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  • Signing and Preparing an Android Application for Release - Techotopia
    Essentials Android 6 Edition Print and eBook ePub PDF Kindle editions contain 65 chapters Creating a Keystore File The Keystore selection screen Figure 44 2 provides the option either to use an existing keystore file or to generate a new file If you already have a keystore file simply click on the Browse button to locate and load the file If you have yet to create a file however select the Create new keystore menu option and enter a file system path and file name location into which the keystore file should be saved Figure 44 2 Next enter a strong password with which to protect the keystore file into both the Password and Confirm fields before clicking on Next Generating a Private Key The next step is to generate a new private key which will be used to sign the application package At this point the Key Creation screen Figure 44 3 of the Export Wizard should be displayed Within this screen enter the following information An alias by which the key will be referenced This can be any sequence of characters through only the first 8 are used by the system A suitably strong password to protect the key The number of years for which the key is to be valid Google recommends a duration in excess of 27 years In addition information must be provided for at least one of the remaining fields for example your first and last name or organization name Figure 44 3 Once the information has been entered click on the Next button to proceed with the package creation Creating the Application APK File The next task to be performed is to instruct Eclipse to build the application APK package file in release mode and then sign it with the newly created private key At this point the Destination and key certificate checks screen should be displayed Using the Browse button navigate to a suitable folder into which the application APK file should be created Once a path and file name have been specified click on Finish to generate the APK and sign it with your private key During this process output similar to that outlined below will appear within the Console panel 2013 06 13 10 34 39 ReleaseTest New keystore C Users nas Documents AndroidReleaseAPK ReleaseTest apk has been created 2013 06 13 10 34 39 ReleaseTest Certificate fingerprints 2013 06 13 10 34 39 ReleaseTest MD5 FA 65 D9 F4 CA 17 DD 24 C2 16 FB D4 77 22 AB 46 2013 06 13 10 34 39 ReleaseTest SHA1 D1 E1 33 43 99 FF CF DF 65 71 AA EE 22 A7 DA CF E9 61 45 13 On completion of the generation process the keystore file and APK file will have been generated into the designated locations of the file system At this point the application is ready to be submitted to the Google Play store The private key generated as part of this process should be

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Signing_and_Preparing_an_Android_Application_for_Release (2016-02-13)
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  • Integrating Google Play In-app Billing into an Android Application – A Tutorial - Techotopia
    OK to return to the project import dialog Select the option to Copy projects into workspace Figure 53 4 before clicking on Finish to import the project Figure 53 4 Once the package has been imported locate it within the Project Explorer panel it will be named MainActivity and unfold the src folder to locate the Java files within the following package com example android trivialdrivesample util Select all nine Java files within this package and copy and paste them into the domainname inappbilling util package of our InAppBilling project Once imported the src folder of the package should appear as shown in Figure 53 5 Figure 53 5 Designing the User Interface The user interface as previously outlined is going to consist of two buttons the first of which can only be clicked after a purchase has been made via a click performed on the second button Double click on the res layout fragment in app billing xml file to load it into the Graphical Layout tool and design the user interface so that it resembles that of Figure 53 6 Figure 53 6 With the user interface layout designed switch to the XML view and name the buttons clickButton and buyButton respectively Also set onClick properties to configure the buttons to call methods named buttonClicked and buyClick such that the completed XML layout file reads as follows RelativeLayout xmlns android http schemas android com apk res android xmlns tools http schemas android com tools android layout width match parent android layout height match parent android paddingBottom dimen activity vertical margin android paddingLeft dimen activity horizontal margin android paddingRight dimen activity horizontal margin android paddingTop dimen activity vertical margin tools context InAppBillingActivity Button android id id buyButton android layout width wrap content android layout height wrap content android layout centerHorizontal true android layout centerVertical true android onClick buyClick android text string buy string Button android id id clickButton android layout width wrap content android layout height wrap content android layout above id buyButton android layout centerHorizontal true android layout marginBottom 56dp android onClick buttonClicked android text string clickme string RelativeLayout With the user interface design complete it is time to start writing some Java code to handle the purchasing and consumption of clicks Implementing the Click Me Button When the application is initially