archive-com.com » COM » T » TONYWUBLOG.COM

Total: 323

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • New Handles for Nauticam Nikon D800 Underwater Housing
    far too jet lagged to compose even somewhat intelligible gibberish But rest assured it s about more than just chasing megapixels Nauticam D800 housing handle comparison Anyway although I used Nikon cameras before it s taken me a bit of time to get reacquainted with the controls and functionality The most irritating difference between the two manufacturers is that you need to twist Nikon and Canon lenses in opposite directions to mount remove them And of course taking any new camera underwater involves selecting a housing system in my case a Nauticam D800 housing I m still using Zillion housings for my Canon cameras I tested my D800 and housing with a Sigma 15mm fisheye lens and Pro One dome port when I was in Western Australia visiting with sea lions earlier this year and I loved the set up There was however one issue that I encountered My hands are not particularly big so the handles were spaced just a little too far from the housing for me I had to stretch my index finger to depress the shutter In most circumstances this shouldn t pose a problem but it was uncomfortable and in low light slow shutter speed situations this issue could magnify camera shake and result in blur Well if you re like me and have relatively small hands there s good news Nauticam has released a new handle configuration with spacing that is 10mm 0 39 inches closer to the housing just about perfect for me Taking into consideration the fact that you might need different spacing for different occasions like when you wear thick gloves for colder water for example Nauticam provides spacers with the narrow handles When inserted between the new narrow handles and the housing these spacers add back 10mm of length taking

    Original URL path: http://www.tonywublog.com/journal/nauticam-nikon-d800-housing-new-handles (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Using Nik Filters with Photoshop Smart Objects and Underwater Photos
    use Smart Objects you d need to close the file and re open from the RAW file With Smart Objects just double click the layer and you re back to where you started so you can readjust and be on your way More importantly you can keep doing this even much farther into editing so long as you are editing on a Smart Object and maintain a chain of Smart Objects duplicate layers as Smart Objects 2 Tip 2 Use Nik Dfine 2 0 and Sharpener Pro 3 0 I tried many variations of using the noise reduction and RAW sharpening dialogues in Camera RAW but heck if I could work out what to do I have better things to do than wing sliders around til I m blue in the face So what I ve settled upon is to use no noise reduction or sharpening in Camera RAW actually slide everything to zero and instead duplicate my original Smart Object layer and immediately apply Nik Dfine 2 0 and Sharpener Pro 3 0 Duplicate original layer apply Nik Dfine 2 0 Sharpener Pro 3 0 It s not necessary to duplicate the original layer You can apply the filters to the original I just like to keep things tidy I ve found that the default settings for Dfine 2 0 and the RAW Sharpener in Sharpener Pro 3 0 usually do a great job of reducing noise and applying initial sharpening Occasionally I have to fiddle but not nearly as often as I d need to do if I tried using Camera RAW for noise reduction and initial sharpening Here s the kicker Let s say I step away from my computer for some coffee come back wide awake and realise that I flubbed an initial setting in RAW conversion All I need to do is double click my original layer and the Camera RAW dialogue comes up I make my adjustments hit go and the changes carry through including through the Nik filters that I ve just applied See why this is oh so cool and useful Like magic Open Smart Object get back to original Camera RAW dialogue Tip 3 Apply More Nik Filters on Smart Objects Due to my non love for editing I do my best to get as close to spot on with exposures framing etc as possible in camera If there s too much work involved I m not going to attempt the edit So in practicality most of the edits I need to do can be achieved through using other Nik Filters again on Smart Objects Remember that if you use any of the Nik Filters on Smart Objects you can always double click on the filter and re do it Plus pay attention to this one Nik Filters have a built in way for you to achieve masking without actually needing to worry about masking As an example one of my favourite filters is Pro Contrast in Nik Color Efex Pro

