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  • Stuart on PHP - » 2013 » April
    a regular speaker at conferences and user groups since 2004 When he s not designing software Stuart loves to explore the world through a camera lens spend time with his beloved guitars and continue his study to T ai Chi Chu an Taijiquan Be the first to leave a comment Latest Photos Categories phpnw 1 Beginner 2 Intermediate 3 Advanced Brighton PHP Conferences Opinion phix PHP In Business PSR Servers and Hosting Storyplayer Talks Toolbox Training Uncategorized Archives February 2016 January 2016 November 2015 October 2015 August 2015 March 2015 January 2014 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 February 2012 January 2012 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 April 2011 March 2011 February 2011 October 2010 August 2010 July 2010 February 2010 January 2010 October 2009 September 2009 August 2009 May 2009 April 2009 March 2009 February 2009 January 2009 December 2008 November 2008 October 2008 September 2008 August 2008 June 2008 May 2008 April 2008 March 2008 January 2008 December 2007 November 2007 October 2007 July 2007 April 2007 March 2007 February 2007 January 2007 This Month April 2013 M T

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/php/2013/04/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Stuart on PHP - » 2013 » March
    ChangeLog is available I m starting to get requests for documentation and portability fixes for Windows users I don t run Windows on any of my computers so if there s anyone out there who d be interested in helping out please let me know About The Author Stuart has been writing PHP applications since 2003 and has been contributing to open source software since 1994 He was an early writer for php architect a co author of the Official Zend Certification Study Guide for PHP 4 and a regular speaker at conferences and user groups since 2004 When he s not designing software Stuart loves to explore the world through a camera lens spend time with his beloved guitars and continue his study to T ai Chi Chu an Taijiquan Be the first to leave a comment Latest Photos Categories phpnw 1 Beginner 2 Intermediate 3 Advanced Brighton PHP Conferences Opinion phix PHP In Business PSR Servers and Hosting Storyplayer Talks Toolbox Training Uncategorized Archives February 2016 January 2016 November 2015 October 2015 August 2015 March 2015 January 2014 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 February 2012 January 2012 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 April 2011 March 2011 February 2011 October 2010 August 2010 July 2010 February 2010 January 2010 October 2009 September 2009 August 2009 May 2009 April 2009 March 2009 February 2009 January 2009 December 2008 November 2008 October 2008 September 2008 August 2008 June 2008 May 2008 April 2008 March 2008 January 2008 December 2007 November 2007 October 2007 July 2007 April 2007 March 2007 February 2007 January 2007 This Month March 2013 M T W T F S S Dec Apr 1 2 3 4 5

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/php/2013/03/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Stuart on PHP - » 2012 » December
    more readable by having all method names start with a verb I find that it makes code more self descriptive and that it s much easier for casual contributors to grok So instead of this logger emergency Captain she canna take no more we could instead have had logger logEmergency Captain she canna take no more Like I say a small thing but in my experience it s improving all of the small things that leads to big successes especially in larger code bases Handling The Exception Parameter Properly To paraphrase the PSR 3 standard says this about the context parameter here s a list of key value parameters but one is special That but is a code smell Not being able to treat all of the key value parameters equally slightly increases the complexity of handling context increases the performance cost of logging and forces the Logger implementation to do things that PHP could handle for us A better solution would be to move the exception out of the context and make it a separate parameter like this logEmergency message context array Exception cause null This would allow PHP to make sure that only a genuine Exception was passed into the log method and would allow the implementation to treat all of the key value pairs in context equally This is a cleaner interface to implement Log Level Constants RFC 5424 defines the log levels as an ordered set of integers This is deliberate as it makes it trivial to say only log warnings and above Unfortunately because it was difficult to crowbar this into Monolog the decision was taken to go with strings for the log level constants This regrettably increases the complexity of all other loggers If you look at pull request to add PSR 3 to Monolog you ll notice that Monolog is explicitly relying on the value of the PSR 3 constants to map them directly onto Monolog class constants 375 public function log level message array context array 376 377 if is string level defined CLASS strtoupper level 378 level constant CLASS strtoupper level 379 380 381 return this addRecord level message context 382 This is done because ironically Monolog already uses numerical log levels internally with the debug level having a value of 100 and the emergency level having the value of 600 There was obviously the risk of Monolog log level constants being passed in instead of the PSR 3 constants where it would have been impossible to tell them apart if they were both numeric I m sure other existing loggers probably face similar issues It s a tricky issue but on balance I think the wrong decision was made here for the wrong reason and the community would have been better served longer term if PSR 3 had supported the RFC 5424 values for the log level constants Final Thoughts PSR 3 isn t objectionable it s just that it could have been a bit better than it is I

