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  • Stuart's Photography - » 2007 » April
    this time appear to have only been the water left in the Sea Lock Pond emptied out into the Taff in a tidal wave The Canal s 158 years of operation had finally come to an end Within 50 years the rest of the Cardiff Dock area too would close leaving Cardiff a small town that became a capital city on the back of its links between the industrial valleys and the sea to once again revert back to being a market town As always I m indebted to the historical research published in the excellent Glamorganshire and Aberdare Canals Volume 2 by Stephen Rowson and Ian L Wright If you want to know a lot more about Sea Lock or any other aspect of the Canal I can t recommend their award winning books highly enough The Photos The search for the location of Sea Lock starts to the south in the newly created Cardiff Bay Wetlands Like Hamadryad Park further up the river this area is largely land reclaimed after the construction of the Cardiff Bay Barriage One of my personal disappointments about Cardiff Bay is the complete lack of effort to make the new development blend in with existing housing I don t think anywhere shows this as well as Windsor Esplanade with its row of older housing and the modern Lecuna development tacked on the end like an afterthought This is the view of Sea Lock today standing at the southern end of what is now Canal Park I m looking at the eastern end of the A4232 road bridge across the River Taff Sea Lock would have been where the bridge now touches down Because the whole area has been redeveloped there s nothing left today of Sea Lock itself nor the channel that went out from Sea Lock into the tidal estuary formed by the River Taff and Bristol Channel This is my best guess based on comparing photos published in GaAC Volume 2 especially the very last photo in the book with modern day views from Google Earth This is the underside of the A4232 road bridge across the River Taff looking west towards Grangetown Sea Lock itself would probably have been a little ways behind me with the channel cut from the lock to the River Taff roughly following the line of the modern bridge This murial stands at the southern end of Canal Park at the southern end of what would have been Sea Lock Pond during the days of the Glamorganshire Canal I m afraid I couldn t tell you what the different scenes on the murial mean To me it looks like a telling of the history of the Cardiff Docks and doesn t seem to mention the Canal at all That d be a bit odd if so given where it s located Canal Park stands on some of the land reclaimed after the closure of the Glamorganshire Canal in 1951 This is a view of Canal Park looking north towards James Street Canal Park stands on some of the land reclaimed after the closure of the Glamorganshire Canal in 1951 This is a view of Canal Park looking north towards James Street Most of the buildings that used to flank the canal are gone swept away in a frenzy of regeneration Two of the surviving buildings are the Royal Stuart Warehouses and the Douglas Buildings Canal Park stands on some of the land reclaimed after the closure of the Glamorganshire Canal in 1951 This is a view of Canal Park looking south from James Street Today there s nothing left but back when the Glamorganshire Canal still existed James Street had to cross the Canal over a swing bridge This is the entrance to the length of Canal Park that stands to the south of James Street The words in the murial on the ground are Glamorganshire Canal 1794 1951 1794 is an odd choice of date From surviving records mentioned in GaAC Volume 2 we know that the original Sea Lock opened in 1793 Back then the canal didn t come this far south the original Sea Lock opened up onto the River Taff further upstream at the site of the new Century Wharf housing development The Glamorganshire Canal Act of 1796 authorised the canal company to extend Sea Lock Pond south through the point in this photo to a new Sea Lock The new Sea Lock didn t open until 1798 Can anyone else explain why the date chosen for this murial is 1794 This is the entrance to Canal Park on the north side of James Street The murial says Sea Lock 1798 This is what the Canal Park entrance on the north side of James Street looks like if you stand in the Canal Park entrance on the south side of James Street When the Canal still operated there would have been a swing bridge where the road now stands Taken just inside the entrance this shot shows the first section of Canal Park heading north from James Street towards Cardiff City Centre Canal Park stands on ground reclaimed when the Glamorganshire Canal was filled in during the 1950 s This section of the canal was known as Sea Lock Pond and later as Sea Lock Pound Essentially it was a large dock with Cardiff Town at its northern end and Sea Lock itself at the southern end This play area in Canal Park provides a memory of the Glamorganshire Canal albeit not a very realistic one The four capsterns are placed to represent the old towpath whilst in the gray paving the outline of a narrow boat can just be made out In reality this section of the canal known as Sea Lock Pond was the widest section of the Canal This area was from the beginning built to support the transfer of iron and coal onto the ocean going vessels of the day A view of some of the play areas in Canal Park today Looking south towards James Street Looking north the play areas in Canal Park give way to playing fields There were plenty of soccer posts but I don t remember seeing any rugby posts up If the four capsterns and narrow boat outline are the most obvious reminder of the canal s days preserved in Canal Park this must surely be at the other end of the scale as the most obscure This is a crane post and base used on the wharves of Sea Lock Pond for loading and unloading boats To the best of my knowledge it is the only one that survives today I believe that there would have been many more but the old photos published in GaAC Volume 2 only show one at any one time Here I ve used the telephoto end of my Nikon 18 135mm lens to flatten this shot of Canal Park and Butetown at the end of the park Redevelopment has swept away most of the old buildings that used to stand on the canal wharves at Sea Lock Pond These two look like they might be survivors from an earlier time Canal Park finally comes to an end quite a bit shy of where Sea Lock Pond would have ended The housing at this end is modern modern enough that a lot of it doesn t show up on Google Earth yet In the distance are the buildings of Callahan Square and the Mariott Hotel on Mill Lane The hotel also stands on land reclaimed from the Glamorganshire Canal as it made its way through Cardiff City Centre This is a shot of Canal Park taken from its northern end From here there s nothing at all that I can see to indicate that this was once a thriving sea port We may have run out of Canal Park but the journey north towards the northern end of Sea Lock Pond continues along Canal Parade Taken from the northern end of Canal Parade looking south towards Canal Park We know that Sea Lock Pond s northern end was at Custom House which stands at the other side of the railway bridge in the middle of this shot The Swansea to London railway came to Cardiff in 1850 and ever since Cardiff has been divided in two Cardiff was originally a walled town The southern wall would have stood a little to the north of the railway bridge at the end of St Mary s Street It was removed at the request of the Glamorganshire Canal Company to allow easier access between Cardiff town and the wharves of Sea Lock Pond This bridge is where Sea Lock Pond s northern end would have been Note the distinctive way in which the road dips under the bridge This appears to be a common feature of roads that run under surviving railway bridges along the old canal route although it s by no means unique to railway bridges over the canal Behind the bridge on the right is the York Hotel and Customs House marking the end of the journey up from Sea Lock Thoughts on the Day It will come as no surprise to hear that Sea Lock itself and the whole Sea Lock Pond are no more Sea Lock the Pond and Butetown have suffered that most terrible of fates they have been redeveloped Despite numerous efforts including such extreme lengths as siting the Welsh Assembly down in the Cardiff Docks when it should have been sited somewhere like Aberwyswyth the whole area south of Cardiff s old town wall continues to feel disconnected from the rest of the city I ll look at the regeneration of Cardiff Docks in a later article in this series Sea Lock itself probably lies underneath the bridge that carries the A4232 across the river estuary That matches up with the last photo published in GaAC Volume 2 on page 352 To the south of the bridge lies the Cardiff Yacht Club and the new wetlands created as part of the official vandalism that created the Cardiff Bay Barriage whilst the river bank immediately north of the bridge has been redeveloped into Hamadryad Park It s actually possible to get from the wetlands to the park by walking under the bridge and I highly recommend it the park is a very peaceful place indeed Trying to trace the route of the Sea Lock Pond by the surviving buildings is very difficult indeed Unlike in Taff Vale