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  • The F-35 and Advanced Sensor Fusion
    what s on the ground The F 35 also has color weather radar For the pilot who is trying to get through thunderstorms squall lines and fronts the color weather radar is important and marks a first for fighters Most of the time fusion commands the radar to detect and track targets without much if any pilot involvement Fusion uses the radar as one of its inputs and displays the result to the pilot and shares fused tracks with the other F 35s on the network The Distributed Aperture System The Distributed Aperture System DAS is a new and unique sensor The DAS is comprised of six staring focal point arrays These are infrared cameras flush mounted on the skin of the airplane which detect the entire sphere around the airplane that s 4 pi steradians for the mathematically inclined The entire sphere is about 41 000 square degrees whereas the radar sees about 10 000 square degrees There is an intersection of the two sensors however Where they re both looking through the same angular volume of space fusion will work them synergistically and they can queue each other Fusion really does the queuing As soon as one sensor detects something fusion then queues every other sensor to look along that line of sight and try to find information about the track The impressive thing is that this occurs without pilot involvement When fusion recognizes a DAS track is in the same angular space as the radar it will indicate to the Radar Radar go look along this line of sight and get range on this track that DAS found Or if the radar has a track and it gimbals or in other words the track goes beyond the radar s field of regard fusion will tell DAS You keep updating this and hold onto the track for the pilot until it comes back into the field of regard of the radar or comes back into the field of regard of some other sensor on the airplane according to Skaff It is this synergy of the sensors onboard the airplane and the fact that the fusion engine is doing this for the pilot which results in a manageable cockpit workload These things are laborious for the pilot to control manually but are easy for a computer to control algorithmically The F 35 is returning the pilot to the role of tactician The DAS performs a number of functions It does short range situation awareness infrared search and track IRST For the pilot the days of someone sneaking up on him are almost gone In clear air it can detect and track other airplanes by their thermal signature It also does missile launch detection which is its primary function It s tuned to a spectrum such that it can see rocket motors If it detects a launch it will say Launch right 2 00 low according to Dr Skaff Note the systems really do annunciate this message to the pilot

    Original URL path: http://www.sldinfo.com/whitepapers/the-f-35-and-advanced-sensor-fusion/ (2016-02-13)
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  • An Overview of The F-35 Cockpit
    resulting picture is 10 inches by 7 inches or 70 square inches of space The pilot can have up three different TSDs with two being displayed simultaneously F 35 pilots will all see the same fused picture on their displays As an individual airplane builds the picture it is across the high bandwidth data link the Multifunction Advanced Data Link or MADL link In legacy airplanes pilots used radios to provide the communication links and to shape the collective understanding of the battlespace With the F 35 it is the Common Operational Picture or COP that is shared visually Another aspect that enhances awareness is the use of the same symbols across the service and international fleets of F 35s In legacy fighter cockpits there are often different and unique symbol sets There s a lot of learning and a high potential for misunderstanding as pilots communicate Whether pilots are flying an A B or C model they use the exact same symbol set With the F 35 pilots are speaking the same language no matter their service or nation and using the exact same terms to describe what they re seeing and how they re interacting with the display It s very graphical and very clear to the fleet Its simplicity and standardization will enable ground commanders to easily use the pilot s picture above for an improved perspective on the battlefield This benefit will allow pilots to exchange data with command and control on the ground In an era where working with allies is a core requirement the F 35 is a key coalition enabler and the common cockpit will be a critical aspect of the integration process With current fleets when pilots conduct Red Flag exercises with allies when they participate in debriefings they re all seeing a different picture in their displays And with the F 35 that all changes The F 35 allows pilots to see the same picture ensuring they re on the same page The helmet is an extension of the panoramic cockpit display The head up symbols are like those used head down It blends seamlessly with what s head down and heads up In addition to symbology the pilot can select imagery from the distributed aperture system This imagery is captured from sensors surrounding the aircraft giving the pilot 360 degrees of situational awareness Simply put the pilot can use the helmet to look through the airplane and into the battlespace Currently the helmet is working well but with any new technology there are developmental challenges Mitigation pathways for the issues facing the helmet have been developed and are being implemented The fact is that the helmet is already in use and the reviews from the pilots are overwhelmingly positive One pilot went so far as to say I could fly the whole mission with a helmet bag over the top of my head and just look through the sensors and fly the airplane safely Another pilot recently stated I wouldn

