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  • Managing KVM on RHEL 6 using the virsh Command-line Tool - Techotopia
    Welcome to virsh the virtualization interactive terminal Type help for help with commands quit to quit virsh list Id Name State 2 Windows7 running 3 myWin7 running virsh start MyNewVM Domain MyNewVM started virsh list Id Name State 2 Windows7 running 3 myWin7 running 4 MyNewVM running virsh The virsh tool supports a wide range of commands a full listing of which may be obtained using the help option virsh help Additional details on the syntax for each command may be obtained by specifying the command after the help directive virsh help restore NAME restore restore a domain from a saved state in a file SYNOPSIS restore file DESCRIPTION Restore a domain OPTIONS file string the state to restore In the remainder of this chapter we will look at some of these commands in more detail Listing Guest System Status The status of the guest systems on an RHEL 6 virtualization host may be viewed at any time using the list option of the virsh tool For example su virsh list The above command will display output containing a line for each guest similar to the following Id Name State 2 Windows7 running 3 myWin7 running Starting a Guest System A guest operating system can be started using the virsh tool combined with the start option followed by the name of the guest operating system to be launched For example virsh start myGuestOS Connecting to a Running Guest System Once the guest operating system has started a connection to the guest may be established using either the vncviewer tool or the virt manager console To use virt manager select Applications System Tools Virtual Machine Manager select the desired system and click Open To connect using vncviewer to the default virtual machine enter the following command in Terminal window vncviewer When prompted for a server enter localhost 5900 A VNC window will subsequently appear containing the running guest system If you have multiple virtual machines running the VNC port of the virtual machine may be identified using the virsh command virsh vncdisplay WindowsVM 4 In order to connect to the console for the WindowsVM therefore the following command could be used vncviewer 4 Shutting Down a Guest System The shutdown option of the xm tool is used to shutdown a guest operating system virsh shutdown guestName where guestName is the name of the guest system to be shutdown Note that the shutdown option allows the guest operating system to perform an orderly shutdown when it receives the shutdown instruction To instantly stop a guest operating system the destroy option may be used with all the attendant risks of filesystem damage and data loss virsh destroy myGuestOS Suspending and Resuming a Guest System A guest system can be suspended and resumed using the virsh tool s suspend and resume options For example to suspend a specific system named myXenGuest virsh suspend myGuest Similarly to resume the paused system virsh resume myGuest Note that a suspended session will be lost if the host

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Managing_KVM_on_RHEL_6_using_the_virsh_Command-line_Tool (2016-02-13)
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  • Managing and Monitoring RHEL 6 based KVM Guest Systems - Techotopia
    the play button in the toolbar To access the console window of running the guest click on the Open toolbar button To stop a virtual machine running a guest OS it is not sufficient to simply close the Virtual Machine Console and Virtual Machine Manager windows Doing so only closes the manager and console leaving the guest operating system running in the background To shutdown a guest OS either shut it down using the operating system s own shut down mechanism select an option from the Virtual Machine Console Virtual Machine Shutdown menu or right click on the guest OS from the list in the virt manager main screen and select Shutdown Pausing a KVM Guest Operating System KVM provides the ability to pause and resume a running guest operating system To pause a running system either select Pause in the Virtual Machine Console Virtual Machine menu or right click the operating system in the virt manager main screen and select Pause A paused guest OS may then be resumed either by clicking again on the Pause menu option in the Virtual Machine Console or right clicking the operating system in the virt manager main screen and selecting Resume Note that a paused guest system instance will not survive the reboot of the host operating system and continues to use system memory in the paused state In the event that the host operating system is rebooted the guest operating system will need to be restarted and