where many of the original buildings that were built along the side of the Canal still exist down here redevelopment and regeneration has swept most of the history away The majority of the length of Sea Lock Pond has been turned into an open space called Canal Park You won t find this space listed on Cardiff City Council s website but it s there From Sea Lock at the southern end up to the back of St Mary s Church in Butetown in the north Canal Park runs along the route of the old Canal and its wharves and if you look closely enough there are memories of the former canal hidden away in plain sight Sadly I couldn t find a single sign to commemorate the canal What signs there are are notice boards for the local community The kids growing up in the area today and playing in the park itself have nothing to read to remind them of the past All that s left to stimulate an interest in the history of the Canal is the name of the park itself the names Sea Lock and Glamorganshire Canal laid out in brick at the point where James Street crosses the Park the sight of a former swing bridge across the Canal although to look at it today I think anyone would be amazed to learn that there was once a bridge at that spot and not much else Heading north through the park towards Cardiff city centre I found a few things to remember the canal by ranging from the obvious to the obscure At the obvious end of things is this play area flanked by mooring capsterns If you look closely at the paving the outline of a narrow boat has been incorporated into the design About half way between obvious and obscure are some of the old buildings that border onto the park There aren t many left but there are just enough to show where the wharves might have originally been My favourite item though is this obscure post set into a concrete base This is the base and crown post from one of the canalside cranes see GaAC p 293 although how anyone growing up in the area is supposed to know that isn t immediately obvious I m not sure what the merit is of preserving a piece of history whilst at the same time not leaving a message to tell the next generation what has been preserved It s a maddingly frustrating story that s repeated all along the route of the canal and one that the folks I meet on each of these trips wish would come to an end Cardiff should be proud of what the Canal and the railways that came afterwards did for the place Three Lessons From The Shoot It often pays to go back to the same place two or three times before doing a shoot I m not someone who can just look at a location in a book and then head straight there to get everything in one go I d been down to Sea Lock a couple of times before and matched up what I d seen for myself with what I d read in GaAC Volume 2 before heading down for the final shoot I m glad I did I wouldn t have thought to include the shots of the A4232 bridge which stands on the old Sea Lock location otherwise Google Earth is a real gift for projects like this It was instrumental in matching up photos published in GaAC with the street layout today to help me find Sea Lock itself During a shoot take as many photos as you can Don t ignore something just because you don t know what it is at the time I didn t find out what the canal crane post was until leafing through GaAC Volume 2 several days after the shoot It would have been very easy for me to have not photographed it Post Production It was a cheery sunny morning and I wanted these photos to reflect that Butetown is one of those parts of Cardiff that has a certain reputation and I was very worried that another black and white set would do nothing to show a different side to the place Canal Park is the major open space in Butetown and for that I think it s fantastic Looking at the photos a week or so after processing them I m not happy with the colour It s too eye popping and doesn t sit well with all the black and white shots from other sets in the Merthyr Road series Time for a re think before I publish my next article Found On Flickr Whilst there are plenty of photos on Flickr about Cardiff Bay I had no luck in finding many modern pictures of Canal Park But I did manage to find a photo of the Sea Lock area taken from a kite plus two older photos that also appear in GaAC Volume 2 Kite photograph of Cardiff Bay by nick russill Glamorganshire Canal by Ben Salter Cardiff Docks by Ben Salter If you re reading this in the RSS feed my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken Unfortunately I haven t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed so for now you ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map Sorry About The Author Stuart has been writing PHP applications since 2003 and has been contributing to open source software since 1994 He was an early writer for php architect a co author of the Official Zend Certification Study Guide for PHP 4 and a regular speaker at conferences and user groups since 2004 When he s not designing software Stuart loves to explore the world through a camera lens spend time with his beloved guitars and continue his study to T ai Chi Chu an Taijiquan 7 comments Following The Sculpture Trail Posted by Stuart Herbert on April 6th 2007 in Shoot See all the photos from my visit to the Forest of Dean Sculpture Trail on Flickr Usually public holidays here in the UK are guaranteed to be wet and have generally miserable weather the sort where you don t want to leave the house never mind take your camera with you Hopefully the weather gods are still looking at last year s calendar because today was a beautiful day for some outdoor photography We went across the border into England for a leisurely walk round the Royal Forest of Dean s Sculpture Trail Started in 1986 the Sculpture Trust has commissioned many artists over the years to create sculptures both permanent and temporary to live throughout the forest There are currently 18 permanent sculptures that make up the trail Place by Magdelena Jetelova 1986 Bois Mort by Carole Drake 1995 The Heart of Stone by Tim Lees 1988 Black Dome by David Nash 1986 Fire and Water Boats by David Nash 1986 Iron Road by Keir Smith 1986 Searcher by Sophy Ryder 1988 In Situ by Erika Tan 2004 Grove of Silence by Ian Hamilton Finlay 1986 Cone Vessel by Peter Randall Page 1988 Life Cycle by Ingemar Thalin 2002 House by Miles Davies 1988 Smoke Ring by Stuart Frost 1986 Observatory by Bruce Allan

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/photography/2007/04/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Stuart's Photography - » 2007 » March
    explore in this area There s the Canal itself which can be followed up to Longwood Drive and further north up to Tongwynlais as covered in another article From Longwood Drive there s the disused Cardiff Railway route down to Coryton which also makes for a great walk And all of these walks are set in the Local Nature Reserve which includes two purpose built hides for watching the local wildlife without disturbing it Favourite Photo From The Shoot From the two visits I made to Melingriffith I came away with 305 photos according to Aperture Even allowing for the fact I now bracket every shot so divide that number by 3 that s still a lot of photos It was a tough challenge cutting it down to the 26 photos I finally uploaded to Flickr Picking just one photo as a favourite was harder still In the end this photo showing the Glamorganshire Canal flowing down into the Melingriffith Feeder is my favourite photo from this shoot It s a photo that s a bit different for a start I m willing to wager there aren t too many other shots of this scene currently around I love the colours too I think it s a great advert for what my new Nikon 18 135mm lens can do more on that lens in a dedicated article later in the year Post Production The photos for this shoot come from two separate visits to the area Because you have the Canal the Cardiff Railway the River Taff and the Taff Trail all in the same area some of the shots are going to be included in other shoots in the future Rather than lump all these shots into a single folder I decided to spend a lot of Mother s Day tagging my photos in Aperture with a view to building a set of Smart Albums based on the tags Aperture is a great tool but if there s one thing that Apple has overlooked it s the very simple operation of being able to add one keyword to a group of selected photos I can use the excellent Lift Stamp tool to copy keywords from one photo to others but I can t drag and drop a keyword onto a group of selected photos When you try the keyword gets applied to just one photo in the selection the photo that you drop the keyword onto It would be such a time saver to be able to do this simple task it would save me up to an hour a week Found On Flickr A search for the term melingriffith turned up two great shots of the Water Pump but no shots of the Feeder at all and no old photographs showing the Tin Works during their existence Melingriffith Tinplate Works by locus imagination castlecoch3 by Mr Karanka Maybe my search foo just isn t good enough I m really surprised that there aren t more photos up on Flickr covering the same subjects as my articles These places are part of the Welsh heritage as well as being historically important both to Wales and the UK About The Author Stuart has been writing PHP