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  • Sal Randolph: Resist the Flattening Effect of Being on Display
    end when a group of artists from France were watching over the office and I was back in the US things got quite wild art everywhere on the walls covering the signs covering everything freely I was also surprised by Frankfurt itself and what a great underground art music scene it had I came to really love the city which was at its best between midnight and 6 am Q It looks like that you had to perform a tremendous amount of work as curator Did you organize everything alone did volunteers show up or mostly the artists organized the events themselves Did you have difficulties to find the appropriate location and ways of display for all the projects A Yes it was certainly a lot of work But of course any big art project is demanding I did all the main organizing myself produced the website and newsletter kept office hours at the Kunstverein communicated with all the artists and hosted visitors etc However each artist was completely responsible for producing their own project all I did was handle their information make a web page copy their flyers promote their events through the calendar and newsletter etc Quite a few artists involved with the project helped out with the office including one who helped me set things up before the show began and several who were in Frankfurt after I had to return to the US in August It s important for me to say here here that I wasn t a curator in any traditional sense to me it was not a curatorial project but rather an artwork in the medium of social organization My aim was to create a structure that acted as transparently as possible which artists could use to meet their own needs for exhibition promotion context connection and bring forward their own intentions and desires Because each artist chose their own location and media I wasn t really responsible for this aspect of things But of course many people asked for help and when possible I did bend the rules to try and help people set things up particularly for people who traveled to Frankfurt to do their projects I might note however that quite a few artists did public space projects in Frankfurt most of them without asking for any kind of official permission and everyone was able to do that kind of work without any difficulty or resistance Q Did Free Manifesta have a budget A Despite the unorthodox nature of my entry in Manifesta 4 they gave me the same budgetary support they gave any of the other artists in my case about 5000 which was mainly used to build and set up the office space make copies of various print materials and for my housing while in Frankfurt Q Besides the official website of the show Manifesta 4 commissioned an alternative web project the e manifesta of the Technology to the People group e manifesta was a bulletin board for announcements and also a space for reflection about the show and contemporary art in general What is your experience about these models of communication A I was very excited by the e manifesta project which also had a physical world component in the Manifesta 4 exhibition area called the Trespassing Space theoretically open for all kinds of community uses I think both had amazing potential Unfortunately however they were rather under used and never gained a real momentum or community base The structures were in place but not the people Q Apparently the Free Manifesta web page was not only a text pool but became also a site of documentation and interaction whilst information was circulated by the Free Manifesta newsletters How many subscribers did the newsletter reach A There are about 500 subscribers to the newsletter which was also published on the website The newsletter also went out to some larger email lists such as the local thing frankfurt com mailing list The website http www freemanifesta org will stay up indefinitely as a kind of catalogue of the show and will continue to give access the work which is ongoing for instance many of the internet and mail art projects Q How does Free Manifesta relate to the concept of gift economy A Free Manifesta was an experiment in creating a small but working gift economy where the artists contributed their work and I contributed structure and organization Over the course of several previous projects involving free art I had become interested in what happens when people give things away Q There wasn t any restrictive criteria to enter Free Manifesta Perhaps the non selection is gave the energy of opposition A Yes I think that was the key for me as well the non selection or self selection But interestingly that kind of openness is not actually typical of traditional gift economies where gifts are usually exchanged within closed circles The idea of a gift economy with open access is something fairly new it borrows one of the better qualities we associate with market based systems I think this is part of what has given internet based gift economies such an energetic quality gifts available to anyone for use gifts that anyone can contribute to It alleviates some of the problematic qualities of the gift obligation dependency social restriction burdensome gifts etc Q Besides the Situationist inspiration of the psychogeorgaphical projects to what extent the projects were critical about capitalist economy and cultural industry A A very large percent of the work was critical either implicitly or explicitly and I think everyone who took part in the show understood it to be an act of resistance to the dominant commercial and institutional paradigm in the art world More than 40 artists gave away a total of several thousand individual art objects These were obviously acts of both generosity and resistance Almost all of the work created especially for Free Manifesta engaged these ideas and much of the

