Singapore South Korea Sri Lanka Taiwan Thailand Vietnam See all destinations Singapore Overview Introduction What to see When to go Getting there Arrival Transport Accommodation Eating Drinking and nightlife Entertainment Shopping Festivals Kids Singapore The media Travel essentials Inspiration Things not to miss Features Gallery Explore The Colonial District Little India

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  • The Colonial District Guide | Singapore Travel | Rough Guides
    Raffles Hotel Peranakan Museum Stamford Road Fort Canning Park Along River Valley Road Bras Basah Road Find out more The Singapore River The Singapore River Little more than a creek in the nineteenth century the Singapore River became the main artery of Singapore s growing trade and was clogged with bumboats traditional cargo boats the size of houseboats with eyes painted on their prows as if to see where they were going The boat pilots ferried coffee sugar and rice to warehouses called godowns where coolies loaded and unloaded sacks In the 1880s the river itself was so busy it was practically possible to walk from one side to the other without getting your feet wet Of course bridges were built across it as well mostly endearingly compact and old fangled apart from the massive new Esplanade Bridge at the mouth of the river Walk beside the river today all sanitized and packed with trendy restaurants and bars some occupying the few surviving godowns and it s hard to imagine that in the 1970s this was still a working river It was also filthy and the river s current status as one of the leading nightlife centres of Singapore ultimately originates in a massive clean up campaign launched back then which saw the river s commercial traffic moved west to Pasir Panjang within the space of a few years Several museums have sections exploring the role the river once played and the pros and cons of its transformation with a particularly good discussion at the Asian Civilisations Museum which states frankly the project also washed away the river s vibrant history as a trade waterway Its newly cleaned waters now appeared characterless and sterile At least today various boat rides offer a view of the riverside restaurants and city skyline Sir Stamford Raffles Sir Stamford Raffles Despite living and working in a period of imperial arrogance and land grabbing Sir Stamford Raffles maintained an unfailing concern for the welfare of the people under his governorship and a conviction that British colonial expansion was for the general good He believed Britain to be as Jan Morris says in her introduction to Maurice Collis s biography of Raffles the chief agent of human progress the example of fair Government Fittingly for a man who was to spend his life roaming the globe Thomas Stamford Raffles was born at sea on July 6 1781 on the Ann whose master was his father Captain Benjamin Raffles By his fourteenth birthday the young Raffles was working as a clerk for the East India Company in London his schooling curtailed because of his father s debts Even at this early age Raffles ambition and self motivation was evident as he stayed up through the night to study and developed a hunger for knowledge which would later spur him to learn Malay amass a vast treasure trove of natural history artefacts and write his two volume History of Java Raffles diligence and hard work showed through in

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