applications since 2003 and has been contributing to open source software since 1994 He was an early writer for php architect a co author of the Official Zend Certification Study Guide for PHP 4 and a regular speaker at conferences and user groups since 2004 When he s not designing software Stuart loves to explore the world through a camera lens spend time with his beloved guitars and continue his study to T ai Chi Chu an Taijiquan 7 comments Loading The Chains At Brown Lenox Posted by Stuart Herbert on March 22nd 2007 in A470 Trunk Road Glamorganshire Canal Historical Manufacturing Merthyr Road Pontypridd Shoot My quest to explore the route once taken by the old Glamorganshire Canal recently led me to a surviving stretch of canal hidden in the shadow of the A4054 as it passes from Glyntaff to Coedpenmaen in Pontypridd Here canal boats used to load chains made at the Brown Lenox Co Ltd factory in Newbridge It was Samuel Brown the Brown in Brown Lenox Co Ltd who patented iron chains for securing ships to their anchors replacing ropes and with his cousin Samuel Lenox he established a highly successful company to manufacture these chains Brown and Lenox built their first factory in Millwall on the River Thames but increased demand led to them constructing a second factory the Newbridge Chain Works on the west bank of the Glamorganshire Canal in 1816 Found on the Rhondda Cynon Taff district council s website this photo provides a great view of how the canal basin at Brown Lenox looked in years gone by The bridge that still survives today can be seen just below the canal lock The second bridge into the Brown Lenox loading dock no longer survives Thoughts On The Day I ve used the bridge at the northern end of the Brown Lenox basin many times as a cut through from Ynysangharad Road to the Brown Lenox Retail Park but I never remembered seeing the canal basin itself there before How could I have missed it In truth there s hardly anything left of the canal at this stretch especially when you look at old photos like the one above The canal has been completely filled in to the north of the bridge and after less than fifty yards to the south the basin begins to narrow where the path has been moved to make way for the factory s car park Although today s footpath is cement or tarmac its entire length the path is surprisingly muddy in several places As you head south the basin quickly disappears The footpath ends up roughly where the east bank of the canal once stood as the path squeezes past the shadow of the abandoned Brown Lenox factory I walked the path south to its end and then back north by the time I came past Brown Lenox for the second time the path was obstructed with wooden palettes apparently being lifted from the Brown Lenox site Past Brown Lenox the footpath crosses an ugly little bridge and joins up with the old towpath once more This stretch of the canal is quite a bit longer than the Brown Lenox basin running past some cottages on the west bank before disappearing once more under modern concrete and cement To the best of my knowledge the canal doesn t re appear again until the pottery at Nantgarw and can t be walked along once more until Tongwynlais see my earlier posting on that surviving section All the surviving sections of the canal that I ve found so far all survive for three reasons Firstly and most importantly they haven t disappeared under the A470 trunk road secondly they haven t disappeared under post war housing estates or shopping which is what happened to the canal from Melingriffith southwards and thirdly they re south of Pontypridd This section hasn t disappeared under the A470 because the A470 goes around the other side of the Brown Lenox factory I took some photos on this shoot which show just how close the A470 is and that the line of the canal south disappears under the A470 at Glyntaff When Lord Bute finally bought the canal he originally wanted to close it and use the route for a railway line He ended up being forced to make a go of the canal against his wishes Today much of the route of the canal has been taken by the A470 just has road has replaced rail as the main form of transport in the UK I wonder what will replace the A470 in a hundred year s time Pontypridd sits in a bowl surrounded by hills and mountains on all sides The A470 squeezes through a narrow gap between the River Taff and the Brown Lenox site as it heads down to Treforrest Between the three of them they left no room for anyone to build over the canal with housing or shopping However standing on the surviving canal bridge you can immediately see that this wasn t the case to the north where the canal the locks and Canal Bridge have all disappeared under the Brown Lenox Retail Park and the A470 to its immediate north The future of the Brown Lenox site isn t clear At least one out of town supermarket chain wanted to buy the site to use for a new store but that appears to have fallen through Whatever happens to the site there ll always be the threat that some modern development will seek to erase this section of the canal If that happens that ll leave the section at Tongwynlais as the most northern surviving section of the Canal The canal north of Pontypridd fell into disuse in 1915 and north of Abercynon it fell into disuse in 1898 I understand When you walk the Taff Trail up to Merthyr Tydfil what strikes me is that although the canal has been filled in it isn t as if the land has been reclaimed for any other use until you get into Merthyr itself It makes me wonder whether the canal was filled in by human effort or whether it just silted up and was eventually reclaimed by Mother Nature I suspect the truth is a little of both Favourite Photo From The Shoot I m spoilt for choice from this shoot I really like this quirky shot of the footpath behind the abandoned Brown Lenox factory It s an unusual shot and one that seems to have a bit of energy to it I also love this shot of the row of cottages at the southern end of this surviving stretch of canal and this shot of the canal basin hidden behind Brown Lenox and this shot looking north towards Brown Lenox from beside the surviving towpath But my favourite is this shot of the bridge and Ynysangharad Road beyond taken from just inside the Brown Lenox site Whilst taking the shot I got chatting to a lovely old couple who could remember times when the canal was still in use I really hope they re successful in their work to have the War Memorial up on Coedpenmaen Common floodlit on an evening That ll make for a spectacular sight indeed Three Lessons From The Shoot The Sigma 15 30mm lens is proving a joy to work with provided it isn t pointed anywhere near the sun There s a good reason nearly all these photos are pointing north This lens flares very badly indeed when it catches even a glimpse of the old current bun Take your time and say Hi to the folks you meet It really made my day chatting with the old couple who could remember back when the canal was still in use and could recall when Canal Bridge just to the north still existed before being lost under the A470 Coverage again When I got to the southern end of the path I stopped Grrr I wish I d gone further and taken some shots of the path beside the motorbike shop Although I don t live far from here I ll have to wait until the weekend for enough daylight to get the extra shots in the bag Post Production Shock horror colour photos from me for a change All of these photos look gorgeous in black and white I always convert photos to monochrome in Aperture to adjust contrast and levels but I really like the colours captured in the photos such as this one of the cottages between the canal and the A470 I ve started shooting using the AdobeRGB colour space and mode colour mode II on the D200 It s a much more neutral combination than sRGB colour mode III my choice throughout my time with the D100 and carried over to the D200 for the first year and it s often recommended online as being the best choice for post processing With a little bit of green and blue boosting for landscapes or red boosting for industrial ruins I can see how the result is easier on the eye Found On Flickr Unfortunately I couldn t find any photos on Flickr of this section of the canal including my own I m really starting to doubt the trustworthiness of the map view on Flickr About The Author Stuart has been writing PHP applications since 2003 and has been contributing to open source software since 1994 He was an early writer for php architect a co author of the Official Zend Certification Study Guide for PHP 4 and a regular speaker at conferences and user groups since 2004 When he s not designing software Stuart loves to explore the world through a camera lens spend time with his beloved guitars and continue his study to T ai Chi Chu an Taijiquan 9 comments Updated The House That Glenn Built Posted by Stuart Herbert on March 18th 2007 in Abercanaid Glamorganshire Canal Historical Merthyr Road Modern Shoot Taff Trail I went back up to Abercanaid this morning and shot some additional shots of the Graig Chapel Burial Ground In my original diary entry one of the lessons I learned was that I hadn t shot enough coverage I had no shots of the Burial Ground as a whole nor really of how the Burial Ground fits in to the surrounding area You can see the four additional shots as part of