    Original URL path: http://www.tonywublog.com/journal/using-nik-filters-with-photoshop-smart-objects-underwater-photography (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Using Nik Software to Edit Humpback Whale Photo | Tony Wu Photography
    issue but here it was perfect as my objective is to draw your eye to the whales not the background There was a bit of detail loss in the whales as well but I had a plan for that step 6 normal sharpening at the end of the editing process 2 Color Efex Pro 4 Graduated ND Filter After cleaning up the noise I decided that I wanted to even out the exposure levels a bit between the sky and the ocean so I turned to the Gradated Neutral Density filter in Color Efex Pro This is where I learned about Control Points which is Nik Software s method for applying the effects you want in a selective manner In this instance I wanted the sky sea exposure levels to be more even but I didn t want the whales to be affected So I used the Graduated ND filter to make the sky darker with the reduction in exposure values gradually decreasing as I moved down the image I then used the Control Points to tell Color Efex Pro to exclude the whales from the adjustment Using the mask view to see what areas the control points are affecting The white light areas are where the filter is being applied The dark areas are where the filter is not being applied I m not prepared to go into a full explanation here of how the Control Points work partly because I m still figuring it out myself If you want to learn more about the Control Points head over to the Nik Software site and look at their video tutorials That s what I did The values I set to determine to top to bottom differential in exposure were small 10 at the top and 0 at the bottom as I generally only want to make minor barely noticeable tweaks Here is the result barely noticeable right Nik Color Efex Pro 4 Graduated ND Filter 3 Color Efex Pro 4 Brilliance Warmth Filter Once that was done I decided to add a dash of saturation to the whales to try to get them to stand out a bit from the nearly monotone background To do this I used the Perceptual Saturation slider in the Brilliance Warmth Filter Here s before applying the slider Before applying the Perceptual Saturation slider And here s after After applying the Perceptual Saturation slider This time I used the Control Points to concentrate the effect on the whales not the water or mountains and I applied only a very subtle effect Perceptual Saturation slider on 7 leaving Saturation and Warmth at 0 The Perceptual Saturation slider is really cool I m not sure how to describe the effect but it sort of figures out what where needs a saturation boost and adjust colours in a dynamic manner It s more intelligent subtle than just pumping up saturation in Photoshop 4 Color Efex Pro 4 Glamor Glow Filter This probably isn t a filter you

    Original URL path: http://www.tonywublog.com/journal/editing-photographs-with-nik-software-define-color-efex-silver-efex (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Learning To Use A Lytro | Tony Wu's Underwater Photography Blog
    With the benefit of some hands on time with the camera and a reasonable amount of head scratching I ve worked out that what makes Lytro images unique is the ability to infuse multiple dimensions into a single scene to convey a story by enabling the viewer to explore into a given living image It took a bit of time for me to figure this out As is typical I didn t look at the Lytro site or otherwise seek advice before going out to shoot Eric gave me a rapid fire rundown on the basics of how to turn the camera on turn it off zoom etc but beyond that I basically just experimented which is pretty much how I approach anything new yes I never read instruction manuals I m not ashamed to admit that I didn t really get it at first I took photos as I normally would and ended up with shots that well didn t do much for me either aesthetically or in terms of making use of the Lytro s re focus capability My Eureka moment came when I decided to devote an entire day to fiddling with the Lytro I waited for good weather then hopped over to visit the large Buddha at the Kotoku in temple in Kamakura Japan where I took this photo As soon as I reviewed the picture on the Lytro s built in LCD I knew I had a keeper I realised that a big part of the reason the photo worked was that I had thought of the story I wanted to convey first and then took the photo As I walked into the temple grounds I thought Wouldn t it be cool if I could show my friends that I visited the big Buddha statue and also illustrate that the admission tickets have an image of the Buddha printed on them Of course this would ve been possible to some extent with a normal photograph or series of photos but with the Lytro image I m able to let the viewer explore one aspect of the story at a time to use the depth engendered by the re focus capability of the Lytro to convey multiple inter related messages within a single static image but in a dynamic manner Click on the image to re focus With this understanding that dynamic multi dimensional storytelling is at the core of a Lytro image it quickly became easy for me to spot situations that might be suitable for a Lytro picture This photo for instance communicates the pleasant experience I had of purchasing nicely packaged osenbei Japanese rice crackers from a very helpful saleswoman Clicking on the branches in this photo highlights the accumulation of snow on branches while clicking on the person immerses you in the experience of someone enjoying the snow In all of these images the ability to dive into and explore various parts of a picture adds a new dimension that doesn t

    Original URL path: http://www.tonywublog.com/journal/learning-to-use-a-lytro-camera (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 10 Tips to Help You Win Photo Contests
    in the most appropriate one 4 Nix Xerox Shots There is a fine line between emulating someone s photo style and just plain copying it One of the advantages of being involved with several major contest is that I ve seen lots of images I don t always pick up on photos that are straight copies of other winning photos but when I do I immediately cut them No questions asked I might be more of a stickler about this than other people are but to me photography is art Art by definition requires originality There s certainly nothing wrong with studying other people s images and learning from them in fact that s the best way to improve but if you want your images to receive recognition in a competition avoid using the Xerox machine 5 Bin Trendy Shots Trends and fads come and go I hate fads of all types not just ones pertaining to photography Fads can be subjects fads can be techniques fads can be places But in all cases fads are easy to recognise and they re bad especially in the context of entering contests With the ease of communication and information flow facilitated by the internet these days it s particularly easy to sucked into the latest trend There is absolutely nothing wrong with going to the latest in destination photographing the latest cool animal or trying the latest new gadget but just keep in mind that when everyone is visiting the same place photographing the same animal or using the same tool it s difficult for your image to stand out from the crowd because by definition fads foster conformity not originality An example here is the use of snoots Snoots are not new or original by a long shot In recent months though they ve become an in thing with lots of photos that were obviously taken with a snoot showing up on the net and in contests Whenever I see a photo with an overexposed spot cone of light surrounded by black I want to gag Don t get me wrong I have used snoots and snoot like instruments for dog years and I love them But the thing about snoots is that they are tools They are not magic sauce that makes an otherwise dull photo into a prize winning image And as with the use of other tools it s usually best when the result is subtle In other words if the first reaction that someone has when looking at your photo is Oh you used a snoot then the tool has overpowered the subject Photography is about subjects not tools 6 View Greyscale Monochrome Shots with Scepticism If you greyscale an underwater image or convert it to black and white there has to be a good reason Too often people do this just because the visibility is bad That s not a good reason bad viz is just part of underwater photography There are certainly some images that

