archive-com.com » COM » T » TECHOTOPIA.COM

Total: 1018

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Windows Server 2008 Essentials - Techotopia
    Partition from the Command Line Creating and Managing Simple and Spanned Volumes on Windows Server 2008 An Overview of Dynamic Disks Converting Basic Disks to Dynamic Disks with Disk Management Converting Basic Disks to Dynamic Disks from the Command Line Creating a New Spanned Volume using Disk Management Creating a New Spanned Volume from the Command Prompt Creating and Managing Windows Server 2008 Striped RAID 0 Volumes An Overview of Striped RAID 0 Volumes Creating a Striped RAID 0 Volume using Disk Management Creating a Striped RAID 0 Volume from the Command Prompt Recovering a Striped Volume Creating and Managing Windows Server 2008 Mirrored RAID 1 Volumes An Overview of Disk Mirroring RAID 1 Creating a Mirrored RAID 1 Set using Disk Management Creating a Mirrored RAID 1 Volume from the Command Prompt Adding a Mirror to an Existing Volume Breaking and Removing Mirrored Sets Recovering a Mirrored Set Mirroring Windows Server 2008 GBT and MBR Boot and System Disks An Overview of GPT and MBR Partition Styles Mirroring Boot and System Volumes on an MBR Disk using Disk Management Mirroring Boot and System Volumes on an MBR Disk from the Command Prompt Mirroring Boot and System Volumes on a GPT Disk Configuring and Managing RAID 5 on Windows Server 2008 An Overview of RAID 5 Configuring RAID 5 Using Windows Server 2008 Disk Management Configuring RAID 5 from the Command Prompt using DiskPart Fixing RAID 5 Problems Windows Server 2008 Terminal Services Installing Terminal Services Adding Users to the Remote Desktop Users Group Accessing Terminal Services from the Client Remote Desktop Client Configuration Options Logging out from a Remote Desktop Session Running Multiple Remote Desktops Installing Applications for Windows Server 2008 Terminal Services Understanding Terminal Services Operating Modes Installing Terminal Server Applications using Control Panel Terminal Server Application Compatibility Scripts Configuring RemoteApps on Windows Server 2008 Preparing the Server for RemoteApps What are RemoteApps Configuring a Application as a RemoteApp Making RemoteApps Available to Users via TS Web Access Making RemoteApps Available to Users via Windows Installer Packages Making RemoteApps Available to Users via RDP Files Configuring Windows Server 2008 TS Web Access Installing TS Web Access Role Service Accessing the TS Web Access Page Configuring RemoteApps for TS Web Access Deploying a Windows Server 2008 Terminal Server Farm using TS Session Broker An Overview of the Terminal Services Session Broker Prerequisites for Implementing TS Session Broker Installing the Terminal Services Session Broker Adding Terminal Servers to the TS Session Broker Joining Terminal Servers to a TS Session Broker Configuring a Windows Server 2008 Terminal Services License Server Installing the Terminal Services License Server Activating the TS License Server Installing Client Access Licenses CAL Managing Windows Server 2008 Disk Quotas An Overview of Disk Quotas Configuring Disk Quotas Configuring Disk Quotas for Individual Users Querying Quotas from the Command Prompt Repairing and Defragmenting Windows Server 2008 Disks Using Check Disk to Scan For and Fix File System Errors Running Check Disk from the Command prompt Defragmenting Disks with Disk

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php?title=Windows_Server_2008_Essentials&printable=yes (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Information for "Windows Server 2008 Essentials" - Techotopia
    Page ID 819 Page content language English en Page content model wikitext Indexing by robots Allowed Number of redirects to this page 1 Counted as a content page Yes Page protection Edit Allow all users infinite Move Allow all users infinite Edit history Page creator Neil Talk contribs Date of page creation 15 37 27 June 2008 Latest editor Neil Talk contribs Date of latest edit 21 18 1 February