my photo set on Flickr About The Author Stuart has been writing PHP applications since 2003 and has been contributing to open source software since 1994 He was an early writer for php architect a co author of the Official Zend Certification Study Guide for PHP 4 and a regular speaker at conferences and user groups since 2004 When he s not designing software Stuart loves to explore the world through a camera lens spend time with his beloved guitars and continue his study to T ai Chi Chu an Taijiquan Be the first to leave a comment Weaning Off Of Automatic Mode Posted by Stuart Herbert on March 18th 2007 in Technique They say that buses come in threes and this month I ve had three friends asking me how to take the first steps away from their cameras automatic mode commonly called Program Mode on Nikon cameras and start taking photos like real photographers It seems like the perfect topic to start a new series of posts about photographic technique so here goes First off just a disclaimer before I go any further I don t want anyone thinking I m something that I m not I m very definitely an amateur photographer I ve had no formal training and I m certainly not qualified to teach photography If you want to know how things should be done so to speak then enroll on a course I m sure that there ll be plenty of suitable night courses in your area and of course there is always Amateur Photographer s home study course Or you could pick up a good book by a real expert I always recommend Michael Langford s Basic Photography What I m talking about here in these Technique posts are how I work with the camera and what works for me If you re okay with that then read on What Is Automatic Mode A camera s automatic mode is exactly what it sounds like you point the camera at what you want to photograph and the camera makes all the other decisions for you Most compact digital cameras only have an automatic mode Larger digital SLRs all come with automatic modes as well as the ability for you to take more control should you wish SLRs have built in databases of many thousands of photographic scenes and it s often said that SLRs can make better decisions than many photographers Using automatic mode is point and shoot photography And there s nothing wrong with it Don t think for a minute that you re not a real photographer just because you currently use automatic mode I don t even know what a real photographer is or why anyone would want to be one If you re taking photos on automatic mode and you re happy with the results then be happy What Does Automatic Mode Do There are two key decisions that automatic mode makes for you It controls the size of the iris photographers call this the aperture in the camera lens The iris controls the amount of light that the camera sees and has the side effect of controlling the angle that the light hits your camera s sensor It also controls how long in time that the camera sees the light from the lens There is a blackout screen inside the camera called the shutter When the shutter is open your camera sees light The longer the shutter is open the longer your camera sees the light A well exposed shot is a combination of balancing the aperture size against the shutter speed As the aperture size gets smaller the camera needs to see more light the shutter needs to be open longer in order to get enough light to create a photograph Equally the longer the shutter is open the smaller the aperture needs to be to prevent too much light ruining the photograph It s a balancing act between the two A lot of the art in photography comes from taking control of one or both of these key decisions from the camera and putting that control into your own hands Other Modes On Your Camera Traditionally SLR cameras have come with a total of four different camera modes Automatic mode where the camera controls both

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/photography/2007/03/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Stuart's Photography - » 2007 » February
    section has never lived up to its Three Techniques name so from now on Three Lessons it is Instead I ll be posting regular mid week articles on individual photography techniques which will include technical skills starting with weening off automatic mode ideas about composition and the workflow I follow for getting my photos from the camera through Aperture and up onto Flickr A separate article will allow me to really get into a single aspect of photography which will help me learn a lot more about photography But that s to come For today the three lessons from this shoot are When I set out on this walk I didn t know exactly where the remains of the canal were to be found To lighten the load I left the majority of my kit behind and set out with the D200 and just a single lens Although there were plenty of moments where I found myself missing one of my other lenses I definitely enjoyed myself much more because I wasn t carting a tonne of glass around on my back For days like these you can t beat having a jack of all trades lens My wife loves her Tamron 28 300 for just this reason Unfortunately I don t like the results from that lens when paired with the D200 I wonder if supplies of Nikon s 18 200 VR lens have improved recently If you re going out and you re likely to be photographing water don t leave your polariser behind Cough I did and I m still kicking myself for doing so On the bright side it means that I ll have to go back later in the year preferably when all the mud has dried out If the sign says go one way try going the other As I mentioned in the introduction to this article I ve been down part of this path before but I had absolutely no idea how close I was to the old canal Post Production I need to rethink the way I m organising my photos in Aperture I ve decided that I hate keywording all of my photos Even with creating a metadata preset before doing the import it still takes hours to go through each individual photo and apply the right keywords for that individual frame I don t have that sort of time so I ve stopped keywording photos in Aperture but I still manually tag photos on Flickr Instead my photos go into a Merthyr Road project in Aperture This project is divided up into several folders based on geography Taffs Well to Treforest for example and each folder contains an album for each major subject such as the Glamorganshire Canal or the Cardiff Railway The only problem is of course that I ve ended up with several Glamorganshire Canal albums and several Cardiff Railway albums As the number of shoots racks up I d like to be able to look at all my Glamorganshire Canal photos in one place so that I can see how my coverage is doing and what gaps I need to think about plugging in future I can t do that with the way I m organising my photos in Aperture today Aperture supports Smart Albums albums that can automatically pull in photos based on their keywords I think I need to restructure my Merthyr Road project to make the most of this feature Found On Flickr There aren t many photos of the Glamorganshire Canal on Flickr at all and the few that I ve found really belong with my upcoming shoot of the Local Nature Reserve section of the canal But I did manage to find a couple of shots that seemed appropriate to today s shoot especially welshlady s shot of Castle Coch taken from the Iron Bridge which looks nicer than my attempt at the same shot today Juvenile Heron by gtj 45 Closer look at Castle Coch by welshlady About The Author Stuart has been writing PHP applications since 2003 and has been contributing to open source software since 1994 He was an early writer for php architect a co author of the Official Zend Certification Study Guide for PHP 4 and a regular speaker at conferences and user groups since 2004 When he s not designing software Stuart loves to explore the world through a camera lens spend time with his beloved guitars and continue his study to T ai Chi Chu an Taijiquan 7 comments Graffiti At The Old Tin Works Posted by Stuart Herbert on February 25th 2007 in Cardiff Railway Historical Merthyr Road Shoot Tin Works Treforest View this selection of photos in my Merthyr Road set on Flickr The old tin works at Treforest were once the largest in the whole of Britain Today they have long since closed and the buildings have fallen into disrepair Much of the site has been levelled but what remains provides the faintest of hints of the South Wales Valleys at the height of their industrial glory Aim Of The Shoot From the A470 I ve often caught a glimpse through the trees to the west of the remains of old factories nestling in the shadow of an old railway embankment Armed with a couple of bottles of Lucozade and a few bars of my favourite chocolate I walked down through Pontypridd and Treforest determined to finally find out just what this place is Thoughts On The Day Walking across the cleared ground and through the ruins that remain it s very difficult to imagine that this was once part of the most important industrial complex in Britain and therefore the world thanks to the British Empire The chains for the Titanic were made just to the north Coal for the Royal Navy came from further north passing by using the canal and later the crazy rail network that once criss crossed the valley Iron came down from Merthyr Just to the south lay the second