    Original URL path: http://www.sldinfo.com/whitepapers/an-overview-of-the-f-35-cockpit-what-5th-generation-aircraft-are-all-about/ (2016-02-13)
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  • The F-35 Cockpit: Enabling the Pilot as a Tactical Decision Maker
    in the cockpit The PVI was designed by pilot for pilots This design approach views the pilot at the center of the of the air vehicle From this point of view two control and feedback loops exist 1 the internal loop and 2 the external loop The external loop is the one featured in Top Gun This is the fly and fight loop but the internal loop is equally important The internal loop is all about getting the air vehicle safely into and out of battlespace This is required in order to fly and fight The fifth slide provides a visual of the F 35 cockpit display The PCD is the first thing which the casual observer notices about the F 35 cockpit The PCD is a contiguous 20 x 8 inch surface which is composed of two physical 10 x 8 inch displays for redundancy This display space may be configured based on pilot needs into 12 windows of various and content location and size The larger windows are referred to as portals There are four portals The small windows at along the bottom are secondary windows and there are 8 of them The entire surface may be controlled through touch cursor hooking or voice control Upon closer inspection of the cockpit most recognize the paucity of switches and instruments In fact many pilots say this is the most naked cockpit in history this is not true the Wright flyer had fewerswitches During the initial design everything was removed from the cockpit volume and had to earn its way back into the cockpit based on combat value added Combat value means it must contribute directly to lethality survivability and be cost effective Cost effective is bang for the buck The sixth slide shows the JSF conceptual display The initial implementation of the PCD was one physical display of 16 x 9 inches This design had three portals and 6 secondary windows The design worked but pilots asked for another portal The seventh and slides show the F 35 panoramic cockpit display The current F 35 looks like this In this example the pilot has configured the PCD into 4 portals with 6 secondary windows There are 5 portal configurations which the pilot can program prior during mission planning Once airborne it is extremely easy to use the touchscreen to re configure PCD For the eighth slide we see three portals and 4 secondary windows Portal one on the left is a large Tactical Situation Display TSD It is onto the format that fusion presents its view of battlespace All F 35s share this view and contribute to its content This is also the primary location that the pilot interactswith the air vehicle to sort and target The two portals on the right are showing sensor data In this case the Electro optical Targeting System EOTS and the Synthetic Aperture Radar SAR The ninth and tenth slides focus upon the mission reconfigurable aspect of the cockpit The Mission Reconfigurable Cockpit

    Original URL path: http://www.sldinfo.com/whitepapers/the-f-35-cockpit-enabling-the-pilot-as-a-tactical-decision-maker/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Supply Chain Management Innovation: Building Smart Networks
    21st century military and security operations A key element of such reforms has been building when and where possible into the supply chain sensors which allow an ability to track the movement of parts and where possible building a life cycle understanding of key parts as well A market leader in shaping innovative approaches to leveraging sensors to generate operational intelligence for more effective supply chain management is GlobeRanger a Fujitsu company based in Richardson Texas We are looking at the challenge of logistics and supply chain reform and are examining the approach of GlobeRanger to leveraging sensors and software to yield significant improvement in supply and logistics chain management In this white paper the CEO of the company George Brody explains the underlying approach which can yield a significant strategic inflection point for the defense sector as well as the commercial sector According to Andy Grove former Chairman of Intel Corporation there are strategic inflection points in businesses technologies and the life of a company These inflection points are a convergence of forces making sudden and rapid change inevitable and they create full scale changes in the way business is conducted By this definition the next inflection point could

    Original URL path: http://www.sldinfo.com/whitepapers/supply-chain-management-innovation-building-smart-networks/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Evolving Business Models: The Case of Marshall Aerospace
    com about us people executive team steve fitz gerald Excerpts from the interview are included in this piece and more of the interview will be published in the next issue of Soutien Logistique et Defense being published for this year s Paris Air Show In the interview the Marshall team underscored their approach to partnership As the CEO underscored We provide integrated operations support through our partnerships with Original Equipment Manufacturers OEMs we ve never had our own products so we work closely with the OEMs and the government customers we are always looking for partnership and we re not looking necessarily to be the dominant player We want to be offering the best value we can in partnership with our customers and suppliers The Marshall CEO emphasized that given the company provides its expertise in partnership it is focused on tailoring its support to the customer requirements For example in Canada we brought about 80 engineers where we work with a company called Cascade who are the prime contractor and we ve got white collar engineers working in Canada Conversely in places like Holland where we have a small office we re delivering an offset commitment wherever we are in the world we have to pick what s appropriate to the customers needs The advantage of being a small organization was highlighted throughout the interview as well as not being an OEM If they were an OEM the OEM partners which they have in support contracts would be concerned about intellectual property leakage In a relationship with Marshall they simply don t have that concern According to the CEO We re very flexible in our approach We don t have defined business model that we can t deviate from And we re quite flexible in terms of our approach