launched the Click Me button will be disabled To make sure that this happens load the InAppBillingActivity java file into the editing panel and override the onStart method to obtain a reference to the button and disable it package com ebookfrenzy inappbilling import android app Activity import android app ActionBar import android app Fragment import android os Bundle import android view LayoutInflater import android view Menu import android view MenuItem import android view View import android view ViewGroup import android os Build import android widget Button public class InAppBillingActivity extends Activity private Button clickButton private Button buyButton Override protected void onStart super onStart buyButton Button findViewById R id buyButton clickButton Button findViewById R id clickButton clickButton setEnabled false The buttonClicked method that will be called when the button is clicked by the user now also needs to be implemented All this method needs to do is to disable the button once again so that the button cannot be clicked again until another purchase is made and to enable the buy button so that another click can be purchased Remaining within the InAppBillingActivity java file implement this method as follows public class InAppBillingActivity extends Activity public void buttonClicked View view clickButton setEnabled false buyButton setEnabled true Work on the functionality of the first button is now complete The next steps are to begin implementing the in app billing functionality Google Play Developer Console and Google Wallet Accounts Each application developer making use of Google Play billing must be identified by a unique public license key The only way to obtain a public license key is to register an application within the Google Play Developer Console If you do not already have a Google Play Developer Console account go to http play google com apps publish and follow the steps to register as outlined in the chapter entitled Signing and Preparing an Android Application for Release Once you are logged in click on the Settings option represented by the cog icon on the left hand edge of the web page and on the Account details page scroll down to the Merchant Account section In order to use in app billing your Google Play Developer Console account must have a Google Wallet Merchant account associated with it If a Google Wallet merchant account is not set up create a merchant account and register it with your Google Developer Console account before proceeding Obtaining the Public License Key for the Application From the home page of the Google Play Developer Console click on the Add new application button specifying the default language and a title of InAppBilling Once this information has been entered click on the Upload APK button Figure 53 7 It is not necessary to upload the APK file at this point so once the application has been registered click on the Services APIs option to display the Base64 encoded RSA public key for the application as shown in Figure 53 8 Figure 53 8 Keep this Browser window open for now as this key will need to be included in the application code in the next step of this tutorial Setting Up Google Play Billing in the Application With the public key generated it is now time to use that key to initialize billing within the application code For the InAppBilling example project this will be performed in the onCreate method of the InAppBillingActivity java file and will make use of the IabHelper class from the utilities classes previously added to the project as follows Note that your license key here should be replaced by your own license key generated in the previous section and your domain represents the domain you selected for the project when it was created package com ebookfrenzy inappbilling import your domain inappbilling util IabHelper import your domain inappbilling util IabResult import your domain inappbilling util Inventory import your domain inappbilling util Purchase import android app Activity import android app ActionBar import android app Fragment import android os Bundle import android view LayoutInflater import android view Menu import android view MenuItem import android view View import android view ViewGroup import android os Build import android widget Button import android content Intent import android util Log public class InAppBillingActivity extends Activity private static final String TAG your domain inappbilling IabHelper mHelper private Button clickButton private Button buyButton Override protected void onStart super onStart buyButton Button findViewById R id buyButton clickButton Button findViewById R id clickButton clickButton setEnabled false String base64EncodedPublicKey your license key here mHelper new IabHelper this base64EncodedPublicKey mHelper startSetup new IabHelper OnIabSetupFinishedListener public void onIabSetupFinished IabResult result if result isSuccess Log d TAG In app Billing setup failed result else Log d TAG In app Billing is set up OK After implementing the above changes compile and run the application on a physical Android device Google Play Billing cannot be tested within an emulator session and make sure that the In app Billing is set up OK message appears in the LogCat output panel Initiating a Google Play In app Billing Purchase With access to the billing system initialized we can now turn our attention to initiating a purchase when the user touches the Buy Click button in the user interface This was previously configured to trigger a call to a method named buyClick which