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  • In usability we trust | UX and all things web
    I ve been receiving several emails from readers of my book Beginning Google Maps API 3 that has a problem adding information to multiple InfoWindows when loading markers dynamically via JSON data In my book I have in fact described how to add multiple markers from JSON and how to attach unique InfoWindows to each of them What I haven t described is how to get the JSON data to actually show up in the InfoWindows This tutorial aims to describe how to do just that Continue reading Hello Meetod March 18 2012 Gabriel Svennerberg 0 Comments As some of you might know I left the life as an employee in September last year to pursue a new career as an independent consultant Since then I ve been busy establishing myself on the market Continue reading The Little Book on CoffeeScript by Alex MacCaw March 11 2012 Gabriel Svennerberg 1 Comment This book is a great introduction to the beautiful pseudo JavaScript language CoffeeScript It s written by Alex MacCaw that is also the author of JavaScript Web Applications a book I reviewed a few month ago Continue reading My slides from World Usability Day November 14 2011 Gabriel Svennerberg 0 Comments Here s my slides from my talk on World Usability Day The event gathered around 90 people and was held at Visma in Växjö Sweden I ve made the slides publicly available through SlideShare but please note that the Slides are in Swedish Continue reading Watch my talk on Design for Influence online November 10 2011 Gabriel Svennerberg 0 Comments Today is World Usability Day and we celebrate that here in Växjö by having a lunch event where among other things I will talk about Design for Influence The event will start at 12pm and go on for about 1 hour It will be streamed live and you re more than welcome to join us Continue reading Is your site mobile friendly November 1 2011 Gabriel Svennerberg 0 Comments Google has recently launched a new site to encourage Mobile Friendly Websites It s called GoMo and contains among lots of useful information also a test to see how mobile friendly your site is I tested In usability we trust on it and I m happy to report that it scored 4 out of 4 on the mobile friendliness scale Continue reading World Usability Day 2011 October 31 2011 Gabriel Svennerberg 0 Comments World Usability Day is on November 10 and me and a few other good people are giving a lunch seminar on this years theme Education Designing for Social Change Continue reading Johanna Wallentin webday se October 14 2011 Gabriel Svennerberg 0 Comments Extremely professional and knowledgeable in Web Development Also since Gabriel always delivers high quality on time he s the first partner we turn to when we need external resources for larger projects Johanna Wallentin www webday se JavaScript Web Applications by Alex MacCaw October 12 2011 Gabriel Svennerberg 0 Comments JavaScript Web Applications is

    Original URL path: http://www.svennerberg.com/ (2016-04-28)
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  • About | In usability we trust
    do things like designing applications building state of the art Web Apps and helping my clients to succeed in their digital endeavors Google Maps Book At one point in life I was very in to the Google Maps API and wrote a lot of articles and tutorials about it here on In usability we trust That eventually lead to me writing a book about the then newly released version 3 of the API The book is called Beginning Google Maps API 3 and is published through Apress You can read more about it on my book page Beginning Google Maps API 3 is available for purchase from Amazon com Design Principles FTW As a side project I run a site called Design Principles FTW which is a curated collection of Design Principles I m also working on a book on the topic Public speaking I occasionally speak at conferences like Webbdagarna and UX open I m also available to talk at companies and to run UX courses My latest talks Get in touch Want to work together or just discuss something Contact me at gabriel at svennerberg dot com My social networks Twitter Google LinkedIn About me My name is