cannot be resumed from its paused state Changing KVM Virtual Guest System Settings During the initial configuration of the guest OS in virt manager a number of resources such as memory allocation and CPU usage were defined It is common to discover after the guest OS starts running that these settings need to be changed Fortunately virt manager makes it easy to change these settings Settings are changed from within the Details screen of the Virtual Machine console window If this window is not currently visible it can be accessed by launching virt manager and double clicking on the virtual machine for which the configuration settings are to be changed Once the viewer is visible select View Details or click on the blue information button on the toolbar to display the screen illustrated in the following figure google RHEL6BOX google The details screen consists of a list of categories on the left hand side and the settings corresponding to the currently selected category in the main panel The panel on the left allows the currently displayed category to be changed For example to change the memory assigned to the guest system select the Memory option and change the settings as required clicking the Apply button to commit the new settings Note that changes to memory for a currently running guest will not take effect until the guest is rebooted Additional disks and other devices may be added by clicking on the Add Hardware button at the bottom of the hardware category list selecting Storage

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Managing_and_Monitoring_RHEL_6_based_KVM_Guest_Systems (2016-02-13)
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  • Adding a New Disk Drive to an RHEL 6 System - Techotopia
    Disk to an RHEL 6 Volume Group and Logical Volume for details on configuring Logical Volumes Creating Linux Partitions The next step is to create one or more Linux partitions on the new disk drive This is achieved using the fdisk utility which takes as a command line argument the device to be partitioned su fdisk dev sdb Device contains neither a valid DOS partition table nor Sun SGI or OSF disklabel Building a new DOS disklabel with disk identifier 0xd1082b01 Changes will remain in memory only until you decide to write them After that of course the previous content won t be recoverable Warning invalid flag 0x0000 of partition table 4 will be corrected by w rite WARNING DOS compatible mode is deprecated It s strongly recommended to switch off the mode command c and change display units to sectors command u Command m for help As instructed switch off DOS compatible mode and change the units to sectors by entering the c and u commands Command m for help c DOS Compatibility flag is not set Command m for help u Changing display entry units to sectors In order to view the current partitions on the disk enter the p command Command m for help p Disk dev sdb 34 4 GB 34359738368 bytes 255 heads 63 sectors track 4177 cylinders Units cylinders of 16065 512 8225280 bytes Sector size logical physical 512 bytes 512 bytes I O size minimum optimal 512 bytes 512 bytes Disk identifier 0xd1082b01 Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System As we can see from the above fdisk output the disk currently has no partitions because it is a previously unused disk The next step is to create a new partition on the disk a task which is performed by entering n for new partition and p for primary partition Command m for help n Command action e extended p primary partition 1 4 p Partition number 1 4 In this example we only plan to create one partition which will be partition 1 Next we need to specify where the partition will begin and end Since this is the first partition we need it to start at the first available sector and since we want to use the entire disk we specify the last sector as the end Note that if you wish to create multiple partitions you can specify the size of each partition by sectors bytes kilobytes or megabytes Partition number 1 4 1 First sector 2048 67108863 default 2048 Using default value 2048 Last sector sectors or size K M G 2048 67108863 default 67108863 Using default value 67108863 Now that we have specified the partition we need to write it to the disk using the w command Command m for help w The partition table has been altered Calling ioctl to re read partition table Syncing disks If we now look at the devices again we will see that the new partition is visible as dev sdb1 ls

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Adding_a_New_Disk_Drive_to_an_RHEL_6_System (2016-02-13)
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  • Adding a New Disk to an RHEL 6 Volume Group and Logical Volume - Techotopia
