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  • Vintage London | London Retro | Vintage Shops London | Rough Guides
    Winter sports The Lowdown on Vintage London By Site Editor May 1st 2013 View Comments As The Rough Guide to Vintage London is published May 1 one of its authors Frances Ambler explains why she finds this aspect of the city so exciting Eye popping pink and blue concentric circles on polyester my first London vintage purchase is indelibly printed on my memory I was fourteen in Camden Market and out to spend the tenner burning a hole in my pocket I knew that this was the dress to make me stand out in the sea of mid 90s khaki back on the high street of my hometown I leave the polyester on the rail now but London s varied vintage scene is still an inspiring hunting ground for my retro whims whether that s some sparkling costume jewellery or a spectacular piece of Art Deco lighting While each of the shops bars and venues listed in The Rough Guide to Vintage London has its individual charms what s interesting is that every postcode of the city is characterized by a different definition of vintage On Brick Lane it might mean rummaging for a 1980s jumper or a 90s rucksack In design conscious Clerkenwell it s about the mid twentieth century Scandinavian pieces sold by carefully curated places such as Førest Or head to Islington for the high quality boutique selections available at Annie s and Fat Faced Cat To me the pleasure comes from being able to pick and choose from the abundant variety spread out across the city I have pretty 1950s dresses bought from 162 Holloway Road an Ercol sideboard found in my local Crystal Palace Antiques and I ve enjoyed one too many classic Manhattans in the glamorous West End setting of Brasserie Zédel Although vintage has seemingly never been so fashionable the explosion of the scene in the East End over the past ten years or so has parallels throughout the second half of the twentieth century In the 1960s buying Edwardian or Victorian clothes from the likes of Granny Takes a Trip on the King s Road was as much of a counter cultural expression as picking up a pair of brothel creepers in Dalston is today Notting Hill may now be one of London s most desirable neighbourhoods but its 1970s bohemianism can still be glimpsed in the eclectic wares still widely available there And just as the current vintage enthusiasm is tinged with a longing for a time that never really was long established Soho fixtures such as American Classics and Ed s Easy Diner grew out of a nostalgic yearning for 1950s Americana The club kids who swooped on Wayne and Gerardine Hemingway s Camden Market stall in the 1980s meanwhile have been succeeded by today s charity shop raiding fashion bloggers It was a joy to revisit old favourites and discover fantastic new places while researching The Rough Guide to Vintage London and it seemed tantalisingly possible that with enough

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/article/vintage-london/ (2016-02-16)
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  • Ocho Rios and the north coast Guide | Jamaica Travel | Rough Guides
    to Trinidad Tobago View Guide The Rough Guide to Guatemala View Guide Rough Guide Audio Phrasebook and Dictionary Latin American Spanish View Guide The Rough Guide to Belize View Guide Rough Guides Snapshot Central America on a Budget Nicaragua View Guide The north coast is the most developed area of Jamaica outside the capital boasting numerous things to do and an energetic atmosphere Highway upgrades between Montego Bay and Ocho Rios have effectively halved journey times between the two cities opening up most of the coastline to new resort and villa developments With many villages and towns running seamlessly into the next it s sometimes hard to know where each urban area starts and ends The attraction of the north coast is nonetheless clear as soon as you leave the main road barrelling through the diverse parishes of St Mary St Ann and Trelawny there is stunning scenery sweeping cane and coconut plantations mangrove swamps luscious farmland and kilometres of white sand beaches with reefs less than a hundred feet out to sea Yet this tourist coast can sometimes seem like Jamaica at its most forlorn sights are often contrived and expensive resorts are mostly fenced in all inclusives and ingrained hustling can make interactions feel like a sales pitch Much development is centred on the garden parish of St Ann so called because of the area s immensely fertile soil St Ann has also spawned luminaries such as Marcus Garvey Bob Marley and Winston Burning Spear Rodney and is considered by some as the spiritual centre of the island The nucleus of the parish and the home of the famous Dunn s River Falls Ocho Rios is Jamaica s most popular holiday destination with high rise blocks buzzing jet skis and thumping nightlife But just a few kilometres to

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/central-america-and-the-caribbean/jamaica/ocho-rios-north-coast/ (2016-02-16)
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  • Things not to miss in Nicaragua | Photo Gallery | Rough Guides
    Travel Insurance Hostels Tours Car Rentals Follow Us Facebook Twitter Newsletter Log in Central America the Caribbean Introduction Belize Cuba Jamaica Costa Rica Dominican Republic Guatemala Honduras Nicaragua Panama Puerto Rico See all destinations Nicaragua Overview Introduction Where to go When to go Fact file Getting there Getting around Accommodation Food and drink Culture and etiquette Festivals Sports and outdoor activities Travel essentials Inspiration Things not to miss Features Gallery

