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  • Stuart's Photography - » Taff Vale Railway (Modern-day Valley Lines)
    to be transformed into a public park His offer was for the northern section of the park and subsequently a Mr Emile Andrews agreed to provide the land to the south of Mr Hailey s to form a single park Work began in 1925 and the park was opened on 3rd May 1926 forming a great open area that only became even more important when Cardiff Corporation closed the Glamorganshire Canal and built the Gabalfa housing estate Today the park is home to Llandaff North Rugby Club and the Taff Trail cycle route snakes its way up from the south west to the north east corner of the park A local community group works closely with the city council to improve the park but unfortunately they keep hitting setbacks as local yobs disrupt and vandalise the park The railway embankment that ran across the park is gone and the line of trees that run down the south east corner edge of the park is the last reminder to mark the route that the canal once took References Hailey Park A History Hailey Park on the Cardiff Council website Friends of Hailey Park Glamorgan Canal photos History of Llandaff North RFC TVR Other Structures including information about the line through Hailey Park Hailey Park Tennis Courts Get A Makeover Hailey Park Arson Attack Copyright c Stuart Herbert blog twitter photography all facebook Merthyr Road project all If you re reading this in the RSS feed my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken Unfortunately I haven t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed so for now you ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map Sorry Be the first to leave a comment Merthyr Road Silliness At Sardis Road Posted by Stuart Herbert on July 30th 2010 in Modern Photos Pontypridd Shoot Taff Vale Railway Modern day Valley Lines There are several stations along the old Taff Vale Railway that provide park and ride facilities most notably at Trefforest and Taffs Well Sadly despite being one of the major towns along the route arguably the most major other than Merthyr at one end and Cardiff at the other Pontypridd does not provide such a scheme What we have instead is the car park at Sardis Road It s a pay and display car park but the all day parking charges are pretty reasonable And on Sundays and Bank Holidays car parking is free There s just a couple of problems with that First of all the car park is only open from 7am to 7pm If you re a commuter who needs to be heading into Cardiff before 7am you can t park here And if you re a commuter who can t be sure of making it back to rescue the car on time you can park here but you ll have to come back the following day to rescue your car Secondly as the sign says the gates are locked at 7pm Monday to Saturday So how exactly are you supposed to park for free on a Sunday if the gates are still locked Just to be certain that it wasn t a mistake on the one sign I popped down to the other sign and checked that too They are consistent The locked gates on a Sunday also means that the recycling bins hosted in the car park aren t easily accessible if you re too old or otherwise infirm to carry the waste from the road I m sure that Rhondda Cynon Taff council must have good reasons for these restrictions but they are very commuter unfriendly Commuters needing to drive to the railway station are probably much better off driving to Trefforest or Taffs Well especially if you re likely to have to work late unexpectedly or if you need to commute on a Sunday Copyright c Stuart Herbert blog twitter photography all facebook Merthyr Road project all If you re reading this in the RSS feed my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken Unfortunately I haven t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed so for now you ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map Sorry Be the first to leave a comment Merthyr Road Cathays Station Sign Behind Grilled Fence Posted by Stuart Herbert on July 20th 2010 in Cardiff Glamorganshire Canal Modern Photos Shoot Taff Vale Railway Modern day Valley Lines In the foreground is the fencing on the western side of Cathays Railway Station Across the tracks is the bold red Cathays railway station sign It s pleasing to my eye at least that although Arriva Trains Wales has painted the rest of the station in their hard on the eye turquoise they ve left the pole of the station sign in the original Valley Lines green colour Copyright c Stuart Herbert blog twitter photography all facebook Merthyr Road project all If you re reading this in the RSS feed my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken Unfortunately I haven t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed so for now you ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map Sorry Be the first to leave a comment Merthyr Road Alert Treforest Estate Posted by Stuart Herbert on July 19th 2010 in Glamorganshire Canal Modern Photos Shoot Taff Vale Railway Modern day Valley Lines Taffs Well I couldn t help but chuckle when I noticed this sign appear at Taffs Well railway station Has there been a problem with train crews forgetting to stop at the Treforest Estate railway station I wonder or is it simply that we do have dragons in Wales after all that Treforest Estate is where they

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/photography/category/taff-vale-railway-modern-day-valley-lines/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Stuart's Photography - » Taffs Well