    the RHEL 6 system Before making any changes to the LVM setup however it is important to first gather information Running the mount command on will typically show output similar to the following dev mapper vg rhel6 lv root on type ext4 rw proc on proc type proc rw sysfs on sys type sysfs rw devpts on dev pts type devpts rw gid 5 mode 620 tmpfs on dev shm type tmpfs rw rootcontext system u object r tmpfs t s0 dev sda1 on boot type ext4 rw none on proc sys fs binfmt misc type binfmt misc rw sunrpc on var lib nfs rpc pipefs type rpc pipefs rw dev sr0 on media RHEL 6 0 x86 64 Disc 1 type iso9660 ro nosuid nodev uhelper udisks uid 500 gid 500 iocharset utf8 mode 0400 dmode 0500 Information about the volume group can be obtained using the usr sbin vgdisplay command vgdisplay Volume group VG Name vg rhel6 System ID Format lvm2 Metadata Areas 1 Metadata Sequence No 3 VG Access read write VG Status resizable MAX LV 0 Cur LV 2 Open LV 2 Max PV 0 Cur PV 1 Act PV 1 VG Size 15 51 GiB PE Size 4 00 MiB Total PE 3970 Alloc PE Size 3970 15 51 GiB Free PE Size 0 0 VG UUID 7RKLdp Lc86 twXj 1QOf BKFf i0HP 5vSyYd As we can see the in the above example vg rhel6 has a physical extend size of 4 00MB and has a total of 15 51GB available for allocation to logical volumes Currently 3970 physical extents are allocated equaling the total 15 51GB capacity If we want to increase the space allocated to any logical volumes in vg rhel6 we will need to add one or more physical volumes The same information can be viewed graphically using the Logical Volume Manager tool accessed by selecting the System Administration Logical Volume Management menu option This tool is not installed by default so if the menu option is not available the tool may be installed from a terminal window by entering the following commands su yum install system config lvm Once installed and running the tool will appear as illustrated in the following figure Information about logical volumes in a volume group may similarly be obtained using the lvdisplay command lvdisplay Logical volume LV Name dev vg rhel6 lv root VG Name vg rhel6 LV UUID nU70n0 scyi xp2S 1CNq GUa1 4Vad gQKIOO LV Write Access read write LV Status available open 1 LV Size 13 54 GiB Current LE 3466 Segments 1 Allocation inherit Read ahead sectors auto currently set to 256 Block device 253 0 Logical volume LV Name dev vg rhel6 lv swap VG Name vg rhel6 LV UUID 5uVonb SCk2 bedt 4Oj3 LGpq TpsA qyCGEl LV Write Access read write LV Status available open 1 LV Size 1 97 GiB Current LE 504 Segments 1 Allocation inherit Read ahead sectors auto currently set to 256 Block device 253 1

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Adding_a_New_Disk_to_an_RHEL_6_Volume_Group_and_Logical_Volume (2016-02-13)
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  • Adding and Managing RHEL 6 Swap Space - Techotopia
    records in 128000 0 records out 131072000 bytes 131 MB copied 1 7639 seconds 74 3 MB s Configure the file as swap mkswap newswap mkswap newswap warning don t erase bootbits sectors on whole disk Use f to force Setting up swapspace version 1 size 127996 KiB no label UUID 91588fb6 ac01 47f6 bb42 064c1c7c4599 Add the swap file to the system in real time swapon newswap Finally modify the etc fstab file to automatically add the new swap at system boot time by adding the following line newswap swap swap defaults 0 0 Adding Swap to an RHEL 6 LVM Swap Volume By default RHEL 6 configures swap space using Logical Volume Management LVM An alternative to adding swap via file therefore is to extend the logical volume used for the swap The first step is to identify the current amount of swap available and the volume group and logical volume used for the swap space for more information on LVM refer to the chapter entitled Adding a New Disk to an RHEL 6 Volume Group and Logical Volume lvdisplay Logical volume LV Name dev vg rhel6 lv root VG Name vg rhel6 LV UUID nU70n0 scyi xp2S 1CNq GUa1 4Vad gQKIOO LV Write Access read write LV Status available open 1 LV Size 23 54 GiB Current LE 6026 Segments 2 Allocation inherit Read ahead sectors auto currently set to 256 Block device 253 0 Logical volume LV Name dev vg rhel6 lv swap VG Name vg rhel6 LV UUID 5uVonb SCk2 bedt 4Oj3 LGpq TpsA qyCGEl LV Write Access read write LV Status available open 1 LV Size 1 97 GiB Current LE 504 Segments 1 Allocation inherit Read ahead sectors auto currently set to 256 Block device 253 1 Clearly the swap resides on logical volume lv swap which in part of volume group vg rhel6 The next step is to verify if there is any space available on the volume group that can be allocated to swap volume vgs VG PV LV SN Attr VSize VFree vg rhel6 2 2 0 wz n 47 50g 22 00g If the amount of space available is sufficient to meet additional swap