largest tin works in Britain it s claim as the biggest stolen by the works here in Treforest Now it s just a handful of ruined sheds surrounded by a security fence that the locals pay no attention to all buttressed up against the remains of a railway embankment that it appears used to end in a viaduct across the valley There are no signs to mark its passing save one a modern sign proclaiming that the local allotments are called the Tin Works Allotments Indeed it s left to the two bricked up tunnels to the east of the ruins and an open tunnel that lies immediately to the west that begs a return visit to provide the only hint that this was once such an important site It isn t just the old tunnels that are striking The local kids have covered some of the walls both inside the works and on some of the buildings outside the grounds with some great graffiti I know that graffiti is generally considered an nuisance and a menace by today s society and I m sure that there are plenty of folks who wish for less politically correct days when they could just pack these troublesome miscreants off to one of the colonies but at the same time I think the ones I found in the old tin works are really good Given a choice I d rather kids were drawing things than mugging old ladies I m going to save the photos of the site itself for another posting on another day I took over a hundred and fifty pictures of the site and I need time to sort through them and process the ones worth publishing Favourite Photo From The Shoot It feels like I m cheating By breaking up this shoot into several postings I get to have more than just one favourite photo even though it was all the same shoot There were several pieces of great graffiti that I captured during the shoot but my favourite photo has to be this one I think it does the best job of getting that balance right between subject and context What s your favourite photo from the shoot Let me know in the comments below Three Tips From The Shoot You can t beat local knowledge Families walking their dogs tend to know all the best routes and where it s safe to walk both from a danger point of view and from a avoiding trouble from landowners point of view Speaking of danger you can t walk around these places with your eye glued to the viewfinder Apart from the very real risk of tripping over something and cutting yourself on sharp things on the ground you re in danger of falling down uncovered shafts at any time Most photo composition comes down to showing a subject in a context In this selection of shots the subject was meant to be the graffiti and the context was meant to be the ruins that the graffiti has been painted onto I didn t maintain the discipline required and quite a few of my shots example ended up the wrong way around Post Production Part way through processing the images from this shoot my workflow with Aperture began to take shape Rather than post the full details here I ll put together some example images of the workflow in action and publish them as a separate blog entry in the near future I d like to start posting technique focused entries mid week to balance the weekend shoots this ll make a good first or second article Found On Flickr I haven t managed to find any other photos on Flickr of the Treforest Tin Works at all That s a real shame especially when you realise that the University of Glamorgan can be found literally just down the road About The Author Stuart has been writing PHP applications since 2003 and has been contributing to open source software since 1994 He was an early writer for php architect a co author of the Official Zend Certification Study Guide for PHP 4 and a regular speaker at conferences and user groups since 2004 When he s not designing software Stuart loves to explore the world through a camera lens spend time with his beloved guitars and continue his study to T ai Chi Chu an Taijiquan 5 comments Lunch Time Shoot Tearing Down Cardiff Posted by Stuart Herbert on February 19th 2007 in Cardiff Merthyr Road Modern Shoot Shopping View these photos as part of my Cardiff set on Flickr It was a crazy week at work I clocked up 56 hours last week and I was by no means the only one but there was still time to pop over a couple of streets to where the demolition of Bridge Street is well under way The whole area is being cleared to make way for the St Davids 2 shopping centre complex which is due to open in 2009 Aim Of The Shoot Although I m currently looking around for a good urban landscape shot the real aim of the shoot was to switch off from work for a few minutes and give myself a little recharge over lunch Thoughts On The Day The demolition team have erected screens around the doomed buildings Whilst they protect the public from stray bits of rubble and some but not all of the dust created by the work the screens also prevent photographers from seeing much of what is going on Fortunately this is what car park roofs are for The only downside was that the car park stairwells were full of beggars and junkies obliviously shooting up The lifts were still in working order but I think that the safest way to do this would probably be to drive up onto the roof Favourite Photo From The Shoot My favourite photo from the shoot is a close up shot of the muncher about the tear up a little bit more building I think it s an appropriate metaphor for the way that our worship of the great God of Commercialism continues to eat away at everything that has gone before It is relentless in its pursuit of hoovering up more money The thing that gets me though is that I m not sure who is going to be doing the spending once all the new stops have opened The shops aren t replacements they are additional units There s only so much money to go around and folks can t live off credit forever Three Tips From The Shoot If you re trying to photograph a static subject keep an open mind on where you can move to to find the right view At street level everything was obscured by the safety screens but by finding a high vantage point it was possible to get a much better view To find the right pictures pick a print medium book or newspaper and imagine what sort of photos would go in that medium This time I was trying to imagine what sort of photos would accompany an inside spread for a newspaper article As I rarely read newspapers I don t have much of an idea about this and I think that comes through in the photos that I took The extra reach of a larger telephoto zoom is rarely needed but there are times when nothing else will do My Sigma 80 400mm lens takes up a lot of room in my camera bag it s heavy the optical stabilisation drains the batteries on my D200 like nobody s business and most of the time there isn t enough light to capture sharp images But it stays for moments like this when there s only one chance of getting the shot and I can t get close enough to use a faster or lighter lens Post Production Although I d taken my camera in hoping that the damp conditions would improve they didn t I ended up converting the photos to black and white in the hope of adding a little more depth to the images Unfortunately this is one set of shots that it will be impossible to reproduce when the light does start to improve as we go into March and April By then Bridge Street should be cleared but they still have to demolish the Central Library building Flickr Favourites I didn t manage to find any other photos showing the demolition work going on that I liked but here are a few other photos of Cardiff that did make it into my Flickr Favourites Morgan s arcade Cardiff by attentialcane Headless by The Original Mozzy About The Author Stuart has been writing PHP applications since 2003 and has been contributing to open source software since 1994 He was an early writer for php architect a co author of the Official Zend Certification Study Guide for PHP 4 and a regular speaker at conferences and user groups since 2004 When he s not designing software Stuart loves to explore the world through a camera lens spend time with his beloved guitars and continue his study to T ai Chi Chu an Taijiquan Be the first to leave a comment Avebury All To Myself Posted by Stuart Herbert on February 11th 2007 in Shoot See the photos from today s shoot as part of my Avebury set on Flickr When Kristi decided to visit old University friends living in nearby Wooten Bassett there was no way I was going to pass up the chance to spend the afternoon wandering around Avebury once more This was only the second time I ve visited Avebury alone the last time was back in 1999 And I m really glad I went because to all intents and purposes I had the place all to myself I ve been to Avebury many many times over the last ten years in all sorts of weather and I ve never seen the place so deserted I think that only two of the twenty five shots I ve uploaded to Flickr this evening have people in I ve been there late at night well after sunset for a spot of night photography and still seen more people I just hope that the new car parking arrangements which I m definitely not a fan of aren t keeping people away Aim Of The Shoot No matter how many times I visit Avebury or maybe because it s a site I ve revisited so often I always come away wishing I d done better This time I was determined to make the most of the freedom of being alone to finally bag more than just the odd decent shot Thoughts On The Day Driving over from snow bound Wales we both thought that the blue skies and soft light were together going to make this a great trip The weather gods obviously heard us tempting fate By the time I got there it had clouded over and once the rain started it was in for the day I have a tried and trusted trick for dealing with the British weather Shoot everything in colour and then convert all the shots to black and white in Aperture when I get home You don t get the very best shots the light under an overcast sky is just too defuse ruining the contrast somewhat but by God the shots look a lot better than the colour originals I m still persevering with manual focus and I m still forgetting to use the right eye to get the focus right through the viewfinder After ten years of shooting on autofocus my technique s still a bit unreliable as you can see for yourself on this shot of a lone surviving snowman Favourite Photo From The Shoot I wish I could pick them all For the first time

