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  • Resiliency Documents on Water Online
    planning for and protecting against catastrophic events These seven emerging trends forecast how the water industry will cope 3 Game Changers For Water And Wastewater 2 1 2016 Three key events from 2015 could reshape the water wastewater industry in 2016 and for years to come Leading The Re Charge How The SFPUC Is Protecting San Francisco Bay Area Groundwater 2 1 2016 The Hetch Hetchy Regional Water System is vulnerable to both drought and earthquakes but innovative resiliency efforts by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission SFPUC will keep the water flowing Bold 2016 Predictions For Industrial IoT 1 11 2016 FreeWave Technologies sees the Internet of Things pushing the bounds of possibility disrupting traditional business models The Chicago Way Windy City Water Boss Addresses Top Threats Solutions 1 5 2016 In many ways Chicago is a tough act to follow a world class city of both great renown and infamy The latter may engender thoughts of mobsters and political machinations but when it comes to water the Chicago way is a model of achievement and leadership to be admired Climate Change Ramifications For The Water Industry 12 22 2015 Climate change isn t going away not in the literal sense not in public discourse and probably not as a point of contention While the big picture initiative arising from COP21 was to halt global warming at 1 5 C there are many smaller more personal but no less important initiatives being taken on by water and wastewater professionals Source Water Protection There s An App For That 12 21 2015 In Oregon a mobile toolkit helps promote healthy ecosystems and protect community drinking water Consultant s Corner Top 5 Requirements for Good Modeling 12 17 2015 Dr Jon Wicks CH2M s Global Technology Leader for flood risk modeling

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/hub/bucket/resiliency (2016-02-14)
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  • Major Storm Events Play Key Role In Biogeochemistry Of Watersheds
    combines hydrologic and biogeochemical theory to test well established concepts in watershed ecology The paper published in the journal Ecology suggests that heavy weather events though infrequent cause an inordinate amount of organic material to bypass headwater systems pushing them downstream into larger rivers coastal waters and inland basins This phenomenon can have profound ecological implications on the quality of water systems worldwide and the chemical processes that occur within them Dissolved organic matter a complex mix of compounds that leeches into waterways and gives rivers and streams their color introduces nutrients and pollutants influences the escape of carbon dioxide from the water and can impact the amount of light that penetrates the water That in turn can affect levels of phytoplankton a major food source for many organisms Researchers have long believed that organic materials are naturally processed by organisms in the first order streams the smaller streams at the headwaters of a river network headstream waters creating new compounds that are in turn processed by organisms farther downstream with the process occurring throughout the system The process is known as the River Continuum Concept But the new paper underscores that this process does not account for the importance of heavy weather events which trigger pulses of organic matter into waterways As the authors explain these events also push or shunt this organic matter past the headwaters before there is time for those reactions to occur since they also accelerate the velocity of the water flow They term this theory the pulse shunt concept We predict that a lot of this organic matter is actually shunted past the small streams and the reactions occur in the larger rivers or even in the coastal ocean said Peter Raymond a professor of ecosystem ecology at the Yale School of Forestry Environmental Studies F ES and lead author of the study We also offer a new conceptual theory for watershed biogeochemistry that demonstrates this through first principles and is transferrable to other watersheds and other nutrients Previous research has estimated that about 60 percent of the transported DOM from terrestrial landscapes to waterways occurs during 15 days including days of heavy rain or snow melt Because the concentration of material transport increases with the size of the event the total flux off the landscape is greatest when you have a few large events as opposed to several smaller events Raymond said However the shunt that occurs during these large events also reduces the amount of material that is removed within the smaller streams and rivers So there is this double additive effect that exports more of these organic materials to coastal waters The researchers say that shifts in the transport of DOM could potentially impact mercury inputs to inland waters and the Sound dissolved oxygen concentrations and water clarity The paper was co authored by James Saiers the Clifton R Musser Professor of Hydrology at F ES and William Sobczak from the College of the Holy Cross Part of the work was