now needs to be implemented in the InAppBillingActivity java file In addition to initiating the purchase process in this method it will also be necessary to implement an onActivityResult method and also a listener method to be called when the purchase has completed Begin by editing the InAppBillingActivity java file and adding the code for the buyClick method so that it reads as follows public class InAppBillingActivity extends Activity private static final String TAG com example inappbilling IabHelper mHelper static final String ITEM SKU android test purchased public void buyClick View view mHelper launchPurchaseFlow this ITEM SKU 10001 mPurchaseFinishedListener mypurchasetoken Clearly all this method needs to do is make a call to the launchPurchaseFlow method of our mHelper instance The arguments passed through to the method are as follows A reference to the enclosing Activity instance from which the method is being called The SKU that identifies the product that is being purchased In this instance we are going to use a standard SKU provided by Google for testing purposes This SKU referred to as a static response SKU will always result in a successful purchase Other testing SKUs available for use when testing purchasing functionality without making real purchases are android test cancelled android test refunded and android test item unavailable The request code which can be any positive integer value When the purchase has completed the onActivityResult method will be called and passed this integer along with the purchase response This allows the method to identify which purchase process is returning and can be useful when the method needs to be able to handle purchasing for different items The listener method to be called when the purchase is complete The developer payload token string This can be any string value and is used to identify the purchase For the purposes of this example this is set to mypurchasetoken Implementing the onActivityResult Method When the purchasing process returns it will call a method on the calling activity named onActivityResult passing through as arguments the request code passed through to the launchPurchaseFlow method a result code and intent data containing the purchase response This method needs to identify if it was called as a result of an in app purchase request or some request unrelated to in app billing It does this by calling the handleActivityResult method of the mHelper instance and passing through the incoming arguments If this is a purchase request the mHelper will handle it and return a true value If this is not the result of a purchase then the method needs to pass it up to the superclass to be handled Bringing this together results in the following code Override protected void onActivityResult int requestCode int resultCode Intent data if mHelper handleActivityResult requestCode resultCode data super onActivityResult requestCode resultCode data In the event that the onActivityResult method was called in response to an in app billing purchase a call will then be made to the listener method referenced in the call to the launchPurchaseFlow method in this case a method named mPurchaseFinishedListener The next task therefore is to implement this method Implementing the Purchase Finished Listener The purchase finished listener must perform a number of different tasks In the first instance it must check to ensure that the purchase was successful It then needs to check the SKU of the purchased item to make sure it matches the one specified in the purchase request In the event of a successful purchase the method will need to consume the purchase so that the user can purchase it again when another one is needed If the purchase is not consumed future attempts to purchase the item will fail stating that the item has already been purchased Whilst this would be desired behavior if the user only needed to purchase the item once clearly this is not the behavior required for consumable purchases Finally the method needs to enable the Click Me button so that the user can perform the button click that was purchased Within the InAppBillingActivity java file implement this method as follows IabHelper OnIabPurchaseFinishedListener mPurchaseFinishedListener new IabHelper OnIabPurchaseFinishedListener public void onIabPurchaseFinished IabResult result Purchase purchase if result isFailure Handle error return else if purchase getSku equals ITEM SKU consumeItem buyButton setEnabled false As can be seen from the above code fragment in the event that the purchase was successful a method named consumeItem will be called Clearly the next step is to implement this method Consuming the Purchased Item In the documentation for Google Play In app Billing Google recommends that consumable items be consumed before providing the user with access to the purchased item So far in this tutorial we have performed the purchase of the item but not yet consumed it In the event of a successful purchase the mPurchaseFinishedListener implementation has been configured to call a method name consumeItem It will be the responsibility of this method to query the billing system to make sure that the purchase has been made This involves making a call to the queryInventoryAsync method of the mHelper object This task is performed asynchronously from the application s main thread and a listener method called when the task is complete If the item has been purchased the listener will consume the item via a call to the consumeAsync method of the mHelper object Bringing these requirements