    trees beyond can make for eye catching scenes such as this but I imagine that if you re cycling rather than walking you d probably miss them as you whizz by Does anyone know what this sign might be I spotted it half buried in the undergrowth along the route Is it a left over from when the railway was here or something unrelated I ve no idea what this metal post s original function was It stands by the route and is happily rusting away If you can shed some light onto this please leave a comment below I m a bit of a sucker for textures especially when they contrast with a soft background like this one does Here are some old posts I m guessing they were railway fence posts from back in the day standing beside the Taff Trail as it runs along the route of the former Rhymney Railway As you can see this particular stretch is long straight and very green with not a lot to see Not far from the start of Penrhos Cutting the other Taff Trail route which runs along the old Barry Railway line that used to go over Walnut Tree Viaduct joins the Rhymney Railway route I m planning on covering the other Taff Trail route at a later date When you get to Penrhos Cutting the trail goes under this bridge I ll talk about the bridge more in the next photo What you re seeing isn t rain It was a very dry very sunny day and when I angled my Nikon D300s up towards the sun these strange streaks of purple light appeared on the image I think it looks better as black and white but if anyone really wants me to I ll upload the colour original for you to see for yourself A little saner than my last shot here s the bridge at Penrhos Cutting that the Taff Trail goes under before its climb up Nantgarw Hill It doesn t take a lot to imagine local boys standing up on the bridge waiting to be engulfed as a steam train huffs and puffs its way up the valley from Walnut Tree Junction Maybe the driver blew the train s whistle for them as his train passed by It s a romanticism that our modern railways with their sealed carriages and grumbling motors simply can t compete with Who knows when oil finally starts to run out maybe we ll all be forced back to a second age of steam At the foot of Penrhos Cutting the intrepid explorer has a choice He can continue along the Taff Trail cycle route 8 to Nantgarw and on to Pontypridd or he can continue to follow the old Rhymney Railway line up Nantgarw Hill and into Penrhos Cutting If you leave the Taff Trail and decide to continue to follow the Rhymney Railway route up Nantgarw Hill instead this takes you into Penrhos Cutting and on to Caerphilly At the far end of the cutting approx 2 miles stands Penrhos Junction which I ll cover at a later date Copyright c Stuart Herbert blog twitter photography all facebook Merthyr Road project all If you re reading this in the RSS feed my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken Unfortunately I haven t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed so for now you ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map Sorry 3 comments Merthyr Road Restored Bridge At Taffs Well Posted by Stuart Herbert on July 22nd 2010 in By Water Historical Photos River Taff Shoot Taffs Well This footbridge over the River Taff between Taffs Well and Gwaelod y Garth has recently been renovated and restored into a fantastic condition Copyright c Stuart Herbert blog twitter photography all facebook Merthyr Road project all If you re reading this in the RSS feed my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken Unfortunately I haven t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed so for now you ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map Sorry Be the first to leave a comment Merthyr Road Alert Treforest Estate Posted by Stuart Herbert on July 19th 2010 in Glamorganshire Canal Modern Photos Shoot Taff Vale Railway Modern day Valley Lines Taffs Well I couldn t help but chuckle when I noticed this sign appear at Taffs Well railway station Has there been a problem with train crews forgetting to stop at the Treforest Estate railway station I wonder or is it simply that we do have dragons in Wales after all that Treforest Estate is where they lie in wait to snack on passing trains Copyright c Stuart Herbert blog twitter photography all facebook Merthyr Road project all If you re reading this in the RSS feed my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken Unfortunately I haven t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed so for now you ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map Sorry Be the first to leave a comment Merthyr Road Walnut Tree Viaduct Posted by Stuart Herbert on June 30th 2010 in Barry Railway Coal Historical Photos River Taff Shoot Taffs Well One of the surviving pillars the one you can see from the A470 of the Walnut Tree Viaduct reflected in the River Taff Built in 1901 the Walnut Tree Viaduct so called because it crossed the Taff Vale Railway above Walnut Tree Junction at the southern end of modern day Taffs Well carried the Barry Railway 120 feet in the air across the Taff Gap from the Lesser Garth to the other side What a view it must have

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/photography/category/taffs-well/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Stuart's Photography - » Technique
