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  • Utilities Under Fire Why Rate Hikes Are A Scary Proposition
    would think that the prospect of not having adequate water service would peak customers concerns but it s the prospect of losing about 20 per month that seems to worry them more or at least the angriest loudest of them The reaction is scary in fact Here s a picture sent in from the anonymous utility worker taken during a water district takeover staged outside a utility board meeting I ll withhold the name of the municipality as well so as not to impeach the community at large the display represents only a specific faction though a sizable one We had 100 to 300 ticked off people in our building my source estimated Yes that s a hypothetical water district representative being hanged in effigy Though this method of expression is a long standing form of protest it s also a bit heavy handed for these times and for the situation After all the rate increases are not motivated by profit but to give the municipality the means to deliver a safe sustainable water supply to its customers including those who threaten them even if it is figuratively I ve grown accustomed to the threats something new every day like this sign said the utility worker a water conservation representative for the water district The reason We raised the base rate up 20 This is freedom of speech at play of course and the voice of the people should be heard But this somewhat extreme reaction to a rate increase highlights the importance of public outreach and value of water campaigns While 20 may be an admittedly large percentage increase in relation to a typical monthly bill this is also said to be an affluent community and what s the price of water security There may be a parallel and

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/utilities-under-fire-why-rate-hikes-are-a-scary-proposition-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • What Happens When Conservation Leaves Revenue Short
    conditions in California the most severe drought in the last 1 200 years Facing these bleak realities Governor Jerry Brown had little choice but to take action On April 1 he directed the State Water Resources Control Board to implement mandatory urban water usage reduction of 25 percent As Californians he said during a press conference to announce the cutbacks we must pull together and save water in every way possible In Los Angeles the 3 8 million residents answered the call and reduced consumption by about 10 percent more than their provider expected While inarguably a triumph against the drought the effort left the municipality in a jam According to a Los Angeles Times report 18 billion gallons of water went unsold and left the Department of Water and Power LADWP 111 million short on revenue Citing a 380 million need for infrastructure improvements and treatment costs the LADWP Commissioners approved a pass through charge of 1 80 more a month for the average consumer to begin next year and last until 2017 Our customers have done a tremendous job of really conserving water which is great for the city Neil Guglielmo DWP s director of budget rates and financial planning said during an October 20 presentation to the LADWP Board of Commissioners And what that means is there is an impact in terms of our financials LADWP hasn t raised its base charge for service in five years and since its rates are determined by volume conservation has always hit its bottom line Pointing to a water revenue adjustment ordinance that was adopted in 1993 to ensure recovery of the fixed cost for transporting and distributing water Guglielmo explained that the pass through charge what he referred to as a water revenue adjustment factor would recover 57 million needed for financial stability while the rest of the savings from the conservation efforts would be passed on to ratepayers Even with this adjustment our customers are going to save money Jeffrey L Peltola LADWP chief financial officer told the board Our customers will save about 54 million in total The average customer you ll see because of their conservation they will save about 3 26 per month LADWP did not respond to a request for comment about how it introduced the increase to ratepayers or how those customers have responded to the news While the extra charge formally termed the resolution approving the Water Revenue Adjustment Factor during the meeting was met with unanimous approval from the board news sources have found ratepayers to be understandably flummoxed by the result of their conservation efforts Our Sara Jerome unearthed a soundbite from one Los Feliz resident who felt penalized for doing such a good job in her October coverage of the charge increase The Times followed up on an LADWP promoted hashtag and found a tweet reading LADWP hikes rates because they aren t making enough revenue We re saving water like were supposed to U mad I am Los

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/what-happens-when-conservation-leaves-revenue-short-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • Jersey Strong A QA With Public Utility Commissioner Mary-Anna Holden
    to your water system about it or you can just go and find someone that s qualified Then something that we haven t used enough in our state there has been the ability to have public private partnerships where someone else is managing the public utilities And with the more successful municipalities the industrial utility that s taken over the system has continued to employ the same employees given them better training given them better equipment The other thing that I see and every state is struggling with I see energy efficiency through water efficiency as one of the ways we re going to reach our goals also in the increase in anaerobic digestion and methane capture We have one pilot project in New Jersey that s been very successful where they actually go to the restaurants and the communities and they take the fats oils and greases that would normally be trucked into a landfill and they feed it to the digester That really increases the methane production with very little grit very little sludge What do you see as the biggest obstacles to innovation in the water and wastewater industries I think the industry is willing to innovate It s not something we discourage we certainly encourage it We have a lot of pilot programs in New Jersey In our clean energy program we have something called the Edison Innovation Grant where we have tried to spur innovation and work with the Economic Development Authority to find these little startups Governor Chris Christie said we were going to focus on wastewater plants in particular because of the huge sewer overflows that we had in New York and New Jersey during Superstorm Sandy We ve got 19 cities in our state that have combined sewer overflow What can we do to mitigate that We re looking at starting this green infrastructure which is the least cost but how do you address some of these other problems There are a lot of great ideas coming out I m inspired by some of them that I ve seen in New York City and upper New York State I would like to innovate but sometimes it s complimentary to just copy someone else There certainly isn t any resistance to innovation from the executive branch to try some things and experiment and move forward Are there particular opportunities for innovation that you see at the moment People don t understand the value of water because they don t see it They just see what comes out of their tap and goes down their toilet They don t have the appreciation for everything that s buried underground That s really something we have to ratchet up in the discussion That s I think the biggest frustration One of the good things I see going forward is the conversation about water reuse Obviously right now you take advantage of a horrible situation in California with the drought This is an opportunity to really step