together results in the following additions to the InAppBillingActivity java file public void consumeItem mHelper queryInventoryAsync mReceivedInventoryListener IabHelper QueryInventoryFinishedListener mReceivedInventoryListener new IabHelper QueryInventoryFinishedListener public void onQueryInventoryFinished IabResult result Inventory inventory if result isFailure Handle failure else mHelper consumeAsync inventory getPurchase ITEM SKU mConsumeFinishedListener As with the query the consumption task is also performed asynchronously and in this case is configured to call a listener named mConsumeFinishedListener when completed This listener now needs to be implemented such that it enables the Click Me button after the item has been consumed in the billing system IabHelper OnConsumeFinishedListener mConsumeFinishedListener new IabHelper OnConsumeFinishedListener public void onConsumeFinished Purchase purchase IabResult result if result isSuccess clickButton setEnabled true else handle error Releasing the IabHelper Instance Throughout this tutorial much of the work has been performed by calling methods on an instance of the IabHelper utility class named mHelper Now that the code to handle purchasing and subsequent consumption of a virtual item is complete the last task is to make sure this object is released when the activity is destroyed Remaining in the InAppBillingActivity java file override the onDestroy activity lifecycle method as follows Override public void onDestroy super onDestroy if mHelper null mHelper dispose mHelper null Modifying the Security java File When an application is compiled and installed on a device from within Eclipse it is built and executed in debug mode When the application is complete it is then built in release mode and uploaded to the Google Play App Store as described in the chapter entitled Signing and Preparing an Android Application for Release As the InAppBilling application is currently configured purchases are being made using the android test purchased static response SKU code It is important to be aware that static response SKUs can only be used when running an application in debug mode As will be outlined later new in app products must be created within the Google Play developer console before full testing can be performed in release mode The current version of the utility classes provided with the TrivialDrive example application include an added level of security that prevents purchases from being made without a valid signature key being returned from the Google Play billing server A side effect of this change is that it prevents the code from functioning when using the static response SKU values Before testing the application in debug mode therefore a few extra lines of code need to be added to the verifyPurchase method in the Security java file Within the Eclipse Project Explorer panel select the Security java file located in the src package name inappbilling util folder of the project to load it into the editing panel Once loaded locate and modify the verifyPurchase method so that it reads as follows package com ebookfrenzy inappbilling util import android text TextUtils import android util Log import org json JSONException import org json JSONObject import your domain inappbilling BuildConfig import java security InvalidKeyException import java security KeyFactory import java security NoSuchAlgorithmException import java security PublicKey import java security Signature import java security SignatureException import java security spec InvalidKeySpecException import java security spec X509EncodedKeySpec public static boolean verifyPurchase String base64PublicKey String signedData String signature if TextUtils isEmpty signedData TextUtils isEmpty base64PublicKey TextUtils isEmpty signature Log e TAG Purchase verification failed missing data if BuildConfig DEBUG return true return false PublicKey key Security generatePublicKey base64PublicKey return Security verify key signedData signature This will ensure that when the application is running in debug mode the method does not report an error if the signature is missing when a static response SKU purchase is verified By checking for debug mode in this code we ensure that this security check will function as intended when the application is built in release mode Testing the In app Billing Application Compile and run the application on a physical Android device with Google Play support and click on the Buy a Click button This should cause the Google Play purchase dialog to appear listing the test item as illustrated in Figure 53 9 Figure 53 9 Click on the Buy button to simulate a purchase at which point a Payment Successful message Figure 53 10 should appear after which it should be possible to click on the Click Me button once Figure 53 10 Having consumed the click it will be necessary to purchase another click in order to once again enable the button Building a Release APK Up until this point the example application created in this chapter has used a static response testing SKU provided by Google for early stage testing of in app billing The next step is to create a real in app billing product SKU code for a virtual item and use this when testing the application Before creating an in app billing product however the application code needs to be changed slightly so that it uses a real SKU instead of the static response SKU The product SKU that will be used in the remainder of this chapter will be named com example buttonclick so edit the InAppBillingActivity java file and modify the SKU