    Original URL path: http://salrandolph.com/text/5/resist-the-flattening-effect-of-being-on-display (2016-04-26)
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  • Sal Randolph: On Free Manifesta (from the Manifesta 4 Catalog)
    thing we expect civilization to value is beauty Sigmund Freud When Money is Free I purchased my place in Manifesta 4 as the high bidder in Christoph Büchel s ebay auction which he called Invite Yourself Ordinarily things that confer social prestige must be received or not received as a kind of gift They cannot be demanded or bought or taken by an act of individual will One is awarded something or invited somewhere it is a passive mode An official place in a biennial is a gift of the curators a gift which the artist returns with the gift of her or his art In the marketplace however you can have whatever you wish as long as you have the money You do not have to persuade or impress someone in order to be allowed to buy what you want in its higher stratospheres the art market interestingly is an exception to this Büchel by auctioning off his participation rights also freed them Participation or belonging is longer tied to the traditional structures of power Free Manifesta Free Manifesta creates an unedited and uncurated space within the larger context of Manifesta 4 a space where any artist who wishes

    Original URL path: http://salrandolph.com/text/4/on-free-manifesta-from-the-manifesta-4-catalog (2016-04-26)
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  • Sal Randolph: Free Show (by Eileen Myles)
    the food line And where did their old clothes go It certainly seems that American democracy is best observed in the ways we dispose The only way I could enter the Protestant churches of my neighborhood when I was growing up was to go to their rummage sales Julian Schnabel found the plates for his famous paintings at the Goodwill on 21st and 8th Ave in New York An art neighborhood Chelsea has since crept up around the site of that purchase The huge flea market on 27th Street nearby is an amazing and expensive array of bicycles furniture and clothes I remember Jim Shaw s Thrift Store paintings turning the heads of the art world in 1993 Not bad paintings that he had made himself but a show of paintings he found over the years He put them on the wall in Metro Pictures and the gesture was stunning In the nineties maybe in reaction to the art boom of the eighties artists began to put more junk in their shows plop a couch or two between the ironic paintings inhabit the gallery space with a living room sensibility spray painted cassette racks one artist leaned an electric guitar against the wall Among other things this new ease reflected the freedom of the artist Her reconstituted relationship to things Part of the act of art is hiding the expense involved in putting up a show Either the gallery or the individual must absorb the considerable outlay for even just printing framing I bet she made a bundle people might sniff walking away from a successful show yet it s always a shot in the dark especially considering the maxed out credit cards of many who either before or after had to go and proofread into the night or teach about art or do contracting jobs whatever the culture will buy from them the invisible sacrifice always exists like a halo around the beautiful show As does the extended community buzzing also hoping to enter the orbit attain the élan of the unique individual capable of conspicuous graceful waste or even be the quick study who managed to sells sea shells by the seashore Jim Shaw s worthless paintings transforming the value of found once and for all or just for a while Because more and more art really isn t what s sold Valuable paintings and sculptures continue to arrive in the key galleries in New York and LA and because of the names and the agreed upon status of their makers the skill of the dealers money does eventually get exchanged but a lot of art these days is just advertising for what A kind of experience for vision Painters began to make films and the world the camera grazes on continues the values and beliefs and aesthetic of what has already come to be disparagingly known as wall art Everyone more and more everyday is obsessed with vision That s what the painter turned filmmaker wants to