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/jersey-strong-a-q-a-with-public-utility-commissioner-mary-anna-holden-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • 5 On 5 Water Leaders Address Key Industry Challenges
    The agriculture industry with runoff from fertilizer and animal waste is a notable nonpoint discharger Hawkins suggested that regulations aimed solely at treatment plants to reduce nutrient loads are missing the point or nonpoint actually The cost of removing one increment of nutrients has gone up 100 fold in the last 10 years at DC Water he noted Indeed as utility expenses skyrocket in an attempt to remove one more part per million nonpoint sources often go unchecked Lamented Hawkins If all of our plants were at zero nutrients it wouldn t clean up the problems that we have How will utilities address PPCPs pharmaceuticals and personal care products particularly difficult to treat microbeads There was also shared thinking among panel members on PPCP contaminants which can be very expensive to remove wastewater treatment plants simply aren t equipped for what cosmetics manufacturers are developing and discharging Practically speaking there is a better approach than installing new to deal with these emerging contaminants We need to think more broadly about what we allow on the store shelf suggested San Jose s Kerrie Romanow The cost of treatment remediation should fall on the microbeads manufacturer agreed Hawkins And in fact there have been calls to ban the pesky particulates Concurring with Hawkins and Romanow St Pierre drew an analogy comparing water stewardship to preventative healthcare Treatment plants are like hospitals for water he said Maybe we should treat the patient before it gets to the hospital What will the impact of an aging workforce be on utilities and how can the industry attract younger talent All five panelists expressed the dire need to recruit and retain talented employees or as North Texas Tom Kula dubbed them solutioneers Kula shared his experience at NTMWD which has a strategic hiring plan that emphasizes core values that must be shared by the utility and the prospective employee and a strong focus and much time devoted to keeping good employees on board But how do you attract worthy candidates to the profession Lou Di Gironimo detailed Toronto Water s innovative hiring program whereby engineers are hired out of high school and perform four different job roles in four years The engineer then chooses which job of the four they would like to pursue an attractive proposition for uncertain young professionals and a successful approach for Toronto San Jose sees the recent need for a new generation of workers as an opportunity to invest in the future focusing on graduating high schoolers to fill the void while training them quickly A new training curriculum was developed and modern tools such as software programs and iPads were purchased in order to hasten and improve the training process Romanow s vision for the future is one where the water utility is cool and hip like Google and Tesla where people will be banging down our door to work for us What are the drivers for resource recovery and what criteria are you using to evaluate different solutions Hawkins

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/on-water-leaders-address-key-industry-challenges-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • Latest Insights On Consumer Outreach Documents on Water Online
    projects are hard to come by in public works So when it comes to stormwater the community relies on the combined efforts from an ensemble cast of characters to help prevent pollution as seen on StormTV Joining The Fight Against Flushables 1 27 2016 The flushables scourge has cost utilities all over the world millions of dollars and countless hours of maintenance Some groups are attacking the problem at its source Utilities Under Fire Why Rate Hikes Are A Scary Proposition 12 7 2015 A true story and disturbing image of rate increase resistance from the front lines What Happens When Conservation Leaves Revenue Short 11 23 2015 Citing a 380 million need for infrastructure improvements and treatment costs the LADWP Commissioners approved a pass throsource water scarcityugh charge of 1 80 more a month for the average consumer to begin next year and last until 2017 Jersey Strong A Q A With Public Utility Commissioner Mary Anna Holden 10 29 2015 Commissioner Mary Anna Holden has been on the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities since 2012 As a mayor and councilwoman of Madison NJ for 14 years Holden chaired the water and wastewater utilities 5 On 5 Water Leaders Address Key Industry Challenges 10 13 2015 At a recent panel event five of the top utility professionals in North America tackled five hot topics in water and wastewater Boston Water s Revenue Protection Division To Protect And Serve 9 14 2015 Non revenue drinking water is usually the result of leakage and spills caused by worn or neglected infrastructure On the mean streets of Boston a revenue loss task force grapples with these challenges plus the threat posed by enterprising criminals Beat The Heat How To Fight Fire Hydrant Abuse 7 15 2015 To overheated summer residents they

