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  • WIN a travel tech bundle worth over £1000 | Travel Feature | Rough Guides
    Ecuador Guyana Peru Uruguay Venezuela UK View by Theme Activity Architecture Beaches Belief Boats sailing Budget travel Coasts islands Crafts and markets Cycling Deserts Discovery Diving snorkeling Everyday Life Extreme Adventure sports Family friendly Festivals events Food drink Heritage ruins Indigenous culture Leisure Luxury Mountains Museums art Music National parks reserves Nature Nightlife Novelty Off the beaten track People Photography Railway journeys Relaxation Road trips Romance Shopping Structures Surfing Tourist Trail Tradition Transport Walking trekking Wildlife Winter sports WIN a travel tech bundle worth over 1000 By Site Editor April 15th 2014 View Comments Congratulations to our winner Fiona King who s travel selfie was taken in St Tropez On April Fools Day we made a joke about banning the selfie but of course we d never do such a thing after all we loved your travel selfies on Twitter In fact we are rewarding you for your travel selfies with an amazing bundle of kit to take on your next trip if you enter this competition Send us your best travel selfie and you could be the proud owner of this great bundle of prizes A Nikon D3200 camera with an 18 55mm kit lens A 128gb iPad Air with retina display Three 32gb SanDisk SD cards A pair of Olympus PC I Compact Binoculars The Europe version of the CoPilot Android iOS sat nav app An El Camino bracelet Starter Pack and Region Step How to enter Now here comes the hard part which actually isn t that hard at all To be in for a chance of winning you ll need to register or log in through the Rough Guides Community and upload your best travel selfie as your profile picture Then comment on this post http bit ly 1hHdhIJ in the Community and tell us the

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/article/win-a-travel-tech-bundle-worth-over-1000/ (2016-02-16)
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  • Marrakesh Guide | Morocco Travel | Rough Guides
    and scholars arrived at the court Mansour s reign also saw the construction of the great Koutoubia Mosque and minaret By the 1220s the empire was beginning to fragment amid a series of factional civil wars and Marrakesh fell into the familiar pattern of pillage ruination and rebuilding In 1269 it lost its status as capital when the Fez based Merenids took power though in 1374 86 it did form the basis of a breakaway state under the Merenid pretender Abderrahman Ibn Taflusin Taking Marrakesh then devastated by famine in 1521 the Saadians provided a last burst of imperial splendour Their dynasty s greatest figure Ahmed el Mansour having invaded Mali and seized control of the most lucrative caravan routes in Africa had the El Badi Palace Marrakesh s largest and greatest building project constructed from the proceeds of this new wealth and the dynasty also of course bequeathed to Marrakesh their wonderful mausoleum the Saadian Tombs Modern times Under the Alaouites Marrakesh lost its status as capital to Meknes but remained an important imperial city and the need to maintain a southern base against the tribes ensured the regular presence of its sultans But from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century it shrank back from its medieval walls and lost much of its former trade During the last decades prior to the Protectorate the city s fortunes revived somewhat as it enjoyed a return to favour with the Shereefian court Moulay Hassan 1873 94 and Moulay Abd el Aziz 1894 1908 both ran their governments from here in a bizarre closing epoch of the old ways accompanied by a final bout of frantic palace building On the arrival of the French Marrakesh gave rise to a short lived pretender the religious leader El Hiba and for most of the colonial period it was run as a virtual fiefdom of its pasha T hami el Glaoui the most powerful autocratic and extraordinary character of his age Since independence the city has undergone considerable change with rural emigration from the Atlas and beyond new methods of cultivation on the Haouz plain and the development of a sizeable tourist industry After Casablanca it s Morocco s second largest city with slightly over a million inhabitants and its population continues to rise It has a thriving industrial area and is the most important market and administrative centre of southern Morocco Read More More about Morocco Itineraries Features Where Next Check out Tangier Tetouan and the northwest Book a hostel in Morocco Travel Offers Travel insurance Hotels Hostels Car hire Tours Explore The Jemaa el Fna The Koutoubia The souks Around Place de la Kissaria East of Place de la Kissaria The southern Medina The Ville Nouvelle Find out more El Glaoui the Pasha of Marrakesh El Glaoui the Pasha of Marrakesh T hami el Glaoui Pasha of Marrakesh during the French Protectorate was the last great southern tribal leader a shrewd supporter of colonial rule see The Glaoui and personal friend of Winston