    a block because it s rare for me to get a block of time on any one thing these days with the nature of my job I m not saying that I don t listen to the conference speakers but my attention is certainly divided at best Not this time and not just because the laptop stayed in the hotel room all day Trying to find the right photos for each speaker meant being in the moment with them it meant listening to them properly It also meant not scrambling around for power half way through the day I used an iPad all day to be part of the conference conversation on Twitter which didn t get charged until I got home late the following day Marvellous thing the iPad is The end result was a great day for me some faltering first steps at conference photography and I actually learned quite a bit too by following the speakers more closely than in previous years Copyright c Stuart Herbert Blog Twitter Facebook Photography Merthyr Road Daily Desktop Wallpaper 25 9 Twitter 4 comments Aperture 3 Workflow Tutorial Slides Posted by Stuart Herbert on August 17th 2010 in Equipment Technique I recently updated my Aperture workflow tutorial for Aperture v3 and posted the slides up on Slideshare net Aperture 3 workflow View more presentations from Stuart Herbert It contains a detailed walkthrough of the steps that I follow every time I process photos to share on this blog and on Flickr I hope you find it useful 8 comments Aperture Workflow Tutorial Posted by Stuart Herbert on June 23rd 2007 in Photos Technique View a larger version of this photo on Flickr or on black Download the Aperture Workflow tutorial PDF 3 1M When it comes to digital photography everyone always puts so much emphasis on the workflow the tasks that are done and the order that they are done in There is no OneTrueWorkflow tm that suits everyone Workflows are very definitely horses for courses You have to find your own way of doing things that suits the way you do photography the amount of time available to you and the results you want After six months now of using Aperture the way I use Aperture has settled down into a fairly consistent pattern Using the simple but effective ScreenSteps I ve put together a short tutorial with screenshots showing what I did in Aperture to create the final image and publish it on Flickr If you ve just moved to Aperture from iPhoto or Photoshop Elements or from Picasa et al on Windows I hope it gives you a way to start using Aperture that you can adapt over time to make your own I m not a professional photographer but I don t buy into the idea that Aperture is just for professional photographers either Please leave below any tips or comments about workflow in Aperture I m always keen to learn how I can improve on what I m doing especially if it saves time or results in a better final image 2 comments Weaning Off Of Automatic Mode Posted by Stuart Herbert on March 18th 2007 in Technique They say that buses come in threes and this month I ve had three friends asking me how to take the first steps away from their cameras automatic mode commonly called Program Mode on Nikon cameras and start taking photos like real photographers It seems like the perfect topic to start a new series of posts about photographic technique so here goes First off just a disclaimer before I go any further I don t want anyone thinking I m something that I m not I m very definitely an amateur photographer I ve had no formal training and I m certainly not qualified to teach photography If you want to know how things should be done so to speak then enroll on a course I m sure that there ll be plenty of suitable night courses in your area and of course there is always Amateur Photographer s home study course Or you could pick up a good book by a real expert I always recommend Michael Langford s Basic Photography What I m talking about here in these Technique posts are how I work with the camera and what works for me If you re okay with that then read on What Is Automatic Mode A camera s automatic mode is exactly what it sounds like you point the camera at what you want to photograph and the camera makes all the other decisions for you Most compact digital cameras only have an automatic mode Larger digital SLRs all come with automatic modes as well as the ability for you to take more control should you wish SLRs have built in databases of many thousands of photographic scenes and it s often said that SLRs can make better decisions than many photographers Using automatic mode is point and shoot photography And there s nothing wrong with it Don t think for a minute that you re not a real photographer just because you currently use automatic mode I don t even know what a real photographer is or why anyone would want to be one If you re taking photos on automatic mode and you re happy with the results then be happy What Does Automatic Mode Do There are two key decisions that automatic mode makes for you It controls the size of the iris photographers call this the aperture in the camera lens The iris controls the amount of light that the camera sees and has the side effect of controlling the angle that the light hits your camera s sensor It also controls how long in time that the camera sees the light from the lens There is a blackout screen inside the camera called the shutter When the shutter is open your camera sees light The longer the shutter is open the

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/photography/category/technique/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Stuart's Photography - » Tin Works