    Original URL path: http://salrandolph.com/text/3/free-show-by-eileen-myles (2016-04-26)
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  • Sal Randolph: love
    greg org Art in Odd Places Fia Backström Regine Basha Bureau of Inverse Technology D Graham Burnett Cabinet Cage Collective Foundation Conflux Joseph Del Pesco Jen Delos Reyes Jeff Dolven Craig Dworkin EPRAM Flux Factory Kenneth Goldsmith Kunstverein NY Lori Gordon He said She said Hope Hilton David Horvitz Information as Material Kathe Izzo Lemonhound Raimundas Malašauskas Abinadi Meza Mildred s Lane Minus Space J Morgan Puett Newsgrist Graham Parker

    Original URL path: http://salrandolph.com/love/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Sal Randolph: Dispersed Holdings
    Holdings Dispersed Holdings is now on Soundcloud Just a taste of a new project that has been in the works more to come Set recorded live with Sal Randolph David Richardson and Audra Wolowiec at Audra Wolowiec s studio November

    Original URL path: http://salrandolph.com/news/147/dispersed-holdings (2016-04-26)
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  • Sal Randolph: Free Money at Wave Pool Cincinnati
    themselves how much the pieces are worth The series calls into question the value of labor Are the pieces worth the same small wage per hour of artistic labor that the IKEA factory workers are paid to create them Or are they worth the minimum wage in Ohio Or perhaps some other artistic value is placed on them because they live as art pieces Lauren DiCioccio and Jeremiah Jenkins both San Francisco Bay Area artists both use ubiquitous items of day to day life to draw attention to and further derive meaning from these objects DiCioccio s pieces in this show focus on the monotonous quality of currency heightening these objects through hand embroidery in a way that is both playful and intimate Jenkins has several works in the show that use actual modes of currency credit cards and check books to create altogether different items to create surprising connections and messages regarding the financial system New York based artist Sal Randolph is more interested in the social interactions that come when money is involved Her work Free Money which will be featured in the exhibition calls into question the etiquette surrounding free money and uses a social practice format to explore this issue JEFF GORDON and Kevin White both have works in the show that examine artistic labor as work JEFF GORDON an artist duo from Los Angeles created an 8 hour film which condenses their full workday as artists into a typical 8 hour work day Their workday which includes art making administrative duties teaching and other jobs overtakes their entire day from the time they wake up until the time they go to bed This film reflects on what it means to be an artist and how the standard 8 hour work day that labor unions fought

    Original URL path: http://salrandolph.com/news/145/free-money-at-wave-pool-cincinnati (2016-04-26)
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  • Sal Randolph: ESTAR(SER) December 3 at Harvard
    the early 1940s Willing attendees will have an opportunity to experiment with the techniques of figuration that seem to be at issue in these puzzling sources From ESTAR SER A bundle of 22 sheets rolled into a tube and tied with twine the Nachtigall Convolute derives its name from a shared saliency of the documents thusly cylindricated the majority allude conspicuously to an unnamed personage by means of a fetching cryptonym to wit Nachtigall the German term for that familiar and musical bird known in English as the nightingale Do these materials bear on the historicity of the Order of the Third Bird It seems likely Did this cosmopolitan cohort engage in ritualized practices of sustained attention to made things There is evidence they did And is it possible that their activities included the hitherto unattested effort to attend to an object not actually present which is to say a missing or lost object Here is where things become urgent ESTAR SER is an established body of private independent scholars who work collectively to recover scrutinize and where relevant draw attention to the historicity of the Order of the Third Bird The Nachtigall Convolute Working Group for this occasion consists

    Original URL path: http://salrandolph.com/news/144/december-3-at-harvard-estarser (2016-04-26)
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  • Sal Randolph: Poem in Dream Closet
    DREAM CLOSET Meditations on childhood space Edited by Matthew Burgess Fresh off the press is our new title Dream Closet Meditations on Childhood Space edited by Matthew Burgess Burgess a poet children s book author and magical thinker has brought together 50 writers and visual artists to respond to the topic of childhood spaces These small spaces may be sites of solitary reverie of privacy of escape of aesthetic or

    Original URL path: http://salrandolph.com/news/146/poem-in-dream-closet (2016-04-26)
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