    Original URL path: http://www.svennerberg.com/about/ (2016-04-28)
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  • Lean UX by Jeff Gothelf | In usability we trust
    rethink how we do our work But how do we do that One way is by reading Jeff Gothems book Lean UX which explains how to incorporate a different more lean mindset to the UX process He proposes a workflow with more focus on trying out hypotheses in the real world and less focus on creating deliverables Lean UX describes a way of doing UX work in an Agile fashion It does so in a very clear and easy to digest fashion Jeff draws from his long experience in leading agile UX work when he describes the pitfalls and opportunities So what is Lean UX Lean is all about reducing waste and it s the same with Lean UX The book outlines a few core principles to do this Less focus on producing design documentation The value lies in delivering the product A focus on collaboration between Designers Developers QA and Business People By breaking down the silos we get a much more effective design process and ultimately a better designed product The realisation that what we think are good solutions are just hypothesis that need to be tested in the real world The key is to do this continously and effectively Design for outcomes instead of features By focusing on the outcome the team is free to find the best solution to the problem instead of being locked down to a certain feature that might not be the optimal solution My verdict Lean UX is an easy to digest practical book on how to incorporate a more effective way of developing software It provides both valuable insights and practical techniques I highly recommend it for anyone involved in software development and by that I don t mean just designers I mean anyone involved Book information Title Lean UX Applying

    Original URL path: http://www.svennerberg.com/2013/05/lean-ux-by-jeff-gothelf/ (2016-04-28)
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  • Gabriel Svennerberg | In usability we trust
    31 Comments Recently I ve been receiving several emails from readers of my book Beginning Google Maps API 3 that has a problem adding information to multiple InfoWindows when loading markers dynamically via JSON data In my book I have in fact described how to add multiple markers from JSON and how to attach unique InfoWindows to each of them What I haven t described is how to get the JSON data to actually show up in the InfoWindows This tutorial aims to describe how to do just that Continue reading Hello Meetod March 18 2012 Gabriel Svennerberg 0 Comments As some of you might know I left the life as an employee in September last year to pursue a new career as an independent consultant Since then I ve been busy establishing myself on the market Continue reading The Little Book on CoffeeScript by Alex MacCaw March 11 2012 Gabriel Svennerberg 1 Comment This book is a great introduction to the beautiful pseudo JavaScript language CoffeeScript It s written by Alex MacCaw that is also the author of JavaScript Web Applications a book I reviewed a few month ago Continue reading My slides from World Usability Day November 14 2011 Gabriel Svennerberg 0 Comments Here s my slides from my talk on World Usability Day The event gathered around 90 people and was held at Visma in Växjö Sweden I ve made the slides publicly available through SlideShare but please note that the Slides are in Swedish Continue reading Watch my talk on Design for Influence online November 10 2011 Gabriel Svennerberg 0 Comments Today is World Usability Day and we celebrate that here in Växjö by having a lunch event where among other things I will talk about Design for Influence The event will start at 12pm and go on for about 1 hour It will be streamed live and you re more than welcome to join us Continue reading Is your site mobile friendly November 1 2011 Gabriel Svennerberg 0 Comments Google has recently launched a new site to encourage Mobile Friendly Websites It s called GoMo and contains among lots of useful information also a test to see how mobile friendly your site is I tested In usability we trust on it and I m happy to report that it scored 4 out of 4 on the mobile friendliness scale Continue reading World Usability Day 2011 October 31 2011 Gabriel Svennerberg 0 Comments World Usability Day is on November 10 and me and a few other good people are giving a lunch seminar on this years theme Education Designing for Social Change Continue reading Johanna Wallentin webday se October 14 2011 Gabriel Svennerberg 0 Comments Extremely professional and knowledgeable in Web Development Also since Gabriel always delivers high quality on time he s the first partner we turn to when we need external resources for larger projects Johanna Wallentin www webday se JavaScript Web Applications by Alex MacCaw October 12 2011 Gabriel Svennerberg 0 Comments JavaScript