    housing estate that has replaced the Tin Works At the southern end of the housing estate the Feeder re emerges from underground where the Melingriffith Water Pump stands The Pump was originally designed to pump water from the Feeder into the Canal at Melingriffith Lock Rowson Wright s The Glamorganshire and Aberdare Canals Volume II has an entire chapter devoted to the many disputes between the Tin Works and the Canal over the supply of water As I understand it the Tin Works ran entirely on water throughout its history water that the Canal itself also needed as Melingriffith was the last point where the Canal could gather additional water needed for the section down to Sea Lock Today the Canal has been totally obliterated Ty Mawr Road has replaced the Canal here down into Whitchurch and the Feeder just empties back into the Taff beside the Valley Lines railway bridge just south of Radyr Station Melingriffith is a great example of the huge contrast that exists between Cardiff and the Taff Vale in the regeneration of the former industrial sites Most of the route of the Canal through Cardiff was industrialised but today you wouldn t know it The Canal has gone and the industry has been replaced by the housing estates of Melingriffith Gabalfa and Talybont plus the regeneration of Cardiff Bay In the Taff Vale the Canal has mostly disappeared under the A470 trunk road but where it hasn t the land has mostly just been left unused until you reach Rhydycar at Merthyr Tydfil and the site of the local Welsh Assembly Government office It s a story that mirrors the growth of Cardiff against the decline of Merthyr Thoughts On The Day I d travelled through the Melingriffith housing estate a couple of years ago cycling the Taff Trail but back then I d never heard of the Tin Works or the Feeder or really of the Canal itself I d stopped at the Water Pump and read the excellent tourist sign that goes with it but without any background knowledge I didn t really understand what I was looking at I didn t know that Oak Cottage on the other side of the road was the old lockkeeper s cottage from Melingriffith Lock or that the road itself is where Melingriffith Lock once stood I didn t know that the Water Pump stands in the Melingriffith Feeder whose route can be traced back up to the River Taff at Radyr Weir And I didn t know that the Feeder was also used as a canal with its own lock on the River Taff itself years before the Glamorganshire Canal was constructed If you want to explore this area for yourself I recommend parking at the southern end of the Glamorganshire Canal Local Nature Reserve There s a small car park there Head north into the Reserve cross the Canal overflow bridge and follow both the Feeder and Canal until the Feeder starts to veer off to the left Follow the Feeder all the way up to the River Taff Here you can see the sluice gate mechanism that once regulated the flow of water into the Feeder and the remains of the lock Turn south past Radyr Weir and its picnic area and follow the Taff Trail down until it threads its way through the Melingriffith housing estate to Oak Cottage and the Water Pump If you wish there s a muddy footpath down the Feeder s east bankside that you can follow down to the River Taff and beyond but that s really a walk for another day At the Water Pump turn north and follow the road which lies on top of the old canal bed back up to the car park The whole walk will take an hour or two and should be suitable for most people The Feeder is just one of the delights to explore in this area There s the Canal itself which can be followed up to Longwood Drive and further north up to Tongwynlais as covered in another article From Longwood Drive there s the disused Cardiff Railway route down to Coryton which also makes for a great walk And all of these walks are set in the Local Nature Reserve which includes two purpose built hides for watching the local wildlife without disturbing it Favourite Photo From The Shoot From the two visits I made to Melingriffith I came away with 305 photos according to Aperture Even allowing for the fact I now bracket every shot so divide that number by 3 that s still a lot of photos It was a tough challenge cutting it down to the 26 photos I finally uploaded to Flickr Picking just one photo as a favourite was harder still In the end this photo showing the Glamorganshire Canal flowing down into the Melingriffith Feeder is my favourite photo from this shoot It s a photo that s a bit different for a start I m willing to wager there aren t too many other shots of this scene currently around I love the colours too I think it s a great advert for what my new Nikon 18 135mm lens can do more on that lens in a dedicated article later in the year Post Production The photos for this shoot come from two separate visits to the area Because you have the Canal the Cardiff Railway the River Taff and the Taff Trail all in the same area some of the shots are going to be included in other shoots in the future Rather than lump all these shots into a single folder I decided to spend a lot of Mother s Day tagging my photos in Aperture with a view to building a set of Smart Albums based on the tags Aperture is a great tool but if there s one thing that Apple has overlooked it s the very simple operation of being able to

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/photography/category/tin-works/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Stuart's Photography - » Tongwynlais