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  • Stuart's Photography - » 2007 » January
    from this shoot The reflection of the supporting column in the water the blown highlights from the incoming sun and the way that the photo very quickly drops off into darkness they all sum up for me how I remember my walk beneath the precinct I m also very fond of the black and white version of the same photo Three Tips From The Shoot If you re out and about alone make sure someone knows where you ve gone I didn t see anyone at all underneath the precinct but that doesn t mean that it s always safe to wander around down there You re much more likely to have an accident than be assaulted anyway no matter where you go to take photos The last thing you want is to be in need of assistance when no one knows where to look for you Do your best to avoid blown highlights The huge contrast between the low winter sun streaming in and the darkness of the car park was a metering nightmare My trusty Canon Digital IXUS did a great job in the end but practically every photo still ended up with badly blown highlights You can often recover parts of a picture from dark areas but there s nothing in blown highlights to rescue Make sure your battery is charged or carry a spare There s a good reason why I never made it back up those stairs to take photos of the rest of the precinct Post Production Unlike last week s shoot up at the Cefn Coed Viaduct this time around I ve uploaded both colour and black and white versions of all but one of the photos I m not quite sure how I feel about that to be honest Normally I convert photos to black and white as a way of salvaging uninspiring colour originals But this time I felt that the colour photos were good enough to see the light of day too About The Author Stuart has been writing PHP applications since 2003 and has been contributing to open source software since 1994 He was an early writer for php architect a co author of the Official Zend Certification Study Guide for PHP 4 and a regular speaker at conferences and user groups since 2004 When he s not designing software Stuart loves to explore the world through a camera lens spend time with his beloved guitars and continue his study to T ai Chi Chu an Taijiquan 7 comments Cefn Coed Viaduct Posted by Stuart Herbert on January 15th 2007 in Brecon and Merthyr Railway Historical Merthyr Road Merthyr Tydfil Shoot Taff Trail If you drive up from Cardiff along the A470 towards Brecon one of the many great sights that you ll see is the Cefn Coed Viaduct just to the south of the Heads of the Valleys road Originally built as part of the Brecon and Merthyr Railway the viaduct was converted into a public footpath during the late 1990 s with the help of the Heritage Lottery Fund The viaduct itself is accessible from the two lay bys just south of the A465 A470 roundabout It s possible to walk over it or to descend via a rough gravel track down to Tai Mawr Road itself a muddy track to walk under it The viaduct crosses the Taff Fawr one of the two tributaries of the River Taff there s a great view of this from the old bridge at Pont y capel Thoughts On The Day Boy was it wet one of those very Welsh days when it s not so much raining as just sodden in the air Although the D200 has excellent weather seals I didn t fancy the chore of keeping the lenses dry so I opted instead to go with the convenience of my trusty IXUS 400 I m looking forward to going back to the viaduct during the summer With leaves on the trees and blue skies overhead not only will it make for a great day s photography but it will also make for a great afternoon s walk Favourite Photo From The Shoot This black and white shot of the arches of the viaduct from down on Tai Mawr Road is my favourite photo from the shoot It s the detail of the brickwork that does it for me I m really pleased with the results of converting this image in Aperture The original colour photo is also up on Flickr Three Tips From The Shoot Always shoot in colour even if the final images are to be in black and white It gives you more options because you have all those colours available to adjust those options are gone if you shoot straight to black and white One example is this image taken from on top of the viaduct I adjusted the blues in the photo first to ensure that the wet stone that s in focus matched the tone of the rest of the wall as it disappears into the distance Pixel count does matter to a point My photo of a man walking his dog is a crop taken from the top corner of the original image It s such a small crop there s hardly any more detail to be had from the shot This image would have benefited from a few extra megapixels Explore a little When I arrived at the viaduct I didn t know about the old bridge slightly upstream But I m glad I spotted it and made my way down to it In the end I got more good photos from the walk down to that bridge and back than I did from my original planned journey across the viaduct About The Author Stuart has been writing PHP applications since 2003 and has been contributing to open source software since 1994 He was an early writer for php architect a co author of the Official Zend Certification Study Guide

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  • Stuart's Photography - » Abercynon Colliery 1889-1988
    never worked at the pit myself but went there regularly with my grandfather had many a mug of tes in the canteen and carried a good few bundles of Blocks sticks for the fire from the wood shed Hope spmeome readin this will remember these things and please get in youch would love to hear from any old carnetown school mates if there s any still around John Ward says June 20th 2011 at 4 27 pm Fantastic website I am from Abercycon but now live in New York City U S A In particular I find Ray Butler s comments fascinating Ray worked in the Co op in Margaret Street round the corner from my house at 22 Mountain Ash Road I remember you Ray because I was always in an out of the CWOP the co op I was born in 1948 and at 15 didn t go to the mines even though my father Jack Ward was the timekeeper at Abercynon Colliery I was an apprentice at Sages in Ynysboeth Industrial Estate next to AB s Thank you Ray you opened up so many memories for me I wish you and I could enjoy a pint and talk about old times By the way I used to go to Carnetown to see my Grandparents at 18 Taff View its a small world John Ward says June 22nd 2011 at 6 31 pm June 22nd 2011 To Ash M YES Calfaria Sunday School is in Abercynon located at Glancynon Terrace You can look it up on a GPS or use Maps Google Best of luck John Ward Former Abercynon resident John Ward says June 30th 2011 at 5 16 pm To Jon Hughes I think I know you your Dad was my chargehand at Sages in the boeth I was born in 1948 went to Carnetown Infants then to the Catholic School in the Miskin Mountain Ash I was too thick to go to Mount Grammar but made up for it in later years in Tech and MIT in the States My Grandad worked in Abercynon Colliery all his life so I appreciate what you have say about the blocks I recall when they were put on the fire there was a warm smoky smell that I never forgot I have lived in New York City for the past 22 years and work as a free lance consultant engineer I have never forgotten my upbring in Carnetown and Mountain Ash Road I left Wales in the 70 s to work as a Mechanical Engineer in Portsmouth Hampshire then emigrated to the U S A for a new life Best Regards Jon Have a great Life Jon Hughes says July 12th 2011 at 7 55 pm Hi John you have a great memory and I am pretty sure I remember you too You re right about my Dad Lewis Hughes was a chargehand at Sages until it closed down in the 80 s If I remember correctly we went to the same Catholic church at the Navigation in Glancynon Father Nulty was the priest at the time Did you go to Carnetown Junior as well before the Catholic school in Miskin You may remember my brother Peter he went to the central school in Abertaf Not bright enough for mount grammar either he s a consultant psychologist now still in Wales Cardiff I am living in Killarney County Kerry Ireland for the past twenty years my wife From the Mount and I have a couple of businesses in town I lecture at University College Cork as a guest lecturer and also work as a business development