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Integrating_Google_Play_In-app_Billing_into_an_Android_Application_%E2%80%93_A_Tutorial (2016-02-13)
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  • Android 4 App Development Essentials - Techotopia
    the Detail Pane Modifying the WebsiteDetailFragment Class Adding Manifest Permissions Creating and Managing Overflow Menus on Android The Overflow Menu Creating a Overflow Menu Displaying an Overflow Menu Responding to Menu Item Selections Creating Checkable Item Groups Creating the Example Project Modifying the Menu Description Implementing the onOptionsItemSelected Method Testing the Application Animating User Interfaces with the Android Transitions Framework Introducing Android Transitions and Scenes Using Interpolators with Transitions Working with Scene Transitions Custom Transitions and TransitionSets in Code Custom Transitions and TransitionSets in XML Working with Interpolators Creating a Custom Interpolator Using the beginDelayedTransition Method An Android Transition Tutorial using beginDelayedTransition Creating the TransitionDemo Project Preparing the Project Files Implementing beginDelayedTransition Animation Customizing the Transition Implementing Android Scene Transitions A Tutorial An Overview of the Scene Transition Project Creating the SceneTransitions Project Identifying and Preparing the Root Container Designing the First Scene Designing the Second Scene Entering the First Scene Loading Scene 2 Implementing the Transitions Adding the Transition File Loading and Using the Transition Set Configuring Additional Transitions An Overview of Android Intents An Overview of Intents Explicit Intents Returning Data from an Activity Implicit Intents Using Intent Filters Checking Intent Availability Android Explicit Intents A Worked Example Creating the Explicit Intent Example Application Designing the User Interface Layout for ActivityA Creating the Second Activity Class Creating the User Interface for ActivityB Adding ActivityB to the Application Manifest File Creating the Intent Extracting Intent Data Launching ActivityB as a Sub Activity Returning Data from a Sub Activity Testing the Application Android Implicit Intents A Worked Example Creating the Implicit Intent Example Project Designing the User Interface Creating the Implicit Intent Adding a Second Matching Activity Adding the Web View to the UI Obtaining the Intent URL Modifying the MyWebView Project Manifest File Installing the MyWebView Package on a Device Testing the Application Android Broadcast Intents and Broadcast Receivers An Overview of Broadcast Intents An Overview of Broadcast Receivers Obtaining Results from a Broadcast Sticky Broadcast Intents The Broadcast Intent Example Creating the Example Application Creating and Sending the Broadcast Intent Creating the Broadcast Receiver Configuring a Broadcast Receiver in the Manifest File Testing the Broadcast Example Listening for System Broadcasts A Basic Overview of Android Threads and Thread handlers An Overview of Threads The Application Main Thread Thread Handlers A Basic Threading Example Creating a New Thread Implementing a Thread Handler Passing a Message to the Handler An Overview of Android Started and Bound Services Started Services Intent Service Bound Service The Anatomy of a Service Controlling Destroyed Service Restart Options Declaring a Service in the Manifest File Starting a Service Running on System Startup Implementing an Android Started Service A Worked Example Creating the Example Project Creating the Service Class Adding the Service to the Manifest File Starting the Service Testing the IntentService Example Using the Service Class Creating the New Service Modifying the User Interface Running the Application Creating a New Thread for Service Tasks Android Local Bound Services A Worked Example Understanding Bound Services Bound

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php?title=Android_4_App_Development_Essentials&oldid=21902 (2016-02-13)
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  • Pages that link to "Android 4 App Development Essentials" - Techotopia
    An Overview and Example of Android Event Handling links Android Touch and Multi touch Event Handling links An Overview of Android Intents links Android Explicit Intents A Worked Example links Android Implicit Intents A Worked Example links Android Broadcast Intents and Broadcast Receivers links An Overview of Android Started and Bound Services links A Basic Overview of Android Threads and Thread handlers links Implementing an Android Started Service A Worked Example links Android Local Bound Services A Worked Example links Android Remote Bound Services A Worked Example links Detecting Common Gestures using the Android Gesture Detector Class links Implementing Android Custom Gesture and Pinch Recognition links An Introduction to Android Fragments links Using Fragments in Android A Worked Example links An Overview of Android SQLite Databases links An Android TableLayout and TableRow Tutorial links An Android SQLite Database Tutorial links Understanding Android Content Providers links Implementing Video Playback on Android using the VideoView and MediaController Classes links File Android app development essentials png redirect page links Using the Android GridLayout Manager in the Graphical Layout Tool links Working with the Android GridLayout in XML Layout Resources links An Android Master Detail Flow Tutorial links Introduction to Android 4 4 App