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/africa/morocco/marrakesh/ (2016-02-16)
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  • The Atlantic coast Guide | Nicaragua Travel | Rough Guides
    the coast remains an untouristed tangle of waterways and rainforests and should be approached with caution and negotiated only with the aid of experienced locals and good supplies of food water and insect repellent Indeed there is only one actual town in the northern half of the coast Puerto Cabezas Few travellers make the trip flying is the only real transport option but the impoverished town has a unique feel and is the best access point for the Miskito speaking wildernesses of the northeast The possibilities for ecotourism in this vast isolated coastal region are obvious though a scarcity of resources and a lack of cooperation between central and local government have so far stymied all progress while the long discussed highway linking Managua and Bluefields has failed to leave the drawing board Read More More about Nicaragua Features Where Next Check out The northwest Book a hostel in Nicaragua Travel Offers Travel insurance Hotels Hostels Car hire Tours Explore El Rama Bluefields Pearl Lagoon The Corn Islands Bilwi Puerto Cabezas Find out more History and politics on the Atlantic coast History and politics on the Atlantic coast The Atlantic coast never appealed to the Spanish conquistadors and repelled by disease endless jungle dangerous snakes and persistent biting insects they quickly made tracks for the more hospitable Pacific zone As a result Spanish influence was never as great along this seaboard as elsewhere English French and Dutch buccaneers had been plying the coast since the late 1500s and it was they who first made contact with the Miskito Sumu and Rama peoples who populated the area Today the ethnicity of the region is complex and the east can feel like another country The indigenous peoples mixed with slaves brought from Africa and Jamaica to work in the region s fruit

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/central-america-and-the-caribbean/nicaragua/atlantic-coast/ (2016-02-16)
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  • The Interior Guide | Iceland Travel | Rough Guides
    infinite grey gravel plains glacial rivers and lavafields punctuated only by ice caps volcanoes and jagged mountains Sheep are virtually the only living things that manage to survive here but pasture and vegetation where they do exist comprise only scattered clumps of ragged grass and it s a daunting task for the farmers who venture out into this no man s land to round up their livestock every autumn Historically routes through the Interior were forged in Viking times as a shortcut for those making the journey on horseback to the annual law making sessions at Þingvellir though the region later provided refuge if you can call it that for outlaws who are said to have been pardoned in the unlikely event that they managed to survive here for twenty years Today with the advent of the Ringroad and internal flights the need to traverse this area has long gone and there are no sealed roads just tracks marked by stakes and hardly any bridges across the rivers causing some hairy moments when they are forded The Interior s weather is Iceland at its most elemental Not only can fierce winds whip up the surface layer of loose grit in a matter of seconds turning a beautiful sunny spell into a blinding haze of sand and dirt but snowstorms are common even in July and August The summer here is very short indeed barely a matter of weeks the winter long and severe when the tracks are blocked by deep snowdrifts and closed to traffic The mainstay of accommodation in the Interior is the network of huts or sæluhús run by Iceland s hiking associations The better ones have self catering facilities and running water though all sleeping space is in dorms and you ll need to bring your own