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/php/2012/12/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Stuart on PHP - » 2012 » November
    more about you about what you need to do to be prepared for when you join the industry either during an industrial placement year or when you graduate and leave academia Ours is a multi disciplined industry where things change rapidly so to help you prepare I ve finished off the book with some lists of the fundamental skills that industry expects you to have before you start your first job Getting Hired is a free ebook released under a Creative Commons licence I hope you find it useful About The Author Stuart has been writing PHP applications since 2003 and has been contributing to open source software since 1994 He was an early writer for php architect a co author of the Official Zend Certification Study Guide for PHP 4 and a regular speaker at conferences and user groups since 2004 When he s not designing software Stuart loves to explore the world through a camera lens spend time with his beloved guitars and continue his study to T ai Chi Chu an Taijiquan 2 comments Latest Photos Categories phpnw 1 Beginner 2 Intermediate 3 Advanced Brighton PHP Conferences Opinion phix PHP In Business PSR Servers and Hosting Storyplayer Talks Toolbox Training Uncategorized Archives February 2016 January 2016 November 2015 October 2015 August 2015 March 2015 January 2014 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 February 2012 January 2012 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 April 2011 March 2011 February 2011 October 2010 August 2010 July 2010 February 2010 January 2010 October 2009 September 2009 August 2009 May 2009 April 2009 March 2009 February 2009 January 2009 December 2008 November 2008 October 2008 September 2008 August 2008 June 2008 May 2008 April

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/php/2012/11/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Stuart on PHP - » 2012 » October
    v1 4 of DataSift s HubFlow Git extension HubFlow is a branching strategy for Git and GitHub based on Vincent Driessen s original GitFlow model Changes In This Release The main change in this release is that you now must merge your feature into the develop branch via a pull request before using the git hf feature finish command You can override this behaviour and get feature finish to do the merge for you by using the f flag The full changelog is available on our GitHub pages Upgrading From An Older Release To upgrade to this release please run sudo git hf upgrade If that doesn t work because you re on an older version of HubFlow that doesn t have the upgrade command please re install git clone https github com datasift gitflow cd gitflow sudo install sh About The Author Stuart has been writing PHP applications since 2003 and has been contributing to open source software since 1994 He was an early writer for php architect a co author of the Official Zend Certification Study Guide for PHP 4 and a regular speaker at conferences and user groups since 2004 When he s not designing software Stuart loves to explore the world through a camera lens spend time with his beloved guitars and continue his study to T ai Chi Chu an Taijiquan Be the first to leave a comment Latest Photos Categories phpnw 1 Beginner 2 Intermediate 3 Advanced Brighton PHP Conferences Opinion phix PHP In Business PSR Servers and Hosting Storyplayer Talks Toolbox Training Uncategorized Archives February 2016 January 2016 November 2015 October 2015 August 2015 March 2015 January 2014 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 February 2012 January

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/php/2012/10/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Stuart on PHP - » 2012 » September
    their own pace we needed to adopt a common way of working together with Git and GitHub so that the company continued to scale well It had to be a way that allowed every developer to take full advantage of Git especially when it comes to committing their work early and often It had to allow developers to form ad hoc teams that worked at their own pace Remote working is a fact of life these days and it had to work just as well whether everyone is in the office or working from somewhere else It also had to ensure that only work that had been finished made its way into any of our releases We wanted to make sure that there was an opportunity to review every change before it went into a release Code reviews play an important part in delivering high quality work time after time after time We didn t want pending releases to hold up new development ever And if something did screw up in production we needed a way to go back to our last known good version fix it and release that all without disrupting any pending releases or existing ad hoc teams Finally it had to be easy to teach to people who are new to Git and GitHub preferably by wrapping complicated Git operations up inside a single command each time Those are the benefits that HubFlow gives us And at phpnw12 I ll be teaching everyone who attends my tutorial session how to get those benefits too What makes me qualified to teach this topic And what makes me qualified to be teaching at all I ve got 18 years of experience setting up and or running software configuration management taking in systems as diverse as RCS CVS Perforce Continuus Clearcase Subversion Mercurial and Git I ve done this with and for organisations as small as a one man team all the way through to large international corporates I ve even built a version control system for one company in the past Git is much better And I was around long enough to see and learn from the failures as well as the successes I m a big believer that success teaches you a bit but failure teaches you more Plus I m the author of the HubFlow strategy and the maintainer of the HubFlow extension for Git It simply isn t possible for me to distill all of that rich and lengthy experience down into the documentation that I ve written for HubFlow I think the documentation is good I wouldn t have put my name to it otherwise but I think you can learn even more from me in person I m a qualified teacher of adults I m trained how to teach and I ve had a lot of practice doing so My first PHP conference appearance was back in 2004 on Marco s php cruise and since then I ve spoken at the PHP NorthWest