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Special:WhatLinksHere/Android_4_App_Development_Essentials (2016-02-13)
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  • Android 4 App Development Essentials - Techotopia
    Item Selections Creating Checkable Item Groups Creating the Example Project Modifying the Menu Description Implementing the onOptionsItemSelected Method Testing the Application Animating User Interfaces with the Android Transitions Framework Introducing Android Transitions and Scenes Using Interpolators with Transitions Working with Scene Transitions Custom Transitions and TransitionSets in Code Custom Transitions and TransitionSets in XML Working with Interpolators Creating a Custom Interpolator Using the beginDelayedTransition Method An Android Transition Tutorial using beginDelayedTransition Creating the TransitionDemo Project Preparing the Project Files Implementing beginDelayedTransition Animation Customizing the Transition Implementing Android Scene Transitions A Tutorial An Overview of the Scene Transition Project Creating the SceneTransitions Project Identifying and Preparing the Root Container Designing the First Scene Designing the Second Scene Entering the First Scene Loading Scene 2 Implementing the Transitions Adding the Transition File Loading and Using the Transition Set Configuring Additional Transitions An Overview of Android Intents An Overview of Intents Explicit Intents Returning Data from an Activity Implicit Intents Using Intent Filters Checking Intent Availability Android Explicit Intents A Worked Example Creating the Explicit Intent Example Application Designing the User Interface Layout for ActivityA Creating the Second Activity Class Creating the User Interface for ActivityB Adding ActivityB to the Application Manifest File Creating the Intent Extracting Intent Data Launching ActivityB as a Sub Activity Returning Data from a Sub Activity Testing the Application Android Implicit Intents A Worked Example Creating the Implicit Intent Example Project Designing the User Interface Creating the Implicit Intent Adding a Second Matching Activity Adding the Web View to the UI Obtaining the Intent URL Modifying the MyWebView Project Manifest File Installing the MyWebView Package on a Device Testing the Application Android Broadcast Intents and Broadcast Receivers An Overview of Broadcast Intents An Overview of Broadcast Receivers Obtaining Results from a Broadcast Sticky Broadcast Intents The Broadcast Intent Example Creating the Example Application Creating and Sending the Broadcast Intent Creating the Broadcast Receiver Configuring a Broadcast Receiver in the Manifest File Testing the Broadcast Example Listening for System Broadcasts A Basic Overview of Android Threads and Thread handlers An Overview of Threads The Application Main Thread Thread Handlers A Basic Threading Example Creating a New Thread Implementing a Thread Handler Passing a Message to the Handler An Overview of Android Started and Bound Services Started Services Intent Service Bound Service The Anatomy of a Service Controlling Destroyed Service Restart Options Declaring a Service in the Manifest File Starting a Service Running on System Startup Implementing an Android Started Service A Worked Example Creating the Example Project Creating the Service Class Adding the Service to the Manifest File Starting the Service Testing the IntentService Example Using the Service Class Creating the New Service Modifying the User Interface Running the Application Creating a New Thread for Service Tasks Android Local Bound Services A Worked Example Understanding Bound Services Bound Service Interaction Options A Local Bound Service Example Adding a Bound Service to the Project Implementing the Binder Binding the Client to the Service Completing the Example Testing the Application Android

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php?title=Android_4_App_Development_Essentials&printable=yes (2016-02-13)
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  • An Overview and History of the Kindle Fire - Techotopia
    iTunes and iBooks stores the iPad clearly posed a serious threat to Amazon s dominance in digital goods entertainment and services Recognizing the tablet computer as a key gateway to controlling access to digital content Lab126 began work on a project codenamed Otter The results of the Otter project were made public on September 28 2011 when Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos walked onto a stage in New York and announced the device that we now know as the Kindle Fire Kindle Fire Hardware The Kindle Fire is 7 5 high 4 7 wide and 0 45 thick and weighs in at 14 6 ounces It has a 7 multi touch display with a 1024 x 600 pixel resolution capable of displaying 16 million colors at 169 pixels per inch ppi In both portrait and landscape orientations a 20 pixel high menu bar is displayed thereby reducing available resolution for use by applications to 1004 x 600 in portrait mode and 580 x 1024 in landscape The Kindle Fire has 8GB of internal storage Approximately 2GB of this memory is reserved for the operating system with the remainder available for applications and local digital content storage In terms of the processor the first Kindle Fire model is powered by the Texas Instruments OMAP 4430 a 1GHz dual core processor which is based on the ARM Cortex A9 MPCore design This processor also includes an integrated POWERVR SGX540 2D and 3D graphics accelerator Connectivity is provided via Wi Fi with support 802 11b 802 11g and 802 11n standards The only physical ports on the device are a USB connector for