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/europe/iceland/interior/ (2016-02-16)
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  • Things To See and Do In Australia | Rough Guides
    Thailand Turkmenistan United Arab Emirates Uzbekistan Vietnam Australasia Australia Fiji New Zealand Papua New Guinea Samoa Tuvalu Vanuatu Central America the Caribbean Bahamas Belize Bermuda Costa Rica Cuba Dominican Republic El Salvador Grenada Guatemala Jamaica Nicaragua Panama Trinidad Tobago Europe Albania Armenia Austria Belarus Belgium Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnia Herzegovina Bulgaria Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark England Estonia Finland France Georgia Germany Greece Hungary Iceland Ireland Italy Kazakhstan Kosovo Latvia Lithuania Malta Montenegro Netherlands Norway Poland Portugal Romania Russia Scotland Serbia Slovakia Slovenia Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey Ukraine United Kingdom Wales Middle East Abu Dhabi Dubai Iran Israel Jordan Oman Qatar Saudi Arabia North America Canada Greenland Mexico USA South America Argentina Bolivia Brazil Chile Colombia Ecuador Guyana Peru Uruguay Venezuela UK View by Theme Activity Architecture Beaches Belief Boats sailing Budget travel Coasts islands Crafts and markets Cycling Deserts Discovery Diving snorkeling Everyday Life Extreme Adventure sports Family friendly Festivals events Food drink Heritage ruins Indigenous culture Leisure Luxury Mountains Museums art Music National parks reserves Nature Nightlife Novelty Off the beaten track People Photography Railway journeys Relaxation Road trips Romance Shopping Structures Surfing Tourist Trail Tradition Transport Walking trekking Wildlife Winter sports Video Australia s top things not to miss By Site Editor October 30th 2014 View Comments Squeezing all of Australia into one trip would be impossible there are mountains to climb rainforests to hike through and vibrant cities to explore Here s our list of the top things not to miss in Australia from the rust red Outback to golden surf swept beaches Explore more of the world with the Rough Guides YouTube Channel Explore more of Australia with the Rough Guide to Australia Book hostels and don t forget to purchase travel insurance before you go Tags Australasia Australia Discovery Previous Feature Next Feature Travel

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/article/video-australias-top-things-not-to-miss/ (2016-02-16)
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  • The southwest Guide | Nicaragua Travel | Rough Guides
    Around Granada Rivas San Juan del Sur See all destinations Nicaragua The southwest Show Related Guides Hide Related Guides Rough Guides Snapshot Central America on a Budget Nicaragua View Guide The Rough Guide to Central America On a Budget View Guide The Rough Guide to Cuba View Guide The Rough Guide to Jamaica View Guide The Rough Guide to Costa Rica View Guide The Rough Guide to Belize View Guide Rough Guide Audio Phrasebook and Dictionary Latin American Spanish View Guide The Rough Guide to First Time Around The World View Guide The Rough Guide to Guatemala View Guide The Rough Guide to Trinidad Tobago View Guide The majority of Nicaragua s population lives in the fertile southwest of the country Bordered by Lago de Nicaragua to the east and the Pacific to the west and studded with volcanoes Volcán Masaya Volcán Mombacho and the twin cones of Ometepe s Concepción and Maderas the southwest is otherwise a flat low grassy plain home to what is left of Nicaragua s beef industry while coffee plantations can be found at higher altitudes Masaya 29km south of Managua and Granada 26km further south are the region s key cities Masaya s excellent crafts market attracts virtually everyone who comes to Nicaragua while the nearby Parque Nacional Volcán Masaya offers the most accessible volcano viewing in the country The picturesque Pueblos Blancos or White Towns lie on the road connecting Managua Masaya and Granada the latter with its fading classical colonial architecture and lakeside setting is Nicaragua s most beautiful and touristy city and makes a good base for exploring nearby attractions such as the Isletas de Granada and Volcán Mombacho Some 75km south of Granada Rivas the gateway to Costa Rica is of little interest in itself though many travellers pass through