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/major-storm-events-play-key-role-biogeochemistry-watersheds-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • Winds Of Change For 26-Tonne Trent Tidal Gate Replacement Project
    and commissioning ECS has completed several projects previously at this site that have involved the refurbishment of the counter balance and of the winding gear located above the sluice gate The timing of the project was planned for a time of year when flooding was least likely to occur so that the brief period between the removal of the old gate and the installation of the new gate would not pose any flood risk to the local area One of the major logistical issues was getting a crane on site that was large enough to lift the 26 tonne sluice gate especially with restricted local access The answer came from a local crane hire company that managed to position a 120 tonne mobile crane on site and then rig it with 76 tonnes of ballast to give the crane a rated capacity of 220 tonnes With the calculations done all that was needed was a calm day to allow the old gate to be removed With all the electrical services removed the top platform of the sluice gate which contains the lifting winches and the control gear was removed to allow access to the sluice gate itself The lifting operation required almost perfect weather conditions due to the weight of the sluice gate and its tendency to act like a sail in the lightest wind The project included the replacement of the steel ropes and the gate runners which guide the sluice gate into position during normal operation It also involved a specialist dive team to install two limpet cofferdams which allowed the engineers to remove and replace the gate running tracks under dry conditions Due to the size of the replacement sluice gate it was transported to site in sections and then assembled ready for the crane to return and complete the installation With only a minor adjustment the new gate was craned into position and secured before the top platform was replaced and bolted in place With the main structure reassembled the new wire ropes and all of the electrical services were reconnected including the encoders which are used to control the position of the sluice gate Having completed the rebuild the engineers commissioned the sluice gate to ensure that all of the controls and settings were correct and then finished tidying the site and returning it to the Environment Agency The sluice is located close to residential properties and following the previous project ECS was commended on its sympathetic working practices that kept any disturbance of the residents to a minimum ECS endeavoured to maintain this good will during the project to replace the existing sluice gate which involved some extended working hours Clark Williamson Engineering Director at ECS comments ECS has developed a successful working relationship with the EA and this project is one of many that demonstrates the scale of work that can be involved With our new 50 000 sq ft fabrication facility we have the capacity to ensure a variety of projects can

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/winds-change-tonne-trent-tidal-gate-replacement-project-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • HUD Awards 1B Through National Disaster Resilience Competition
    recovery needs and innovative solutions The strategic partnership between the Rockefeller Foundation and HUD drew on the successful strategies of the Rebuild by Design competition where the Foundation provided lead support for administration of the competition and community engagement Awardee Summaries State of California The State of California will receive 70 359 459 in NDRC funding to pilot its Community and Watershed Resilience Program in Tuolumne County which was severely affected by the 2013 wildfires The Watershed Resilience Program will focus on supporting forest and watershed health developing a bioenergy and wood products facility and a community resilience center which will create a long term economically and environmentally sustainable program that can be replicated throughout the state State of Connecticut The State of Connecticut will receive 54 277 359 in NDRC funding to support a pilot program in Bridgeport that is part of the State s broader Connecticut Connections Coastal Resilience Plan The Coastal Resilience Plan is focused on reconnecting and protecting economically isolated coastal neighborhoods through investments in mixed green and gray infrastructure that protect against flooding while strengthening their connectivity to existing transportation nodes State of Iowa The State of Iowa will receive 96 887 177 in NDRC funding to support the Iowa Watershed Approach a holistic watershed scale program designed to sustain its valuable agricultural economy while protecting vulnerable residents and communities HUD funding will enable several watersheds to form Watershed Management Authorities which will develop hydrological assessment and watershed plans and implement pilot projects in the upper and lower watersheds as well as invest in more resilient healthy homes in Dubuque State of Louisiana The State of Louisiana will receive 92 629 249 in NDRC funding to support its Louisiana Strategic Adaptations for Future Environments Program LA SAFE LA SAFE seeks to protect coastal wetlands in and around southeast Louisiana retrofit communities to withstand increased flooding risk and reshape high ground areas to maximize their use and safety The NDRC funds will also enable a tribal community on the Isle de Jean Charles which has experienced a 98 percent loss of land to 1955 to relocate to a resilient and historically contextual community City of Minot ND The City of Minot will receive 74 340 770 in NDRC funding to support its integrated approach to addressing climate change and recent upstream development that has increased the risk of frequent flooding The City is launching a set of three integrated projects that will reduce flood risk and improve water management build affordable and resilient neighborhoods connected to transit and job centers and foster economic resilience through the creation of Centers for Technical Education State of New Jersey The State of New Jersey will receive 15 000 000 in NDRC funding to support the creation of a Regional Resiliency Planning Grant Program that will help regions and communities that experience significant flooding to undergo a comprehensive planning process to identify and address vulnerabilities due to increased flooding risk and for work with university partners to develop a toolkit