consultant across the EU Also did some visiting work in NYC some years ago was there lasy year Christmas shopping for a few days too Maybe we should exchange e mail addresses and keep in contact Don t know how many of us are left now Best wishes from Ireland Jon John Ward says July 13th 2011 at 3 48 pm To Jon Hughes Hello Jon Thank you for your response Your Dad taught me a lot about the finer arts of metalwork Father Nulty I forgot about him I was an altar boy when he ruled the roost To answer your question I left Carnetown Infants sometime in 1955 and was sent straight off to the Catholic school in Miskin in the Mount It was full of tough nut Italian Irish Polish German and even some Welsh kids It was a mish mash of kids with different ethnic backgrounds but you know what it was the making of me I got married in 1970 moved to the Mount got divorced in 1979 and moved to Pompey Portsmouth England and worked for the Admiralty as a Mech Engineer on surface weapons I went to Southampton University and got Masters Degrees in Materials Science and Structural Engineering In the late 80 s I became totally disillusioned with Britain and its stupid salary system I landed on America s shores in 1989 and secured a job as an engineer running a New York City Elevator Company By 1995 I attended Mass Institute of Technology and by 97 got Phd s in Traction Engineering and Computer Engineering Now I have the best boss I ever worked for ME Jon if you want to keep in touch my e mail its jayrox 56 msn com Thanks again for your response You are correct there aint many of us left out there John Ward Staten Island The Big Apple Paul Ujj says July 19th 2011 at 8 03 am Hi there Stuart I live in Australia have no Welsh background at all However some years ago we d become firm friends with a lovely retired couple who live in Swansea They visit us every 2 years or so stay at our home for some of their trip the rest is visiting their son who lives here in Sydney Mered is in his 80s had acquired a very nice miners lamp many years ago which was used in Abercynon Colliery He says it is a gas tester s lamp it came with a rubber ball which you used to suck up some gas pump it into a hole in the base of the lamp I liked it so much I bought it now sits here in our living area battered but much admired Apparently the gas tester who last owned this lamp was called Monty The lamp is an E Thomas Williams Ltd model G2 no 68 on it s tag I was wondering if there is any way to find out more about Monty when he worked at the colliery etc Is ther a list of employees somewhere perhaps I d be interested in any history I can associate with this lamp Cheers Paul Sydney Australia Michael says July 24th 2011 at 7 58 pm Les Steve i remember the pritchards in abercynon i was there a month or so ago and was amazed that the house they lived in was not there progress i suppose does anybody know where kevin and dylan are these days i was in school with them many years ago good footballers as i remember im back in new zealand now but am planning to come back over next year for the rugby god bless wales Steven Owen says September 16th 2011 at 10 37 am To paulujj i started this blogg sometime back my dad worked at abercynon as a very young boy eleven Years of age i also have a thomas williams lamp from abercynon colliery my wife sian bought it for me for christmas one year cried my etes out when i opened the parcel on xmas day the lamp no was one hundred and forty seven it must have been on the same lamp rack as your lamp scarey the lamps are still made in aberdare just up the valley visit thomasandwilliams website they still sell working lamps Steven Owen says September 16th 2011 at 10 41 am to jon john my dad left the mine and worked next door to sages in ab electronics its still ther today i did a final year project at treforrest polytechnic for sages to redesign thier shelve profiles because the shelve lugs that locked the shelve brackets in where breaking in all the supermarkets John Ward says September 20th 2011 at 4 26 pm To Steve Owen Hello Steve Great to hear from you I was a fitter at Sages and ended up in the drawing office at Ynysboeth and in the Harringay d office in London From my window I could see all the people going into AB s I knew loads of them I remember the brackets and cleats you are talking about and it comes as no surprise that they were breaking especially on the wider 15 and 18 wide shelves In those far off days I wasn t involved in the strength of materials of what we were drafting up because I was just a draughtsman wheras now everything I design is via CAD and Finite Analysis software In London I was involved in Otis Elevator components and assemblies which is why I am still into the Lift business here in the States I design the whole Elevator Package for a New and an Existing building and tell the Ardhitects what we will require to winch the elevator up up from the lowest landing to the highest landing Back to Wales I came from Carnetown originally and my Mam and Dad lived in Mountain Ash Road opposite the Spy pub so I didn t have far to go for a pint or over to the Workman s Hall to see a film Its all gone now but I have the memories they can t take that away from us Steve My Grandad worked in Abercynon Pit for approx 35 years my Dad ended up as Timekeeper at Albion Pit but started out at Abercynon You and I have a lot in common Steve If you ever wish to e mail me I am reachable at jayrox 56 msn com I have read your Blogs they are interesting and full of history Best Regards John Ward Abercynon boy in the Big Apple Dilwyn says November 6th 2011 at 7 45 pm Mike re post 24th July 2011 Mike i just read your post sadly Kevin passed away a couple of years ago im living in Cwmbach Aberdare now Hope life in New Zealand is good watched the Rugby World Cup on TV looks a lovely country I visit the site of the old colliery often i worked there for ten years and had some great times it is sad that our old house was pulled down when you think that where it was situated there is nothing there if you wish to contact my email address is dilwynpritchard aol com Jane Wood says January 29th 2012 at 10 57 am I am trying to trace relatvies of my mother s They lived in Cardiff Road Carentown Abercynon I believe my aunt Beatrice Rees lived there until the late 60 s at least possibly longer She married in the late 60 s and took the name Morgan My mothers name was Marion and would be 84 now Just wondering if anyone has any information at all about this family Thank you John Ward says March 4th 2012 at 2 18 am Hi Stuart It s nice to see this site up and running again I have tried over the past few months to see the latest incoming mail and it was zero It s quite interesting for locals like me I live 400 miles away but still keep tabs on what s going on in the valleys as if I was there It s a good site please keep it up Dr John Ward Staten Island New York City formerly Mountain Ash Rd Abercynon John Ward says March 4th 2012 at 2 20 am oops Stuart 4000miles way John Ward susan mcgovern says March 7th 2012 at 6 57 pm I am trying to trace relatives in abercynon my mother ethel lewis and her brothers and sisters were brought up in the basin her dad Gunner lewis was a miner They left in 1937 to live and work on welsh land settlements in pembrokeshire my grandfather lived in Martins terrace His sister Nin had a sweet shop in abercynon He also had a brother Reg and a sister Annie Andrew Davies says March 18th 2012 at 12 22 am Hi just been reading through some of the comments and wondered if any of you knew my mother or any of her family her name was Dorothy o brien and lived at 74 nant y fedw she was born in 1948 but had older sibling s her parent s name s were Maurice O brien and Hilda O brien there children were Kathleen Maurine john william Pauline Dorothy My mother Michael and Sheelagh Would be great to hear from anyone who knew them John Ward says April 26th 2012 at 2 53 pm To Andrew Davies Andrew did your mother go to the Catholic School in Miskin Mountain Ash John Ward New York City U S A John Ward says April 27th 2012 at 5 56 pm To Andrew Davies Hello again It must be deja Vu but the Dorothy O Brien I knew when I lived in Wales was in the same class as me in the Catholic School in the Miskin in the Mount That would be from 1955 to 1963 She passed to go to Aberdare College of Further Education I knew Dorothy s Dad because he used to attend St Thomas Church in Abercynon where I was an altar boy I reckon we are talking the same family John Ward HUW WILLIAMS says January 9th 2013 at 12 25 pm my name is huw williams born in abercynon 1945 lived at 67 lock st my dad worked at the colliery as delivery coal driver tommy north my mother was from carnetown lizzie mary thomas all my relitives lived at carnetown aunty sophie uncle will hansie thomas josie thomas bob thomas i can remember the times we would go to the empress in the 60s where we would dance to tommy scott and the seneters also to the railway canteen every sat and sunday for a sing song i went to work on the footplate at abercynon shedswhere i worked with great people like ron richards wilf bowden jp howard hall les emery bill jenkins cyril howe great old men from the past fantastic village in 1968 i married a ponty girl and moved there i am still in contact with many friends from abercynon HUW WILLIAMS says