requirements turn off the swap and extend the swap logical volume to use the additional space swapoff dev vg rhel6 lv swap lvextend L 3GB dev vg rhel6 lv swap Extending logical volume lv swap to 4 97 GiB Logical volume lv swap successfully resized Next reformat the swap volume and turn the swap back on mkswap dev vg rhel6 lv swap mkswap dev vg rhel6 lv swap warning don t erase bootbits sectors on whole disk Use f to force Setting up swapspace version 1 size 5210108 KiB no label UUID acd810b6 6522 43c8 b16d a3f365288b15 swapon dev vg rhel6 lv swap Having made the changes check that the swap space as increased swapon s Filename Type Size Used Priority dev dm 1 partition 5210104 0 1 Adding Swap Space to the Volume Group

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Adding_and_Managing_RHEL_6_Swap_Space (2016-02-13)
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  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Essentials - Techotopia
    RHEL 6 Desktop Keyboard Shortcuts Viewing Keyboard Shortcuts Changing a Shortcut Disabling a Keyboard Shortcut Adding a Custom Shortcut Using the Bash Shell on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 What is a Shell Gaining Access to the Shell Entering Commands at the Prompt Getting Information about a Command Bash Command line Editing Working with the Shell History Filename Shorthand File Name and Path Completion Input and Output Redirection Working with Pipes in the Bash Shell Configuring Aliases Environment Variables Writing Shell Scripts Configuring RHEL 6 Runlevels and Services Understanding RHEL 6 Runlevels Understanding RHEL 6 Services RHEL Runlevels Descriptions Configuring the Default RHEL 6 Runlevel Changing the Current Runlevel from within a Running RHEL 6 System Identifying Services that Start at Each Runlevel Changing the Services for a Runlevel Managing RHEL 6 Users and Groups Adding a New User to an RHEL 6 System Editing the Properties of a User Deleting a User from an RHEL System Adding a New Group to an RHEL 6 System Modifying an RHEL 6 Group Deleting a Group from an RHEL System Basic RHEL 6 Firewall Configuration Configuring a Basic RHEL 6 Firewall Configuring Firewall Settings using the Wizard Configuring Firewall Port Settings Configuring Other Ports Configuring Trusted Interfaces Masquerading Port Forwarding ICMP Filtering Custom Rules Configuring the Firewall from a Terminal using iptables Configuring RHEL 6 Printers Installing a Directly Connected Printer Manually Installing a New Locally Connected Printer and Printer Driver Adding a Network Printer Configuring a Printer Connected to a Windows System Configuring a Printer Connected to a Remote System Remote Access to the RHEL 6 Desktop Installing Remote Desktop Support Activating Remote Desktop Access Secure and Insecure Remote Desktop Access Firewall Configuration Accessing a Remote RHEL Desktop using vncviewer Accessing a Remote RHEL Desktop from a Windows System Establishing a Secure Remote Desktop Session Establishing a Secure Remote Desktop Session from a Windows System Creating Additional Desktops Shutting Down a Desktop Session Configuring RHEL 6 Remote Access using SSH Installing SSH on an RHEL 6 System Configuring the RHEL Firewall to Allow SSH Connections Using SSH on RHEL Copying files using SSH Disabling the SSH Server Displaying RHEL 6 Applications Remotely X11 Forwarding Requirements for Remotely Displaying RHEL 6 Applications Remotely Displaying an RHEL 6 Application Trusted X11 Forwarding Compressed X11 Forwarding Using NFS to Share RHEL 6 Folders with Remote Linux and UNIX Systems Ensuring NFS Services are running on RHEL 6 Configuring the RHEL 6 Firewall to Allow NFS Traffic Specifying the Folders to be Shared Accessing Shared RHEL 6 Folders Mounting an NFS Filesystem on RHEL System Startup Unmounting an NFS Mount Point Sharing Files between RHEL 6 and Windows Systems with Samba Samba and Samba Client Installing Samba on an RHEL 6 System Configuring the RHEL Firewall to Enable Samba Configuring the smb conf File Configuring the global Section Configuring a Shared Resource Creating a Samba User Testing the smb conf File Starting the Samba and NetBIOS Name Services on RHEL 6 Accessing Samba Shares Accessing

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php?title=Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux_6_Essentials&oldid=22407 (2016-02-13)
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  • Pages that link to "Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Essentials" - Techotopia