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php?title=Windows_Server_2008_Essentials&action=info (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Installing Windows PowerShell 1.0 - Techotopia
    is invoked by selecting the Start Server Manager menu option Once Server Manager is running select Features from the left hand pane and in the Features Summary section of the main panel click on Add Features to invoke the Add Features Wizard The first screen displayed will list all available features in alphabetical order Scroll down the list and select the checkbox next to Windows PowerShell and click Next to proceed to the installation screen Clicking Install will initiate the installation process After a few minutes the installation will complete and the wizard may be closed using the Close button To launch Windows PowerShell select Start All Programs Windows PowerShell 1 0 Windows PowerShell Once loaded a new window will appear displaying the Windows PowerShell PS prompt at which commands may be entered Performing a Windows Server 2008 PowerShell Command Line Installation The installation of PowerShell on a Windows Server 2008 may be performed from the command prompt using the servermanagercmd command To achieve this invoke the command prompt with elevated privileges right click on the Command Prompt entry in the Start menu and select Run as administrator and execute servermanagercmd install powershell as follows C Users Administrator servermanagercmd install powershell Start Installation Installation Succeeded Windows PowerShell 100 100 Success Installation succeeded Once installed PowerShell may be run from the command prompt simply by entering powershell Installing PowerShell on Windows Server 2003 XP and Vista Systems Unlike Windows Server 2008 other Windows versions do not ship with PowerShell 1 0 bundled as a feature As such it is necessary to download and install PowerShell from the Microsoft Download Center Pre requisites for installing PowerShell 1 0 are as follows Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1 SP1 or later Windows XP Service Pack 2 SP2 or later Net Framework 2 0

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Installing_Windows_PowerShell_1.0 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Basics of the Windows PowerShell 1.0 Interactive Shell - Techotopia
    may be changed using cd command for example PS C Users Administrator cd windows PS C Windows PowerShell Command Line Editing Keys PowerShell provides a number of special key sequences that speed the task of creating and editing commands in the interactive shell each of which is outlined in the following table Key Sequence Description Left Arrow Moves the command line cursor one character to the left Right Arrow Moves the command line cursor one character to the right Ctrl Left Arrow Moves the command line cursor one word to the left Ctrl Right Arrow Moves the command line cursor one word to the right Delete Deletes the character in the command line at the current cursor position Backspace Deletes the character immediately to the right of the current cursor position Insert Toggles between character insert and overwrite modes Home Relocates the cursor to the beginning of the command line End Relocates the cursor to the end of the command line Tab Performs command completion operation whereby the shell attempts to guess at the remainder of the command being entered F7 Displays a new window containing the command history from which previous commands may be selected PowerShell Command Completion After a few characters of a command parameter file name variable or variable property have been entered at the PowerShell command line prompt the Tab key may be pressed to instruct PowerShell to complete the remainder of the entry For example if the first few characters of a command have been entered PowerShell will try to find the best match for a command and fill in the remainder of the command name If the command selected by PowerShell is not the correct one pressing the Tab key repeatedly will cycle through all the possible matches until the correct one is displayed Similarly if a partial file name is entered followed by the Tab key PowerShell will populate the command line with file name from the current directory If once again the first match displayed by PowerShell is not the desired file the Tab key can be pressed repeatedly until the correct match is displayed Tab completion is particularly useful for finding the properties and methods of a variable As an example suppose a variable named mynumber is assigned a numerical value and we want to find out what the type of that value is We assume there must be a method we can call on the variable to get the type but do not know what that method is called To cycle through the available methods we simply enter the name of the variable followed by a character and then the first few characters of the method we are assuming it will begin with Get We then press the Tab key until we find the method that does what we need in this case GetType PS C Users Administrator mynum GetType We then enter the closing parentheses since we do not need to pass any arguments through to the method and