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/php/2012/09/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Stuart on PHP - » 2012 » August
    for controlling real web browsers such as Internet Explorer Firefox and Chrome and BrowserMob Proxy adds in essential missing capabilities such as checking HTTP status codes and injecting headers for HTTP Basic Auth I ve recently forked BrowserMob Proxy on GitHub and started to make tweaks to it for work Thought I d mention it in case anyone else out there is using BrowserMob Proxy and would find our tweaks useful too We ll be submitting our tweaks upstream in due course Executable JAR Maven POM file updated to build browsermob proxy X XX standalone jar an executable JAR file during the package phase Very handy if you re running and testing it via the remote API Upstream s browsermob proxy X XX bin zip is still available and is now always built during the install phase features endpoint a new REST API endpoint allowing you to GET and POST and DELETE feature flag settings We re using this to enable disable any new features that might break backwards compatibility in case you want to use existing BrowserMob Proxy REST clients with our tweaked version Said REST clients can also use this to see which features are present enabled enhancedReplies by default BrowserMob Proxy isn t the most chatty of REST services Switch this feature on POST enhancedReplies true to config enhancedReplies and now every response includes either a success TRUE or an error TRUE field for your client to easily understand what has happened More logging we ve added some additional log messages throughout the ProxyResource REST API to make it easier to debug browsermob proxy REST API clients This logging is off by default and is switched on by POSTing paramLogs true to config paramLogs and or POSTING actionLogs true to config actionLogs additional header GET DELETE API we ve extended the REST API for additional HTTP request headers to now allow you to GET proxy port header name and to DELETE proxy port header name if you need to You can also delete all additional HTTP request headers in one go by DELETE proxy port headers REST API for HTTP Basic Auth BrowserMob Proxy s existing support for HTTP Basic Auth is now available via PUT proxy port basicAuth domain One of the key features missing from WebDriver This is a convenience feature it could be done by injecting the headers directly into BrowserMob Proxy exception handling by default BrowserMob Proxy lets exceptions bubble up to the servlet container which unfortunately sends back HTML errors rather than a JSON error To make things a little easier for REST clients I ve tweaked the REST API to trap exceptions and return back a hopefully suitable error class This will probably need more tweaking before it provides useful information all the time Bookmark this page I ll be updating it as we complete more tweaks to BrowserMob Proxy About The Author Stuart has been writing PHP applications since 2003 and has been contributing to open source software since 1994

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/php/2012/08/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Stuart on PHP - » 2012 » July
    not a nice thing to have to do whether it s an employee or a supplier I always want to see the best in someone and I always want them to have the success they deserve But it s part of the job and you do no one any favours by not facing up to it if it has to be done Why Do You Aim So Low What about higher standards How come I seem to be able to afford them when others feel they cannot When I was a kid I sat a lot of exams throughout my school years but I was never remotely interested in how well I d done versus everyone else What I cared about was measuring myself against what was possible How high could I consistently score What was the next level up of test that I could sit What could I learn from other sources How could I apply it play with it really get inside it to start to actually understand it a bit Where did the hard work need to be put it to take it further still How could I have fun with it I ve applied this approach to everything I do whether it s software engineering writing speaking music photography or my martial arts And I have found it to be liberating My constraints are my slow witted mind my somewhat broken body and the march of time and I am in competition not with you and not with failure but only myself In a world of frankly very low standards if all you do is measure yourself against the people around you then it really doesn t take much to seem like you re doing pretty well There are a lot of advantages to being ahead it s true and evolution does favour the lazy but you ll never amount to anything much and you ll never achieve anything worth a damn if you don t lift your gaze look out to the stars and see what can really be done This world is full of people with amazing potential who never realise that potential They re just a waste of space You can be better tomorrow than you are today Aim high You can do it Everyone can do it You just have to choose We don t have a lot of time to achieve things in life and as you get older you become more and more aware of just how quickly the days are passing Every day you spend just trying to get through the day you can t get that day back It s gone forever And you never know when fate is going to cut your days suddenly short Make the most of them Achieve something worth while and aim high when you do About The Author Stuart has been writing PHP applications since 2003 and has been contributing to open source software since 1994 He was an early writer for

    Original URL path: http://blog.stuartherbert.com/php/2012/07/ (2016-05-02)
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