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/hub/bucket/latest-insights-on-consumer-outreach (2016-02-14)
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  • The Impact Of VigorOx WWT II Wastewater Disinfection Technology On Endocrine Disruptors
    Petroleum Refining Produced Water Power Generation Water Reuse Utility Management AMR AMI and Metering Asset Management Consumer Outreach Funding Labor Resiliency SCADA Automation Source Water All Source Water Contamination Desalination Water Scarcity Water Reuse Regulations and Legislation Providers YSI a Xylem brand Hach Company Schneider Electric Neptune Technology Group Inc Evoqua Water Technologies Veolia Water Solutions Technologies ABB Measurement Products Aclara Jacobi Carbons Endress Hauser Inc KROHNE Inc Kaeser Compressors Inc Emerson Process Management Rosemount Analytical Degremont Technologies Brentwood Industries View All Providers Article June 1 2015 The Impact Of VigorOx WWT II Wastewater Disinfection Technology On Endocrine Disruptors Contact The Supplier Endocrine disruptors EDs are a class of chemicals with the ability to interfere with the endocrine hormonal processes in mammals Any hormonal process in the body can potentially be impacted by endocrine disruptors As a result EDs have been linked to many health related issues such as learning disabilities brain and cognitive development problems breast cancer deformations of limbs feminizing of males and masculinizing of females prostate and other cancers Unlike Toxins the impact of EDs on health is not typically short term and long term effects may be drastic Newsletter Signup SIGN ME UP YOU MAY ALSO

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/the-impact-of-vigorox-wwt-ii-wastewater-disinfection-technology-on-endocrine-disruptors-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • Submersible Sewage Pump Type ABS AFP M8-M9 Datasheet
    Water Power Generation Water Reuse Utility Management AMR AMI and Metering Asset Management Consumer Outreach Funding Labor Resiliency SCADA Automation Source Water All Source Water Contamination Desalination Water Scarcity Water Reuse Regulations and Legislation Providers YSI a Xylem brand Hach Company Schneider Electric Neptune Technology Group Inc Evoqua Water Technologies Veolia Water Solutions Technologies ABB Measurement Products Aclara Jacobi Carbons Endress Hauser Inc KROHNE Inc Kaeser Compressors Inc Emerson Process Management Rosemount Analytical Degremont Technologies Brentwood Industries View All Providers Datasheet March 25 2015 Submersible Sewage Pump Type ABS AFP M8 M9 Datasheet Source Sulzer Pumps Solutions Inc Submersible sewage pump type ABS AFP are suitable for clear and wastewater for sewage with sludge containing solids and fibrous material Construction The water tight fully flood proof motor and the pump section form a compact and robust unit Water pressure sealed connection chamber with two stage cable entry protected against excessive cable tension and bending Water pressure sealed motor insulation class H with bimetallic temperature monitors in the stator Rotor and rotor shaft dynamically balanced upper and lower bearings lubricated for life maintenance free Blockage free cooling system Cooled by the medium Double shaft sealing Lower sealing by means of a silicon carbide mechanical seal independent of the direction of rotation Upper mechanical seal carbon chrome steel independant of direction of rotation Oil chamber with seal monitor sensor to indicate water leakage through mechanical seal Hydraulic parts with open or closed 3 channel or 5 channel impeller These pumps are available both in standard and explosion proof versions in accordance with international standards e g explosion proof in accordance with NEC 500 for Class I Division 1 Groups C and D in hazardous classified locations Sulzer Pumps Solutions Inc Contact The Supplier Contact Details Company Profile MORE FROM Sulzer Pumps Solutions

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/submersible-sewage-pump-type-abs-datasheet-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • How The Industry Can Take On Wipes In The Waste Stream And Win Part Three
    All Source Water Contamination Desalination Water Scarcity Water Reuse Regulations and Legislation Providers YSI a Xylem brand Hach Company Schneider Electric Neptune Technology Group Inc Evoqua Water Technologies Veolia Water Solutions Technologies ABB Measurement Products Aclara Jacobi Carbons Endress Hauser Inc KROHNE Inc Kaeser Compressors Inc Emerson Process Management Rosemount Analytical Degremont Technologies Brentwood Industries View All Providers Article September 23 2015 How The Industry Can Take On Wipes In The Waste Stream And Win Part 3 This is the final installment of a three part series examining wipes in the waste stream The first and second installments looked at the growth of consumer wipes usage within the last decade and the public outreach campaigns and changes in pumps targeted at helping keep wipes at bay This last article will examine the debris reduction products available to fully combat non dispersible wipes within pump stations and resource recovery facilities As outlined in earlier articles increasing public awareness or even seeking legal action are potential tools to help municipalities gain control of the wipes problem However many agencies have seen that these strategies are not completely effective in the long term and they must also employ new technologies within their pump

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/how-the-industry-can-take-on-wipes-in-the-waste-stream-and-win-part-three-0001 (2016-02-14)
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