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/The_Basics_of_the_Windows_PowerShell_1.0_Interactive_Shell (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Basics of Creating and Running Windows PowerShell 1.0 Scripts - Techotopia
    enter the following command hello ps1 The reason for the prefix is to tell Windows PowerShell that the script to be executed is in the current directory By default Windows PowerShell will not execute a script in the current directory unless it is prefixed with This is for security reasons and is intended to ensure that the user really wants to run the command from the current directory as opposed another command with the same name located elsewhere or built in to PowerShell By default it is likely that an error will be displayed similar to the following PS C Users Administrator hello ps1 File C Users Administrator t ps1 cannot be loaded because the execution of scripts is disabled on this system Please see get help about signing for more details At line 1 char 7 t ps1 This is another security measure which prevents the execution of PowerShell scripts by default primarily to stop malicious scripts being executed without the user s knowledge To enable script execution the following command must first be issued PS C Users Administrator set executionpolicy remotesigned Having configured with execution policy the script may now be executed PS C Users Administrator hello ps1 Please enter your name Neil Hello Neil To launch the script from the command prompt without entering PowerShell s interactive mode simply pass the script to the powershell command at the command prompt using the command option C Users Administrator powershell command hello ps1 Please enter your name Neil Hello Neil Handling Script Arguments In the above example the user was prompted for their name Often it necessary to pass one or more arguments to a script at the point that it is executed This is handled via a special variable called args which is populated with any arguments which

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/The_Basics_of_Creating_and_Running_Windows_PowerShell_1.0_Scripts (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Windows PowerShell 1.0 Commands and Aliases - Techotopia
    Cmdlet Set the value of a property at the specified location Get Acl Cmdlet Get the security descriptor for a resource such as a file or registry key Set Acl Cmdlet Change the security descriptor of a specified resource such as a file or a registry key Get PfxCertificate Cmdlet Get information about pfx certificate files on the computer Get Credential Cmdlet Get a credential object based on a user name and password Get ExecutionPolicy Cmdlet Get the current execution policy for the shell Set ExecutionPolicy Cmdlet Change the user preference for the execution policy of the shell Get AuthenticodeSignature Cmdlet Get information about the Authenticode signature in a file Set AuthenticodeSignature Cmdlet Use an authenticode signature to sign a Windows PowerShell script or other file ConvertFrom SecureString Cmdlet Convert a secure string into an encrypted standard string ConvertTo SecureString Cmdlet Convert encrypted standard strings to secure strings It can also convert plain text to secure strings It is used with ConvertFrom SecureString and Read Host Format List Cmdlet Format the output as a list of properties in which each property appears on a new line Format Custom Cmdlet Use a customized view to format the output Format Table Cmdlet Format the output as a table Format Wide Cmdlet Format objects as a wide table that displays only one property of each object Out Null Cmdlet Delete output instead of sending it to the console Out Default Cmdlet Send the output to the default formatter and the default output cmdlet Has no effect on the formatting or output and is provided as a placeholder that lets you write your own Out Default function or cmdlet Out Host Cmdlet Send output to the command line Out File Cmdlet Send output to a file Out Printer Cmdlet Send output to a printer Out String Cmdlet Send objects to the host as a series of strings Add Member Cmdlet Add a user defined custom member to an instance of a Windows PowerShell object Compare Object Cmdlet Compare two sets of objects ConvertTo Html Cmdlet Create an HTML page that represents an object or a set of objects Export Csv Cmdlet Create a comma separated values CSV file that represents the input objects Import Csv Cmdlet Imports comma separated value CSV files in the format produced by the Export CSV cmdlet and returns objects that correspond to the objects represented in that CSV file Export Alias Cmdlet Export information about currently defined aliases to a file Invoke Expression Cmdlet Run a Windows PowerShell expression that is provided in the form of a string Get Alias Cmdlet Get the aliases for the current session Get Culture Cmdlet Get information about the regional settings on a computer Get Date Cmdlet Get the current date and time Get Host Cmdlet Get a reference to the current console host object Display Windows Powershell version and regional information by default Get Member Cmdlet Get information about objects or collections of objects Get UICulture Cmdlet Get information about the current