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/central-america-and-the-caribbean/nicaragua/things-not-to-miss/ (2016-02-16)
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  • Hanging out in the Jemaa el Fna square, Morocco | Travel Feature | Rough Guides
    Nightlife Novelty Off the beaten track People Photography Railway journeys Relaxation Road trips Romance Shopping Structures Surfing Tourist Trail Tradition Transport Walking trekking Wildlife Winter sports Hanging out in the Jemaa el Fna square Morocco By Site Editor October 30th 2013 View Comments There s nowhere on Earth like the Jemaa el Fna the square at the heart of old Marrakesh The focus of the evening promenade for locals the Jemaa is a heady blend of alfresco food bazaar and street theatre for as long as you re in town you ll want to come back here again and again Goings on in the square by day merely hint at the evening s spectacle Breeze through and you ll stumble upon a few snake charmers tooth pullers and medicine men plying their trade while henna tattooists offer to paint your hands with a traditional design In case you re thirsty water sellers dressed in gaudy costumes complete with enormous bright red hats vie for your custom alongside a line of stalls offering orange and grapefruit juice pressed on the spot Around dusk however you ll find yourself swept up in a pulsating circus of performers There are acrobats from the Atlas Mountains dancers in drag and musicians from a religious brotherhood called the Gnaoua chanting and beating out rhythms late into the night with their clanging iron castanets Other groups play Moroccan folk music while storytellers heirs to an ancient tradition draw raucous crowds to hear their tales In their midst dozens of food stalls are set up lit by gas lanterns and surrounded by delicious smelling plumes of cooking smoke Here you can partake of spicy harira soup try charcoal roasted kebabs or merguez sausage or if you re really adventurous and hungry a whole sheep s head including

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/article/hanging-out-in-the-jemaa-el-fna-square-morocco/ (2016-02-16)
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  • Hong Kong and Macau Guide | China Travel | Rough Guides
    View Guide The Rough Guide to Thailand s Beaches Islands View Guide The handover of Asia s last two European colonies Hong Kong in 1997 and Macau in 1999 opened new eras for both Despite a visible colonial heritage the dominant Chinese character underlying these two SARs or Special Administrative Regions of China is obvious after all Hong Kong and Macau s population is 97 percent Chinese the main language is Cantonese and there have always been close ties if tinged with distrust with their cousins north of the border It is hard to overstate the importance that the handovers had for the Chinese government in sealing the end of centuries of colonial intrusion with the return of the last pieces of foreign occupied soil to the motherland Hong Kong and Macau s population widely supported the transfer of power if only to see how much leeway they could garner under the new administration Both entities now find themselves in the unique position of being capitalist enclaves subject to a communist state under the relatively liberal One Country Two Systems policy coined by the late Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping First under colonial and now mainland Chinese rule Hong Kong and Macau s citizens have never had a say in their futures so they have concentrated their efforts on other things notably making money With its emphasis on economics and consumerism Hong Kong offers the greatest variety and concentration of shops and shopping on earth along with a colossal range of cuisines and vistas of sea and island green mountains and futuristic cityscapes The excellent infrastructure including the efficient public transit system the helpful tourist offices and all the other facilities of a genuinely international city make this an extremely soft entry into the Chinese world While Hong Kong is a

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/china/hong-kong-macau/ (2016-02-16)
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  • Hokkaidō Guide | Japan Travel | Rough Guides
    largest island yet a mere five percent of the population lives here Even so cities such as the stylish capital Sapporo and historically important Hakodate are just as sophisticated and packed with facilities as their southern cousins Only colonized by the Japanese in the last 150 years Hokkaidō is devoid of ancient temples shrines and monuments over 200 years old What it does have is a fascinating cultural history defined by its dwindling Ainu population Spring through autumn are the ideal times to explore the island s six major national parks and countryside Apart from those highlighted opposite Shikotsu Tōya National Park has two beautiful lakes and a volcano that only started sprouting in 1943 while the countryside around Furano bursts in colour with fields of lavender and other flowers Come winter Hokkaidō takes on a special quality you can ski at some of Japan s best and least crowded ski resorts or view many snow and ice festivals of which Sapporo s giant Yuki Matsuri is the most famous Read More More about Japan Features Where Next Check out Kyushu Book a hostel in Japan Travel Offers Travel insurance Hotels Hostels Car hire Tours Explore Sapporo Niseko Hakodate Shikotsu Tōya National Park Central Hokkaidō Eastern Hokkaidō Find out more The Ainu The Ainu Isabella Bird Unbeaten Tracks in Japan 1880 they are uncivilizable and altogether irreclaimable savages yet they are attractive I hope I shall never forget the music of their low sweet voices the soft light of their mild brown eyes and the wonderful sweetness of their smile Victorian traveller Isabella Bird had some misconceived notions about the Ainu but anyone who has ever listened to their hauntingly beautiful music will agree that they are a people not easily forgotten The Ainu s roots are uncertain some believe they come from Siberia or Central Asia and they are thought to have lived on Hokkaidō the Kuril Islands Sakhalin and northern Honshū since the seventh century The early Ainu were hairy wide eyed even today you can notice such differences in full blooded Ainu and lived a hunter gatherer existence but their culture revolving around powerful animist beliefs was sophisticated as shown by their unique clothing and epic songs and stories in a language quite unlike Japanese Up until the Meiji restoration Japanese contact with the Ainu in Hokkaidō then called Ezochi was limited to trade and the people were largely left alone in the north of the island However when the Japanese sought to fully colonize Hokkaidō the impact on the Ainu was disastrous Their culture was suppressed they were kicked off ancestral lands saw forests cleared where they had hunted and suffered epidemics of diseases from which they had no natural immunity Their way of life went into seemingly terminal decline and assimilation seemed inevitable after a law of 1899 labelled the Ainu as former aborigines obliging them to take on Japanese citizenship Over a century later against all odds fragments of Ainu culture and society remain