    links Installing RHEL 6 with Windows in Dual Boot Environment links Allocating a Windows Disk Partition to RHEL 6 links Logging into the RHEL 6 GNOME Desktop links Configuring RHEL 6 GNOME Screen Resolution and Multiple Monitors links A Guided Tour of the RHEL 6 GNOME Desktop links Configuring the RHEL 6 GNOME Desktop Background links Installing and Customizing RHEL 6 Desktop Themes links Configuring RHEL 6 Desktop Fonts links Configuring the RHEL 6 GNOME Desktop Panels links Configuring the RHEL 6 Desktop Menu System links Browsing the System Files and Folders on the RHEL 6 Desktop links Configuring the RHEL 6 Nautilus File Manager links RHEL 6 Desktop Starting Applications on Login links Configuring RHEL 6 Desktop Keyboard Shortcuts links Configuring RHEL 6 Runlevels and Services links Managing RHEL 6 Users and Groups links Basic RHEL 6 Firewall Configuration links Remote Access to the RHEL 6 Desktop links Configuring RHEL 6 Remote Access using SSH links Displaying RHEL 6 Applications Remotely X11 Forwarding links Using NFS to Share RHEL 6 Folders with Remote Linux and UNIX Systems links Sharing Files between RHEL 6 and Windows Systems with Samba links Configuring an RHEL 6 Based Web Server links Configuring an

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Special:WhatLinksHere/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux_6_Essentials (2016-02-13)
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  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Essentials - Techotopia
    Shell Gaining Access to the Shell Entering Commands at the Prompt Getting Information about a Command Bash Command line Editing Working with the Shell History Filename Shorthand File Name and Path Completion Input and Output Redirection Working with Pipes in the Bash Shell Configuring Aliases Environment Variables Writing Shell Scripts Configuring RHEL 6 Runlevels and Services Understanding RHEL 6 Runlevels Understanding RHEL 6 Services RHEL Runlevels Descriptions Configuring the Default RHEL 6 Runlevel Changing the Current Runlevel from within a Running RHEL 6 System Identifying Services that Start at Each Runlevel Changing the Services for a Runlevel Managing RHEL 6 Users and Groups Adding a New User to an RHEL 6 System Editing the Properties of a User Deleting a User from an RHEL System Adding a New Group to an RHEL 6 System Modifying an RHEL 6 Group Deleting a Group from an RHEL System Basic RHEL 6 Firewall Configuration Configuring a Basic RHEL 6 Firewall Configuring Firewall Settings using the Wizard Configuring Firewall Port Settings Configuring Other Ports Configuring Trusted Interfaces Masquerading Port Forwarding ICMP Filtering Custom Rules Configuring the Firewall from a Terminal using iptables Configuring RHEL 6 Printers Installing a Directly Connected Printer Manually Installing a New Locally Connected Printer and Printer Driver Adding a Network Printer Configuring a Printer Connected to a Windows System Configuring a Printer Connected to a Remote System Remote Access to the RHEL 6 Desktop Installing Remote Desktop Support Activating Remote Desktop Access Secure and Insecure Remote Desktop Access Firewall Configuration Accessing a Remote RHEL Desktop using vncviewer Accessing a Remote RHEL Desktop from a Windows System Establishing a Secure Remote Desktop Session Establishing a Secure Remote Desktop Session from a Windows System Creating Additional Desktops Shutting Down a Desktop Session Configuring RHEL 6 Remote Access using SSH Installing SSH on an RHEL 6 System Configuring the RHEL Firewall to Allow SSH Connections Using SSH on RHEL Copying files using SSH Disabling the SSH Server Displaying RHEL 6 Applications Remotely X11 Forwarding Requirements for Remotely Displaying RHEL 6 Applications Remotely Displaying an RHEL 6 Application Trusted X11 Forwarding Compressed X11 Forwarding Using NFS to Share RHEL 6 Folders with Remote Linux and UNIX Systems Ensuring NFS Services are running on RHEL 6 Configuring the RHEL 6 Firewall to Allow NFS Traffic Specifying the Folders to be Shared Accessing Shared RHEL 6 Folders Mounting an NFS Filesystem on RHEL System Startup Unmounting an NFS Mount Point Sharing Files between RHEL 6 and Windows Systems with Samba Samba and Samba Client Installing Samba on an RHEL 6 System Configuring the RHEL Firewall to Enable Samba Configuring the smb conf File Configuring the global Section Configuring a Shared Resource Creating a Samba User Testing the smb conf File Starting the Samba and NetBIOS Name Services on RHEL 6 Accessing Samba Shares Accessing Windows Shares from RHEL 6 Configuring an RHEL 6 Based Web Server Requirements for Configuring an RHEL 6 Web Server Installing the Apache Web Server on RHEL 6 Starting the Apache Web

    Original URL path: http://www.techotopia.com/index.php?title=Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux_6_Essentials&printable=yes (2016-02-13)
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