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Windows_PowerShell_1.0_Commands_and_Aliases (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Windows PowerShell 1.0 String Quoting and Escape Sequences - Techotopia
    involves the display of a string which contains double quotes Clearly PowerShell will have difficulty identifying where the string begins and ends PS C Users Administrator write output inputobject My favorite color is blue Write Output A parameter cannot be found that matches parameter name blue At line 1 char 13 write output inputobject My favorite color is blue Both these problems may be alleviated either by using single quotes or by escaping both of which are covered in the following sections Using Single Quotes Single quotes work in much the same way as double quotes with one notable difference that variable names are not expanded and the embedding of double quotes in the encapsulated string is allowed For example the mycolor variable is no longer expanded to be red PS C Users Administrator mycolor red PS C Users Administrator write output inputobject My favorite color is mycolor My favorite color is mycolor Similarly the double quotes in the string are displayed literally PS C Users Administrator write output inputobject My favorite color is blue My favorite color is blue In fact anything placed inside single quotes is taken literally with the expection of other single quotes which cause a problem similar to the use of double quotes in a double quoted string For example PS C Users Administrator write output inputobject My favorite color is blue Write Output A parameter cannot be found that matches parameter name blue At line 1 char 13 write output inputobject My favorite color is blue In fact if single quotes are to be displayed in a string double quotes must be used to encapsulate the string PS C Users Administrator write output inputobject My favorite color is blue My favorite color is blue This raises the issue of how to handle a string which contains both single and double quotes The answer to this problem lies in the use of the escape character Using the PowerShell Escape Character The PowerShell escape character takes the form of a back quote and instructs PowerShell to treat the following character literally as opposed to interpreting it in some other way Those familiar with other shells and programming languages will be more familiar with using the back slash character for escaping The reason for the use of the back quote instead of the backslash is the direct result of the decision in the first version of DOS to use the backslash character to separate the different parts of a file path for example C Windows Program Files Other than this difference the concept of escaping is otherwise the same To understand the escape character consider the first example in this chapter whereby PowerShell interpreted the second word after the inputobject paramater as an additional argument PS C Users Administrator write output inputobject hello everyone Write Output A parameter cannot be found that matches parameter name everyone At line 1 char 13 write output inputobject hello everyone The reason this occurred was because the space character was interpreted

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Windows_PowerShell_1.0_String_Quoting_and_Escape_Sequences (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Directing and Formatting Windows PowerShell 1.0 Output - Techotopia
    the following command reads a line of input from the user and subsequently writes it to a file called mydata txt located in the current directory using ASCII encoding PS C Users Administrator read host out file encoding ASCII mydata txt The Out Null Cmdlet The purpose of the Out Null cmdlet is quite simply to discard output For those familiar with UNIX or Linux systems this is analogous to directing output to dev null This cmdlet can be useful for example when it is necessary to hide unwanted output from the user when a script is executing The Out String Cmdlet By default the Out String cmdlet concatenates all the lines of output from the preceding command in the pipe into a single raw string in other words not as a string object and passes it to the next cmdlet If the lines of output are to be packaged as separate strings the command should be used with the stream parameter Whilst of little use within the context of the PowerShell environment this cmdlet is provided in order to facilitate interaction with external entities which can only handle raw strings and would not be able to deal with a Net string if one was sent its way Formatting PowerShell Output So far in this chapter we have explored techniques to direct output generated from Windows PowerShell scripts but have left PowerShell to decide how to format the output based on the data s type In practice however it is unlikely that the default format will always be the desired format Consequently PowerShell provides a number of formatting cmdlets through which output may be piped using the character to change the way the information is presented to the user The first of these format cmdlets is the format table command also available via the ft alias This cmdlet displays the output data as a series of columns This is actually the default format option for output from the get childitem command which displays the contents of a directory For example PS C Users Administrator get childitem ft Directory Microsoft PowerShell Core FileSystem C Users Administrator Mode LastWriteTime Length Name d r 11 7 2008 4 26 PM Contacts d r 11 7 2008 4 26 PM Desktop d r 11 7 2008 4 26 PM Documents d r 11 7 2008 4 26 PM Downloads By default format table takes a best guess approach to deciding how wide the table fields should be Unfortunately what may be the correct width for the first few rows of data may prove to be insufficient for later rows An alternative is to use the autosize switch parameter which will process all the lines of data to find the optimal field widths before the data is displayed The downside to this approach is that for large volumes of data there may be a significant delay before the information is displayed Another formatting option is provided by the format list aliased as fl cmdlet This

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Directing_and_Formatting_Windows_PowerShell_1.0_Output (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive



  •