battery charging and a 3 5mm audio jack Audio is also available via a set of speakers built into the device Finally the Kindle Fire also includes an accelerometer and a light sensor Kindle Fire Operating System The operating system running on the Kindle Fire is based on Google s Android 2 3 Gingerbread mobile operating system Though originally intended for use on smartphone devices and superseded by more recent Android releases designed specifically for tablets Amazon has heavily customized this older version of Android to meet the specific needs of the Kindle Fire user 1 4 Kindle Fire the Cloud and Pricing By just about any measure the technical specifications of the Kindle Fire are unremarkable When compared to the iPad for example the absence of front and rear facing cameras GPS gyroscope Bluetooth 3G connectivity and greater amounts of memory might appear to make the Kindle Fire appear to be uncompetitive Whilst it is almost certain that other Kindle Fire models will be introduced that have many of these features it should be noted that this first Kindle Fire model is priced extremely aggressively 199 in the United States In fact it is estimated by industry analysts that Amazon has priced the device so aggressively that it actually loses money on each sale The goal of course is to reach a mass market of customers and generate

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/An_Overview_and_History_of_the_Kindle_Fire (2016-02-13)
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  • Introduction to Kindle Fire App Development Essentials - Techotopia
    of the steps necessary to set up an Android development environment An introduction to the architecture of Android is followed by an in depth look at the design of Android applications and user interfaces More advanced topics such as database management content providers and intents are also covered as are touch screen handling gesture recognition camera access and the playback and recording of both video and audio In addition to covering general Android development techniques the book also includes Amazon and Kindle Fire specific topics such as creating Kindle Fire emulators for application testing connecting Kindle Fire devices to the debugging environment using the Amazon In App Purchasing and Mobile Ads APIs implementing maps using the Amazon Maps API and submitting apps to the Amazon Mobile App Distribution portal Assuming you already have some Java programming experience are ready to download Eclipse and the Android SDK have access to a Windows Mac or Linux system and ideas for some apps to develop you are ready to get started Downloading the Code Samples The source code and Eclipse project files for the examples contained in this book are available for download at http www ebookfrenzy com code kindlefire zip Once the file has been downloaded and unzipped the samples may be imported into an existing Eclipse workspace by selecting the Eclipse File Import menu option and choosing the Android Existing Android Code Into Workspace category When prompted select the folder containing the sample project folders as the Root Directory before choosing the sample projects to be imported from the resulting list Feedback We want you to be satisfied with your purchase of this book If you find any errors in the book or have any comments questions or concerns please contact us at email protected Errata Whilst we make every effort

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Introduction_to_Kindle_Fire_App_Development_Essentials (2016-02-13)
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  • An Overview of the Kindle Fire - Techotopia
    CEO Jeff Bezos walked onto a stage in New York and announced the device that we now know as the Kindle Fire Kindle Fire Operating System The operating system running on the first generation Kindle Fire was and still is based on Google s Android 2 3 Gingerbread mobile operating system Though originally intended for use on smartphone devices and superseded by more recent Android releases designed specifically for tablets Amazon has heavily customized this older version of Android to meet the specific needs of the Kindle Fire user The subsequent second generation Kindle Fire and more recent Kindle Fire HD models run an operating system that is currently based on Android 4 0 3 Kindle Fire the Cloud and Pricing By just about any measure the technical specifications of the first Kindle Fire were unremarkable When compared to the iPad for example the absence of front and rear facing cameras GPS gyroscope Bluetooth 3G connectivity and greater amounts of memory appeared to make the Kindle Fire seem uncompetitive It should be noted however that this first Kindle Fire model was priced extremely aggressively 199 in the United States The feature gap between the Kindle Fire and the iPad has subsequently closed with the introduction of the Kindle HD 7 and HD 8 9 models Pricing on the other hand has remained extremely competitive In fact it is estimated by industry analysts that Amazon has priced the devices so aggressively that the company actually loses money on each sale The goal of course is to reach a mass market of customers and generate revenue far in excess of that lost on the device by selling digital content from Amazon com In addition to the on board storage all digital content purchased through Amazon can be stored free of charge on

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/An_Overview_of_the_Kindle_Fire (2016-02-13)
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