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/destinations/central-america-and-the-caribbean/nicaragua/southwest/ (2016-02-16)
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  • 9 Things to Know About Kosovo | Rough Guides
    the region The 1998 99 conflict communism and Ottoman medieval Serbian Byzantine and Roman periods have left the place with plenty to engage with including a number of UNESCO world heritage sites the Gračanica and Decani monasteries are an essential visit Those wishing to travel back in time should explore Janjeva Nestled in hills 20km south of Pristina its winding cobbled streets and decaying architecture hint at a history of former glory going back to at least the 12th century Go now and you ll be one of the first Gračanica Monastery Prizren is Kosovo s cultural capital The population is an exciting mix of Albanians Turks Roma Ashkali and Serbs and you can walk along the river taking in a variety of influences from Ottoman mosques to old Orthodox and Catholic churches via numerous bustling bars and cafés The annual Docufest a celebration of short films and documentaries is one of the highlights of the year but there are festivals and live street performances throughout the season Ask and you will receive Locals the vast majority of which are Kosovo Albanian go out of their way literally to help you If you ask someone directions you ll inevitably be taken to your destination and should they not know the way they ll phone a friend who does Once asking a local directions to the bus station transpired into a home cooked family meal a bed for the night and then finally a lift to the station for me The service from taxis to bartenders is exceptional and honest Newborn monument by Marc Perry Kosovo exudes youthfulness Not only is this remarkable republic only six years old but also 70 of the population is under 35 This makes for a dynamic fashionable and entrepreneurial culture of businesses bars cafés and trendy restaurants Nightlife varies from sophisticated lounge bars and dance clubs to serene jazz joints and raucous rock bars Classical music connoisseurs might be fortunate enough to find the Kosovo Philharmonic in town And don t miss the most photographed object in the country the inspired Newborn monument a sculpture symbolising a new beginnings The landscape lends itself to adventure Kosovo is a fertile plain surrounded by high mountains with a central spine of rolling hills cutting the flat lands in two With 50 peaks over 2000m there are plenty of opportunities for hikes winter skiing on the snowy tops horseback riding and swimming in natural pools like those at Mirusha waterfalls Image by Marc Perry Tony Blair and Bill Clinton are local heros There are streets and children named after them not to mention a Clinton statue So if you re looking for a different view on the world Kosovo will spin new perspectives The NATO support in the liberation of the Albanian population from the oppressive regime of Slobodan Milošević was regarded as the most successful example of western intervention in recent history This means Brits Americans and others are welcomed with open armed gratitude Be prepared it

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/article/nine-things-to-know-about-kosovo/ (2016-02-16)
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  • Literary Guide To New York | Rough Guides
    in the 1920s at the historic Algonquin Hotel The Algonquin s history reads like a who s who of the past century William Faulkner wrote his 1950 Nobel Prize acceptance speech in one suite Douglas Fairbanks and Orson Welles honeymooned here and Angela Lansbury and Tallulah Bankhead both lived here in their teens Dine on traditional American dishes like New York strip steak and crab cakes at the Round Table Restaurant followed by a night out at the Blue Bar where you can sip cocktails and spout Dorothy Parker bon mots like I shall stay the way I am because I do not give a damn Invisible Man A Memorial to Ralph Ellison Ralph Ellison s novel Invisible Man managed to do the opposite of its title catapulting Ellison the grandson of slaves to the height of visibility Invisible Man won the National Book Award in 1953 and he used his new platform to promote the power of the written word highlighting the importance of books as moral compass Pay tribute to Ellison in Riverside Park where a mighty 15 foot high 10 foot wide bronze monolith titled Invisible Man A Memorial to Ralph Ellison rises at 150th Street Ellison lived right nearby Created by artist Elizabeth Catlett the sculpture features a carved out silhouette of a striding man through which you can see the park s springtime blossoms Washington Square Park The West Village may be famous for its bohemian history but these days it can sometimes be hard to find any trace of it amid the swanky shoe boutiques million dollar brownstones and cupcake shops One way to track down the neighbourhood s rich past is by visiting its literary landmarks like the stately Washington Square Park Over the past century writers and poets have flocked here from Robert Louis Stevenson and Mark Twain in the late 1800s to the Beat poets including Kerouac and Ginsberg who hung out on the breezy benches in 1950s and 60s holding forth on the issues of the day You can further follow in Kerouac s footsteps by staying at the new boutique hotel the Marlton which opened in 2013 Housed in a landmarked building once called the Marlton House dating back to 1900 Kerouac holed up here to write two novellas Pete s Tavern New York is peppered with old bars but only Pete s Tavern in Gramercy Park which opened its doors in 1864 can claim to be the longest continuously operating bar in the city Pete s even managed to stay open through the Prohibition by cannily disguising itself as a flower shop If the dark wood interior looks familiar that s because it has starred in many TV shows from Seinfeld to Law Order But its literary claim to fame goes back a century to the early 1900s when the writer O Henry who lived down the street came here to sip ale and write Legend has it that he penned The Gift of the Magi here comfortably

    Original URL path: http://www.roughguides.com/article/literary-guide-to-new-york/ (2016-02-16)
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