    Original URL path: http://www.sldinfo.com/whitepapers/evolving-business-models-the-case-of-marshall-aerospace/ (2016-02-13)
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  • The Weaponization of the F-35
    is laying the foundation to both work with and shape the developmental approach to new weapons We are starting to see advancements in net enabled weapons Indeed weapons and unmanned vehicles have much in common They re getting smarter and smarter which means as we drop them it s not a dumb bomb anymore it s got wings and control surfaces It uses a robust interface to the jet before it was dropped and it will probably use an advanced datalink to interface back to the jet while it s in flight We ll start to see the weapon manufacturers design and build weapons which fit in the F 35 s bays The bays are big enough and the airplane is designed from a foundation which can be grown over the life of the jet Remember the concept of a software defined jet This is the payoff We are poised to talk to smarter and smarter and more advanced weapons Indeed the fusion engine and the ability of the aircraft come together to create a new developmental environment for weapons evolution It can be a fleet wide operational use of the weapons rather than just platform a single plane specific or even platform specific We have a 5 th Generation foundation and now as the weapons makers develop 5th Generation weapons we re ready to carry them and to employ them and they ll be part of the synergy We talked earlier before about the common operational picture COP The weapons will be part of the COP before they re dropped out of the airplane We can download the relevant items from the COP to the weapon such that it knows what environment it is being released into and depending on specific weapons development the weapon will dialogue with the fleet and perhaps be controlled by the fleet This could mean that re programmability in flight becomes an option and with that option a much more effective use of weapons against targets Additionally this technology allows for controllability of the weapons in constrained operational environments Pilots have joked about their weapons being little skinny wingman Well now they are truly like wingman as we send them off into the battle space They begin to glean information and send data back to us in the same way that 5 th Generation airplanes can go ahead of the 4 th Generation and begin to identify battle space and send that information back to the 4th Generation aircraft Enhanced synergy and effectiveness of the combat systems enterprise is the result The common fleet not only impacts on operational capabilities and flexibility but affects the very ability to design build and deploy new weapons Economies of scale and economies of commonality are key drivers for the next generation of weapons The F 35 program involves three U S services eight partners and others coming onboard What s good for one is good for all When we come together and decide we want to integrate

    Original URL path: http://www.sldinfo.com/whitepapers/the-weaponization-of-the-f-35/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Thales: Solutions Tailored To Operational Missions
    and Security Logs Sustainment Strategy Video Slideshow About Us Contributors Who We Are Global Partners Privacy Policy Terms Conditions Send Us Feedback Store Defense Security Publications Media Kits Focus Industry Advertising White Paper Media Kit ICSA D S Advisory Services A White Paper By Thales March 7th 2012 Thales Solutions Tailored To Operational Missions Defense Aerospace Customer Support and Service This SlideShowPro photo gallery requires the Flash Player plugin and

    Original URL path: http://www.sldinfo.com/whitepapers/thales-solutions-tailored-to-operational-missions/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Adversity and strategy: two sides of the same concept
    building a strategy that takes account of the conditions for exercising their activities When these conditions are contrary we talk about adversity But would there need strategy if there was no adversity Operational activities are never guided by the struggle against adversity even in emergency services close protection services or in combat they are guided by the achievement of a goal and only the strategist is concerned with the overall protection of the activity giving mission to protection services to protect The strategist is therefore crucially facing adversity opposing to his objectives Rear Admiral Lionel John Jarvis Assistance Chief of Defence Staff Health Surgeon General of the Royal Navy and Chief Naval Medical Officer speaking with Captain Jan Cedric Hansen DCSSA doctor and MEDCO director of strategies Eurosatory 2010 Medco StratAdviser as a specialist of the management of the strategic know how applied to open situations intervenes throughout its entities MEDCO and DI2M in all stages of the work against adversity Identification and characterization of operational situations against targets Topology of the dangers in which those being threats especially outside the usual dangers of the activity Anticipations preparation Proactive communication Training to the unexpected Resilience Readiness care throughout change follow

    Original URL path: http://www.sldinfo.com/whitepapers/adversity-and-strategy-two-sides-of-the-same-concept/ (2016-02-13)
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