    Original URL path: http://www.svennerberg.com/author/svennerberg/ (2016-04-28)
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  • Stop Building Single Applications and Start Building Eco-systems | In usability we trust
    s not typically mobile tasks See 40 of people use their phone in the bathroom and other interesting facts Building multi device eco systems What this means is that we can no longer just think one application on one platform when we build software to solve a problem We need to consider the bigger picture How to solve that problem in a wider context The future of computing lies in building eco systems of applications for different devices that solves a particular problem But having to provide software on multiple devices How do we design build and maintain these without getting overburdened by the complexity and diversity Strong APIs I ve been thinking long and hard about this and the answer I ve come up with is this Build a strong and easy to use API with an eco system of simple clients using it The trick here is to put as much of the complexity as possible in the API and make it as easy as possible for the clients to use it This way the API is the piece you invest most in and that will live for a longer period of time It will provide a foundation on which you can build relatively simple clients around The core of my thinking is that you need to make it as easy and painless as possible to build the client applications New technologies comes and goes who knows what the next wave of connected devices will be Smart watches smart glasses or something else Whatever it is we need to make sure that we can be on that platform with relative ease without having to start from scratch What will the next wave of smart devices be Will it be Smart glasses Smart watches or something else Go REST I ve been talking broadly about API s here but what I advocate is to build a REST API REST is not a technology it s an approach It relies entirely on HTTP for communication so it s virtually technology agnostic This is good It doesn t require you to use a specific technology to build clients No matter what the technology they will likely be able to communicate via HTTP Keeping it technology agnostic is a key aspect Given that your API will live for a longer period of time you can t predict what new tech will be introduced and you can t predict which type of clients you will build a couple of years from now Use a simple Data Format Just as you should invest in a solid API You should invest in a robust data format The format should be simple enough to not add a lot of overhead but capable enough to transfer fairly complex data models I ve found JSON to be a good candidate for this It s simpler than XML or SOAP shudder but can communicate lists and nested objects An additional benefit is that since it s really a JavaScript

    Original URL path: http://www.svennerberg.com/2013/05/stop-building-single-applications-start-building-eco-systems/ (2016-04-28)
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  • Future Proof Your Methods With Options Objects | In usability we trust
    an object hence the name method Anatomy of a function Objectify Ok so how do we get around this issue The answer is simple Use one options object instead of several arguments It solves all of the problems listed above Check this out you don t have to remember in which order to supply the arguments no need to supply all arguments on all calls easy to provide default values easy to expand the number of arguments without breaking functionality Ok so how s this done then Let s take a look at the code for constructing the method var bio function options var id options id 1 name options name Empty description options description Empty The first thing you ll notice is that instead of taking multiple arguments the method only takes one called options But then you might be wondering what s going on inside the function Inside the function is a check that make sure that the object has certain properties and saves those into local variables If a property is missing a default value is provided Calling the objectified method Ok so now you know how to create the method but what about using it Let s look at some code Creating an options object var options id 1 name Luke Skywalker description Young talented man Calling the method bio options In the code above an options object is first created and populated with the values that you want to pass to the method The options object is then used as the single argument when calling the method Note The options object is created as an object literal which is a convenient way of creating objects on the fly Extending the object Now what if you need to add another argument No problem just change your method to embrace the new argument You could do it in one of two ways By providing default values By checking if the property exists and react accordingly The first way is how it s implemented in the example so you just need to follow that same pattern The other way is sort of the same thing but a little different Instead of providing a default value you can simply check if the property exists or not when you need to use it Let s try that with a new argument profession var bio function options var id options id 1 name options name Empty description options description Empty if options profession alert name is a profession else Some sort of fallback Now even if you call the method without supplying the profession property the code won t break Since we re checking for its existence the method will handle it gracefully This means that you don t have to worry about breaking existing functionality Pro tip You could make the call to the method more terse by creating the options object on the fly when calling the method like this bio id 1 name Luke Skywalker description Young talented