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/japan/hokkaid%c5%8d/ (2016-02-16)
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  • Porta Caribe Guide | Puerto Rico Travel | Rough Guides
    Time Around The World View Guide The Rough Guide to Guatemala View Guide The Rough Guide to Central America On a Budget View Guide The Rough Guide to Belize View Guide The Rough Guide to Cuba View Guide Rough Guide Audio Phrasebook and Dictionary Latin American Spanish View Guide The Rough Guide to Panama View Guide Puerto Rico s balmy south coast is known as the Porta Caribe gateway to the Caribbean a designation that neatly sums up its laidback appeal The only part of Puerto Rico that actually faces the Caribbean Sea the waves here are calmer the skies warmer and the air drier than elsewhere on the island but the lack of beaches means you ll see far fewer visitors As a result traditional Puerto Rican culture remains vibrant here towns and villages exuding a strong Spanish identity closer in spirit to that of Cuba and Central America Some of the most powerful Taíno kingdoms were based here home to Agüeybaná himself overlord of the island when the Spanish arrived in 1508 but the conquerors focused their efforts elsewhere and the south remained thinly populated until the eighteenth century Sugar changed everything with plantations rapidly colonizing the narrow strip between the Central Cordillera and the coast in the nineteenth century By World War II the sugar industry had collapsed and today great swathes of the south are empty overgrown prairies a haunting reminder of a lost era Ponce is the capital of the south Puerto Rico s second city and peppered with ebullient architecture and museums a poignant legacy of those heady days of sugar Outside Ponce make time for the Centro Ceremonial Indígena de Tibes one of the most important archeological sites in the Caribbean and Hacienda Buena Vista a lush coffee plantation frozen in the nineteenth

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/central-america-and-the-caribbean/puerto-rico/porta-caribe/ (2016-02-16)
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  • Video: Things Not to Miss in Ireland | Rough Guides
    Costa Rica Cuba Dominican Republic El Salvador Grenada Guatemala Jamaica Nicaragua Panama Trinidad Tobago Europe Albania Armenia Austria Belarus Belgium Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnia Herzegovina Bulgaria Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark England Estonia Finland France Georgia Germany Greece Hungary Iceland Ireland Italy Kazakhstan Kosovo Latvia Lithuania Malta Montenegro Netherlands Norway Poland Portugal Romania Russia Scotland Serbia Slovakia Slovenia Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey Ukraine United Kingdom Wales Middle East Abu Dhabi Dubai Iran Israel Jordan Oman Qatar Saudi Arabia North America Canada Greenland Mexico USA South America Argentina Bolivia Brazil Chile Colombia Ecuador Guyana Peru Uruguay Venezuela UK View by Theme Activity Architecture Beaches Belief Boats sailing Budget travel Coasts islands Crafts and markets Cycling Deserts Discovery Diving snorkeling Everyday Life Extreme Adventure sports Family friendly Festivals events Food drink Heritage ruins Indigenous culture Leisure Luxury Mountains Museums art Music National parks reserves Nature Nightlife Novelty Off the beaten track People Photography Railway journeys Relaxation Road trips Romance Shopping Structures Surfing Tourist Trail Tradition Transport Walking trekking Wildlife Winter sports Video 24 of our favourite things about Ireland By Site Editor March 12th 2015 View Comments Ireland is a beguiling place there are craggy coastal cliffs lively pubs and history abounds

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/article/video-24-of-our-favourite-things-about-ireland/ (2016-02-16)
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