January 10th 2013 at 8 15 pm great site stuart Keith Deek Jones says January 12th 2013 at 4 47 pm It was most interesting to read the stories and comments about Abercynon Colliery I started as an Apprentice Surveyor at Albion Colliery on its closure I was transferred to Abercynon I was not too happy there for the first six months as it was a lot different to Albion However I certainly got to like the pit after When we linked up with Lady Windsor Colliery it wasn t quite the same I finished at Abercynon in March 1976 when I joined Thyssen GB ltd who were Mining Contractors I will always have fond memories of the pit and the men Sadly I was involved with the preperation of the shafts for filling a very difficult job in view of my fond memories john matthews says January 24th 2013 at 2 52 pm Hi I was born in 1949 my family lived in 16 plantation road abercynon my grandfather Hopton Matthews had a shoe repairing business in ynysmeurig road My two brothers David and Alan and my parents Olwen and Vivian Matthews worked in A B Metals in Ynysboeth I attended carnetown infants and juniors and then abercynon secondary otherwise known as the clock school I remember john ward as your father did his best to teach me the piano but despite his best efforts i failed to aquire that skill Also jon hughes of nash street if i have the right person you have an older brother peter Just to update you the clock school has recently been demolished and a new school is being built this will also replace carnetown infants and juniors and abertaf juniors I still live in the village although it has changed a lot from my youth Most of the lovely old buildings have been demolished namely the workmens hall the spy and junction pubs the police station and magistrates court several chapels and churces the empress dance hall where tom jones started his career Andrew Davies says January 28th 2013 at 11 52 am To John Ward Yes my mother did go to the catholic school her dad my grandfather came from ireland and had quite a strong accent i believe it was in the 60 s that he had a motorbike accident in which he lost his leg Seven Owen says February 6th 2013 at 12 04 pm Hi Dilwyn Steve here my Mam Dads first house together after marrying was a singleroom bedsit in Ivy House what was it like can you remember Dilwyn says March 29th 2013 at 7 32 pm Hi Steve i do not remember the house being a bedsit but it may well have been used before we moved there in the early 60s the rooms at the house were all quite big there was a old cottage attached to the side of ivy house that had about 4 rooms as i recall the cottage was not used by us and was pulled down in the 70s Hope you are well vernon says April 28th 2013 at 10 22 pm HELLO EVERYONE my name is Vernon

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  • Ten Principles Tai Chi - » About
    know It is likely that Louis grandfather was a contemporary of Yang Cheng fu or of one of Cheng fu s students from the 1920 1930 s If you need to you can contact Stuart directly via at stuart at stuartherbert com and comments left on this site are always welcome too To help you find your way around here s a list of what I have on the web site so far Read about the benefits of practicing T ai Chi as discovered in independent studies Learn more about the style I practice Ng Family Yang Style and see a video of me practicing the style Learn more about the classes I teach Download the notes I give out to my T ai Chi students See a list of T ai Chi books that I like and recommend to my students Subscribe to my regular T ai Chi podcasts And of course don t forget to subscribe to my blog s RSS feed so that you can keep up to date as I post new articles on my blog About The Author Stuart has been writing PHP applications since 2003 and has been contributing to open source software since 1994 He was an early writer for php architect a co author of the Official Zend Certification Study Guide for PHP 4 and a regular speaker at conferences and user groups since 2004 When he s not designing software Stuart loves to explore the world through a camera lens spend time with his beloved guitars and continue his study to T ai Chi Chu an Taijiquan One Comment Gabriella says January 14th 2009 at 12 36 am Hi I really like your blog and because you love Tai Chi you might be interested in coming to the Chinese fundraiser Banquet

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/taichi/about/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Ten Principles Tai Chi - » Benefits For Health
    boosts Tai Chi options talking about research at Oregon Research Institute Marin Independent Journal Tai chi teachers shows how to age with grace William C C Chen Medical Studies Improved Circulation Sources Marin Independent Journal Tai chi teachers shows how to age with grace Stance Width Sources Tai Chi Marie Chinese Exercises Benefit Older Adults Improved Posture Sources William C C Chen Medical Studies Lower Blood Pressure Sources William C C Chen Medical Studies Mental Emotional and or Spiritual Enhancement Sources Tai Chi Marie Chinese Exercises Benefit Older Adults Sun Herald Tai Chi is good for the body and soul Feeling All Over Better Sources Mail Tribune Grant boosts Tai Chi options talking about research at Oregon Research Institute Slow Down Improved Patience Sources Sun Herald Tai Chi is good for the body and soul Marin Independent Journal Tai chi teachers shows how to age with grace Physical Therapy Sources William C C Chen Medical Studies Relaxation Sources William C C Chen Medical Studies Improved Heart Lung Function Sources William C C Chen Medical Studies Reduce Stress Sources William C C Chen Medical Studies Central Ohio Tai Chi It s great stress relief Reduced Risk of Disease Sources John Crewdson Tai Chi the natural flu shot citing a study into shingles Keeps You Fit And Active As You Get Older Sources BBC Sedentary life speeds up aging Ireland Online Midler to retire after Vegas residency If you know of any additional web sites that report on the benefits of taking up Tai Chi please mention them in the comments below About The Author Stuart has been writing PHP applications since 2003 and has been contributing to open source software since 1994 He was an early writer for php architect a co author of the Official Zend Certification Study Guide for

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  • Ten Principles Tai Chi - » Ng Family Yang Style
    ai Chi Ch uan student looking for like minded people to practice your push hands and martial arts with and to examine and debate the philosophy that underpins all T ai Chi practice then you d be most welcome to our private classes How We Teach Our teaching philosophy is that stances and shapes make the form The movement between shapes comes from daily practice between classes Once you have the form we use the form together to explore each of the underlying ten principles of our form Your instructor will open each class by leading the group through the cultural exercises to ensure everyone is properly warmed up This is followed by a standing meditation exercise and then your instructor will lead the group through all the parts of the form that have already been taught After that your instructor will review and correct the parts of the form that have already been taught After a short break there s normally a kettle available so feel free to bring your own tea and coffee along your instructor will demonstrate the night s new moves before breaking the moves down into smaller chunks for the group to practice and learn Finally each class closes with your instructor leading the group through all the parts of the form that have already been taught including the night s new moves Questions are welcome and encouraged throughout each class Don t be afraid to ask at any time and don t feel that your question is silly in any way The only silly question is the one that never gets asked Learning Aids The principle method of teaching is demonstration by your instructor We back that up with additional resources to help you both between classes and to be a reference for the rest of your life We provide handouts for the cultural exercises and each part of the form The handouts are broken down into the chunks that you learn each week We offer an audio CD containing the same instruction for playing the form that is used in each class This CD costs a nominal fee to cover copying costs We offer a DVD containing a complete demonstration of the form This DVD costs a nominal fee to cover copying costs We create regular mini podcasts on Audioboo discussing whatever important points have come up in each class Additionally we are working on creating video lessons for students to download and view on their computers iPods and so on We re always looking for additional ways that we can help and support our students If there s anything you can think of that would help please let us know What To Wear To Class There is no need to purchase any sort of martial art uniform We recommend loose comfortable clothing such as T shirts and jogging bottoms In the winter months classrooms can be cold when we arrive so a comfortable jumper or fleece during the winter months can be

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/taichi/ng-family-style/ (2016-05-02)
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