    before I have enough photos to publish as a complete shoot To complete the walk leave the canal by the path that leads up the steps and follow the path around the north side of the Esso petrol station This path takes you over a footbridge onto Coryton Roundabout which is fun to explore and out the other side over another footbridge back to the A4054 and into Tongwynlais Although all the paths in this section of the walk are modern and tarmac I managed to lose my footing at one point a combination of muddy boots and water running down the slope of the path Once you re off the roundabout and back in Tongwynlais you should be fine Overall the walk s easy going with no major inclines to worry infrequent walkers There s one set of steps immediately after leaving the canal and the paths are muddy at this time of year You get to see two surviving sections of what was once one of the most important canals in the whole United Kingdom and the early heart of the industrialised South Wales Valleys before the trains took over plus the remains of a bridge that used to carry one of those railways up into the valleys That s not bad for a Sunday stroll Favourite Photo From The Shoot Although the photograph of the Iron Bridge has quickly become the most viewed photograph from this shoot I personally prefer this photo Although it was hardly difficult I m still pleased that I managed to find some remains of the bridge that I set out to find on this walk Further up the valley there are many places where there isn t a single trace of the canal or the bridges that used to cross it Don t get me wrong the A470 makes a huge difference to folks like me who live up in the valleys but there hasn t been any noticable effort apart from the Nantgarw Pottery to preserve at least some memory of the industrial heritage of the 1800 s Maybe even these few remains will be gone within my lifetime it s nice to have a record of what s there today in case they re gone tomorrow Three Lessons From The Shoot Although I originally wanted to pick out specific photography techniques from each shoot the truth is that I don t pay all that much attention to technique when I m out and about I mind the basics shutter speed vs focal length for sharpness and aperture for depth of field and then forget about them The section has never lived up to its Three Techniques name so from now on Three Lessons it is Instead I ll be posting regular mid week articles on individual photography techniques which will include technical skills starting with weening off automatic mode ideas about composition and the workflow I follow for getting my photos from the camera through Aperture and up onto Flickr

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/photography/category/tongwynlais/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Stuart's Photography - » Tonteg
    yet in the RSS feed so for now you ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map Sorry Be the first to leave a comment Merthyr Road Rusting Post Posted by Stuart Herbert on March 15th 2011 in A473 Barry Railway Church Village Modern Tonteg Seen during a recent visit to Tonteg Junction a former railway route converted into the Church Village bypass At the time of publishing Google Maps still shows Tonteg Junction as it was before the construction of the bypass began Copyright c Stuart Herbert Blog Twitter Facebook Photography Merthyr Road Daily Desktop Wallpaper 25 9 Twitter If you re reading this in the RSS feed my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken Unfortunately I haven t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed so for now you ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map Sorry Be the first to leave a comment Merthyr Road Danger Of Death Posted by Stuart Herbert on March 14th 2011 in A473 Barry Railway Church Village Modern Tonteg Seen during a recent visit to Tonteg Junction a former railway route converted into the Church Village bypass At the time of publishing Google Maps still shows Tonteg Junction as it was before the construction of the bypass began Copyright c Stuart Herbert Blog Twitter Facebook Photography Merthyr Road Daily Desktop Wallpaper 25 9 Twitter If you re reading this in the RSS feed my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken Unfortunately I haven t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed so for now you ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map Sorry Be the first to leave a comment 14 Shots of Taff Vale Posted by Stuart Herbert on June 1st 2007 in Church Village Egwlysilan Merthyr Road Modern Nantgarw Shoot Taffs Well Tonteg Walking Routes I took advantage of the recent May bank holiday weekend to head on up to the top of the Garth and shoot some photos of what I could see Whilst I was up there I took these 14 panned shots of Taff Vale There ll be a full article on The View from the Garth in the next few days but I wanted to share these 14 photos separately How many things in these photos do you recognise Please head on over to Flickr and feel free to add as many notes as possible for as many things as possible If you re reading this in the RSS feed my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken Unfortunately I haven t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed so for now you ll have to click through to my blog if you want to

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/photography/category/tonteg/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Stuart's Photography - » Tramroad