    Original URL path: http://www.tonywublog.com/journal/10-tips-to-help-you-win-photo-contests (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Quad Ball Adapter Made By Xit 404
    where you can secure a standard T plate mount Here I ve attached one of the adapters to a T plate on a housing grip and then hooked up four ball joints to the adapter Close up view of quad ball adapter with four balls Though it s certainly possible to use four balls at one time in practice I only used two on either side of my housing I attached strobe arms to one ball joint and used the remaining one on either side as a means to clamp down bits and pieces light modifiers and such in a secure manner in effect using the spare ball joints as extra hands to hold onto stuff I thought I might need i e allowing me to carry even more junk than normal The extra ball joints also came in handy when I wanted to carry both strobes and constant lighting sources at the same time such as when I wanted to have a focus light for shooting Dinah s gobies or when I thought it would be useful to have the flexibility of switching between taking still images and video footage I m a big fan of simple effective solutions

    Original URL path: http://www.tonywublog.com/journal/quad-ball-adapter-made-by-xit-404 (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Using Sola 1200 Lights to Photograph B-17 Black Jack Wreck
    posted before but there was a considerable amount of stuff in the water so controlling backscatter would have been a challenge I m sure it would ve been possible to take reasonably clean images with strobe light but it would ve taken time which is something I didn t have at that depth Instead of using strobes I took a couple of Sola 1200 lights down mounted on Ultralight arms in place of my strobes Why did I do this To add a hint of light and colour for considerably less effort and lower risk of creating backscatter than using strobes Julian taking a photo of the Black Jack B 17 wreck As you can see from the photo above the Sola 1200 lights allowed me to light Julian a bit as well as the nose of the plane I got some added light from Julian who had one of my Sola 600 lights mounted on his camera pointing at the plane There s nowhere near the amount of light and colour that strobes could generate but in this circumstance it was a heckuva lot quicker and simpler than fiddling with strobes There s a lot to be said for quick and easy Here s another photo where I was able to isolate one of the props and get really close concentrating both lights on a single area to bring out more colour Prop of Black Jack B17 bomber wreck at 40m lit with Sola 1200 As an unanticipated side benefit this lighting set up also came in handy for shooing Craig away when he cut in front of me pointing at his camera while babbling incoherently normal behaviour for him Craig asking me for photo advice at 40 metres I aimed the Sola lights directly for his face mostly

    Original URL path: http://www.tonywublog.com/journal/photographing-blackjack-b17-bomber-wreck-with-sola-1200-lights (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Underwater Photography Blog | Tony Wu
    2007 November 2007 October 2007 September 2007 August 2007 July 2007 June 2007 May 2007 April 2007 March 2007 February 2007 January 2006 December 2006 November 2006 October 2006 September 2006 August 2006 July 2006 June Posts in Equipment Technique Monday Jun 27 2011 Black Jack B 17 Bomber I m not big on wrecks I know a lot of people are including many of my friends but I m already obsessed with marine life and I figure one obsession is more than enough On the final of the three legs of this adventure however I had to give in sigh and we visited a couple of wrecks including this well known site at Cape Vogel where a B 17 bomber known as Black Jack sits at 40 metres Black Jack B 17 bomber wreck at 40 metres Bob Halstead Continue Reading Places Adventures Equipment Technique Saturday Jun 25 2011 Dinah s Goby We ve just arrived back in Alotau after another terrific journey of exploration aboard Continue Reading Photography Marine Life Places Adventures Equipment Technique Monday Jun 13 2011 Friendly Fish Faces For our final day of this second of three cruises aboard Continue Reading Photography Marine Life Places Adventures Equipment Technique Friday Dec 17 2010 Multimedia Project Workflow Having spent the past few days completely buried in editing I m still a bit wired with my brain stuck in editing mode I decided to direct my OCD energy into something productive so I put together the diagram below which sets out the workflow I followed for my Continue Reading Equipment Technique Sunday Nov 21 2010 Equipment Note SOLA 600 Lights This has been the trip to try new stuff In addition to the Continue Reading Equipment Technique Thursday Nov 18 2010 Equipment Note Totomega Insect Eye Lens If

    Original URL path: http://www.tonywublog.com/journal/category/equipment-technique/P10 (2016-04-26)
    Open archived version from archive



  •