    Original URL path: http://www.svennerberg.com/2013/03/future-proof-your-methods-with-options-objects/ (2016-04-28)
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  • The Power of Combinators | In usability we trust
    wrapper width 980px margin 0 auto Affected elements with the ID Selector applied So far no surprises You re probably already familiar with these selectors and with that brief recap out of the way lets move on to more intesting things namely the CSS Combinators The Combinators The combinators are used in conjunction with the basic selectors As the name suggest they enable you to combine other selectors in different ways so that you don t have to have a class or ID on every single element that you want to target So why is this good then Well it serves you well to keep the HTML and CSS as separated as possible The least amount of extra attributes you have in the HTML the better It will not only reduce the page size but also make maintenance easier To learn more about the benefits of keeping the HTML and CSS as separate as possible read the article Separation of Concerns http codecraftingblueprints com post 15732181414 separation of concerns which explores the benefits in greater deatail Now lets move on to the combinators CSS Combinators There are four different combinators in CSS and they each bring their own unique benefit The Descendant Selector The Child Selector The Adjacent Sibling Selector The General Sibling Selector The Descendant Selector The Descendant Selector is just two or more selectors after each other separated by whitespace If for example you only want to target the p elements inside of the div class facts you could write facts p color ff0080 With this code only p elements that lives below the element with the class facts are targeted Affected elements with the Descendant Selector applied The Child Selector The Child Selector is a bit more specific than the previous one It looks almost the same but you add a greater than character between the two selectors Doing this you make sure that only the elements that sits on the level immediately below the first selector are targeted wrapper p color ff0080 Now only the p elements immediately below div id wrapper are affected Affected elements with the Adjacent Child Selector applied This is great for dealing with deeply nested structures where you want the styling to only target one level A common use case is when styling drop down menus These are often constructed with nested lists ul where you want the lists to have different styling depending on which level they appear The Adjacent Sibling Selector The Adjecent Sibling Selector targets only elements that s immediately after an element on the same level in the DOM tree It s used by inserting a plus between the first and the second selector h1 p color ff0080 Now only the p that s directly after the h1 is affected Affected element with the Adjacent Sibling Selector applied A common use case for the Adjacent Sibling Selector is when you want the first paragraph in an article to have bigger text than the rest of the paragraphs

    Original URL path: http://www.svennerberg.com/2013/01/the-power-of-combinators/ (2016-04-28)
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  • Click Areas for a Brave New Multi-Device World | In usability we trust
    2 cm which translates to about 45 57 pixels on a screen You ve probably experienced the frustration yourself when trying to click small links that are tightly packed on a smart phone It can be really hard to hit the right target and that s not the experience you want people to have with your web site Image credit sochacki info Recommended touch target sizes Apple iOS Human Interface Guidelines state that a touch target should be at least 44 x 44 points large The reason they re using points instead of pixels is that points can be used for both standard and retina displays Microsoft s Windows Phone UI Design and Interaction Guide suggest that the size of the touch target should be 34 pixels with an absolute minimum of 26 pixel And Nokia s Developer Guidelines state that the touch target should be at least 1 x 1 cm I actually I think that Nokia has the best guidelines since it states its minimum dimensions in cm I mean 44 pixels can be very different on different screens and devices Just think about the iPad and the iPad Mini They both have the same amount of pixels but a click area of 44 44 pixels will be a lot smaller on the iPad Mini What you don t have in size you can make up in space Another interesting aspect of this is that if you absolutely do need to have relatively small touch targets you can partly compensate that by increasing the space between the targets By doing that you limit the chance of missed targets The rule is The smaller the target the bigger the gap If you absolutely need small click targets you can save the day by increasing the space between them In Practice Enough already I think you get why it s important to have big enough click touch targets The question is how is it done in practice The first thing to recognize is that the clickable area could be well outside the visible area of the object Regular links For links in a list the easiest way to increase the clickable area is to increase the padding Instead of having a padding on the list item you should have it on the link itself In this example I simply add a 10 pixel padding to a link Watch how that dramatically increases its clickable area The faint red background indicates the clickable area li a padding 10px Checkboxes and Radiobuttons For checkboxes and radiobuttons which are often really small the trick is to put them inside a label and add a generous padding to it By connecting the checkbox and the label via the id and the for attributes the entire area of the label is clickable and toggles the checkbox HTML label for foo input type checkbox name foo id foo value bar A padded checkbox label CSS label display block padding 10px Without this special treatment the click

    Original URL path: http://www.svennerberg.com/2013/01/click-areas-for-a-brave-new-multi-device-world/ (2016-04-28)
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