    on the thumbnail to see a larger version of the photo that interests you Post Production I toyed with the idea of desaturating the colours from this shoot to match the style I used in the Unofficial Taff Vale Eastern Ridge Walk but to be honest I m so pleased with the colours captured by the Panasonic Lumix DMC FX33 that I decided to limit my adjustments to edge sharpening I m not completely convinced by the FX33 s colours in dull light such as the colours captured in this shot but in brighter light the camera did very well 3 comments The World s First Steam Engine Railway Journey Posted by Stuart Herbert on April 22nd 2007 in A470 Trunk Road Great Western Railway Historical Iron Steel Merthyr Road Merthyr Vale Navigation Modern day Abercynon Pentyrch and Melingriffith Light Railway Pontygwaith Quakers Yard Quakers Yard and Merthyr Joint Railway River Taff Shoot Taff Trail Taff Vale Railway Modern day Valley Lines Tramroad View all the photos from this set as part of my Merthyr Road collection on Flickr On 21st February 1804 Cornishman Richard Trevithick successfully brought 10 tons of iron and 70 men down from the Penydaren Iron Works in Merthyr Tydfil to the Glamorganshire Canal s wharves at Navigation by pulling the wagons along an existing tramroad using a steam powered engine It was the first time anywhere in the world that a steam engine had been used to pull anything along a railed track The Penydaren Mining Railway also known as the Penydaren Tramroad or the Penydaren Tramway or the Merthyr Tramroad was the setting for this historical event Penydaren is also often spelt as Penydarren and the tramroad is often called the Penydarren Tramroad Which spelling is right I leave to others to decide The tramroad had been built because the Dowlais Company s railroad ran past the Penydaren Ironworks on a high level course making it impossible to build a junction for the Penydaren Ironworks to use In response Samuel Homfray commissioned the tramroad to follow the eastern bank of the River Taff down to Navigation modern day Abercynon The tramroad was completed in 1802 and was in use until 1875 except for a period of uncertain length starting in 1815 and maybe continuing to 1825 because of the collapse of a bridge at Edwardsville just north of Quakers Yard Although it was the route used for the first ever steam powered railway journey those early iron rails couldn t take the weight of the engine Just as it had been before Trevithick after he d left South Wales he was notorious for losing interest in his inventions it was his great character flaw the tramroad reverted back to using horses to draw the wagons down to Navigation To accomodate the horses the tramroad didn t use sleepers as we re now used to from our modern railways The rails sat on two lines of stones allowing the horses to walk between the rails without difficulty It also made things easier for the man who led the horse throughout the journey There are several good examples of the tramroad stones still in existence along the route Today the rails are gone but the tramroad used in that historical journey still exists and can be followed from Abercynon up to Merthyr Tydfil The entire length up to Pontygwaith is part of the Taff Trail route of the National Cycle Way Thoughts On The Day With blue skies overhead this route makes for a very relaxing walk through some of the most beautiful parts of the Taff Valley Although neither the A470 nor the Valley Line service up to Merthyr Tydfil are ever far from the tramroad the calming lull of the River Taff bubbling along in the opposite direction more than makes up for the dull background noise of road and rail My original plan was to follow the tramroad all the way up from Navigation to Merthyr Tydfil and then catch the train back to Abercynon but I didn t make it all the way I spent far too long along the way stopping for photos which meant that a journey that takes the train just 9 minutes took me nearly six hours By contrast it took me only two hours to make the return trip including a photo stop at the Giant s Bite The other problem is that the tramroad unfortunately hasn t completely survived The section from Navigation ends at Merthyr Vale It is possible to pick up the trail again from Troedyrhiw but it seemed sensible to leave that for a follow up visit when maybe I wouldn t get lost The route s in various conditions From Navigation to Quakers Yard it has become a single track road serving a few houses that lie along the route From Quakers Yard to Pontygwaith Bridge it s a stony track similar to many now used by the Taff Trail I was struck by the difference from Pontygwaith Bridge to the southern end of Merthyr Vale where the track is packed hardcore showing off the original stones that the rails sat on to perfection And then you get to Merthyr Vale where the tramroad is in various states of having been tarmaced over or completely buried under some form of building work that I don t recognise At some point in the middle of all this the tramroad actually crosses the railway line I completely failed to spot this and ended up walking along the old Merthyr Vale Colliery branch line instead until it came to an end I only realised my mistake during the post production research for this article There are magnificient views to be had especially through the Pontygwaith Nature Reserve This hidden valley used to be crossed by three great viaducts Two of them the Joint Line s viaduct to Cefn Glas and the GWR s viaduct to the Cynon Valley no longer stand they were demolished in

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/photography/category/tramroad/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Stuart's Photography - » Treforest
    only when I went to photograph it that I discovered that it goes over more than just the River Taff I ve never seen or read about any sort of tram road running along the western shore of the River Taff so today I am at a lost to say what went under the bridge here Maybe this is simply a modern addition to enable access to the river bank from the park You can just about make out the arches of the old Machine Bridge at Glyntaff According to GaAC this bridge was built to carry the Doctor s Tramroad across the Taff to the Doctor s Canal where goods from the Rhondda were transferred onto canal barges and shipped downstream and into the Glamorganshire Canal proper GaAC speculates that this might be the oldest surviving railway bridge in the world predating all of the bridges that carried the Penydarren Tramroad down from Merthyr to Navigation This view has also been expressed in a local news article about a threat in 2003 to demolish the bridge Fancy that and yet there s no sort of plaque or anything information like on the bridge itself that I ve ever seen Unfortunately I took no notice at all of the old Machine Bridge at Glyntaff when it was still in use by cars so I have idea what this lattice framework is for or where it originally fitted into the bridge s construction For many years the Machine Bridge was the main road link between the A470 and Treforrest The fabric of the bridge couldn t withstand the traffic and the bridge was for a time threatened with demolition Thankfully common sense seems to have prevailed with a new road bridge having been built immediately south of the Machine Bridge Today the Machine Bridge is a footbridge closed to traffic but popular as a car park with council workmen or their contractors Isn t this a beautiful bridge to look at I m afraid that atm I don t know anything about it but I certainly would love to Favourite Photo From The Shoot It wasn t easy to pick just one photo from this group but this is the one that I like the most I just think it does a great job of showing off a very beautiful bridge Post Production This set of photos marks the start of the next evolution in my photographic style I ve been using HDR for several months now but this time I was determined to put together a workflow that brings the HDR images closer in initial appearance to regular single frame photos Before HDR my favourite style had been the slightly desaturated look of the Taff Vale Eastern Ridge Walk set What I wanted was that look but with the added detail that HDR brings Too many HDR photos just lack a certain subtlety as do too many single exposure shots it has to be said Since taking these photos a year ago now I ve refined the HDR workflow over and over before finally coming back to these photos and re processing them for publication at last I promise that I ll do a full article on the workflow in the near future but the main points are to avoid over saturating the original HDR image and then using Aperture 2 s new Saturation and Definition tools to bring out the best of the HDR detail whilst toning down its exuberance at the same time Sadly I ve been too short of time to thoroughly research each of the bridges in this set There s also one bridge missing Brunel s bridge that carries the Taff Vale Railway north from Pontypridd station over the River Rhondda towards Abercynon I only noticed that whilst doing the write up Doh 22 comments Single Shot Series The Leafy Road To Llantrisant Posted by Stuart Herbert on June 2nd 2008 in A473 Merthyr Road Modern Shoot Treforest Tagged with A473 Empty Green June Leafy Photo Road Single Shot Series With the car in the garage for its M OT the quickest way on foot for me get to and from the garage is down Merthyr Road through Treforest and then up the A473 to Power Station Hill It s a fair walk but it s worth it for those times of the year when the leaves are green and this stretch of the A473 is empty 6 comments Graffiti At The Old Tin Works Posted by Stuart Herbert on February 25th 2007 in Cardiff Railway Historical Merthyr Road Shoot Tin Works Treforest View this selection of photos in my Merthyr Road set on Flickr The old tin works at Treforest were once the largest in the whole of Britain Today they have long since closed and the buildings have fallen into disrepair Much of the site has been levelled but what remains provides the faintest of hints of the South Wales Valleys at the height of their industrial glory Aim Of The Shoot From the A470 I ve often caught a glimpse through the trees to the west of the remains of old factories nestling in the shadow of an old railway embankment Armed with a couple of bottles of Lucozade and a few bars of my favourite chocolate I walked down through Pontypridd and Treforest determined to finally find out just what this place is Thoughts On The Day Walking across the cleared ground and through the ruins that remain it s very difficult to imagine that this was once part of the most important industrial complex in Britain and therefore the world thanks to the British Empire The chains for the Titanic were made just to the north Coal for the Royal Navy came from further north passing by using the canal and later the crazy rail network that once criss crossed the valley Iron came down from Merthyr Just to the south lay the second largest tin works in Britain it

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/photography/category/treforest/ (2016-05-02)
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