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/hud-awards-b-through-national-disaster-resilience-competition-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • More Walls More Warming Less Water A World At Risk In 2016
    small number of key risks wielding great influence All five of the most interconnected pairs of risks in 2016 accounted for more interconnections than in 2015 At the top end of the scale 2016 s two most interconnected risks profound social instabilityand structural unemployment or under employment account for 5 of all interconnections Knowledge of such interconnections is important in helping leaders prioritize areas for action as well as to plan for contingencies We know climate change is exacerbating other risks such as migration and security but these are by no means the only interconnections that are rapidly evolving to impact societies often in unpredictable ways Mitigation measures against such risks are important but adaptation is vital said Margareta Drzeniek Hanouz Head of the Global Competitiveness and Risks World Economic Forum Which panic button to press Environmental risks have come to prominence in the global risks landscape in 2016 despite the presence on the horizon of a large number of other highly visible risks Income disparity which was highlighted by the report in 2014 is this year reflected in the growing interconnections involving profound social instability and both structural unemployment and underemployment and adverse consequences of technological advances Events such as Europe s refugee crisis and terrorist attacks have raised global political instability to its highest level since the Cold War This is widening the backdrop of uncertainty against which international firms will increasingly be forced to make their strategic decisions The need for business leaders to consider the implications of these risks on their firm s footprint reputation and supply chain has never been more pressing said John Drzik President Global Risk and Specialties Marsh Geopolitical risks one of which interstate conflict with regional consequences was 2015 s most likely risk are also present while interstate conflict has dropped to fourth in terms of likelihood weapons of mass destruction ranks as the second most impactful risk one place higher than last year and its highest ranking ever in our report Climate change is exacerbating more risks than ever before in terms of water crises food shortages constrained economic growth weaker societal cohesion and increased security risks Meanwhile geopolitical instability is exposing businesses to cancelled projects revoked licenses interrupted production damaged assets and restricted movement of funds across borders These political conflicts are in turn making the challenge of climate change all the more insurmountable reducing the potential for political co operation as well as diverting resource innovation and time away from climate change resilience and prevention said Cecilia Reyes Chief Risk Officer of Zurich Insurance Group One potential black swan event could be in the area of technological risk While cyberattacks rises slightly in terms of likelihood and impact in 2016 others including failure of critical information infrastructure appear to be declining as a risk in the eyes of experts Technological crises have yet to impact economies or securities in a systemic way but the risk still remains high something that potentially may not have been fully priced in

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/more-walls-more-warming-less-water-a-world-at-risk-in-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • DC Water Roleplays Extensive Contamination Drill
    signs that petroleum has contaminated the water supply The scenario was purely theoretical but the large conference room at D C Water s Bryant Street Pumping Station in Northwest Washington began buzzing with questions TheWashington Post reported For D C Water the contamination drill is just one strategy for crisis prep at a utility known for its forward thinking policies When Jonathan Reeves was hired six years ago D C Water was among the first utilities to hire a full time emergency prep manager As Reeves put it We protect the water for the center of the free world We are held to higher standards The recent contamination drill when a step further than previous planning discussions This is the next step Reeves said per the report You actually do something to see if it works The exercise represented the most far reaching emergency drill he said the utility has conducted to practice responding to a drinking water crisis in the nation s capital TheWashington Post got an inside look at the contamination drill which was sponsored by the U S EPA During the scenario Jason Hughes played the role of incident commander He directed the group to come up with a detailed incident action plan Determine how and where to collect water samples get the samples tested draft a message to the media and notify critical customers such as hospitals and schools the report said Some water utilities have been slow to prioritize emergency response Utility industry experts say many water and sewer agencies have taken a while it s been 14 years since the Sept 11 terrorist attacks to expand their core missions from supplying safe water and sewage disposal to anticipating a large scale extended water outage be it from a terrorist attack a hurricane or a

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/d-c-water-roleplays-extensive-contamination-drill-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • Climate Change An 'Opportunity' For Utilities Analyst Says
    management researcher at Cranfield University s School of Energy Environment and Agrifood in the U K says that such uncertainty ought not to be the basis for delayed decisions according to Bloomberg BNA Let s be bolder about what we know instead of being paralyzed about what we don t know Even with imperfect data utilities can take steps to prepare according to Pollard Pollard said even without a clear baseline understanding of how climate affects their operations water utilities can assess measured risks using plausible scenarios for a wide range of situations to adapt their facilities and build more resilient organizations Bloomberg BNA reported He called climate change a disruptive opportunity for utilities noting that improvements to water system resilience benefit water companies Resilience in the water sector will come from a fusion of innovation risk management and foresight he said Bloomberg BNA reported Communicating with customers about climate change is important according to Edward Maibach a professor and director of the Center for Climate Change Communication at George Mason University in Virginia Explaining the need for system upgrades may help prepare them for higher bills he said Show them the kind of challenges you re dealing with in your water system he said per the report And make it vivid Customers need to know that climate change is happening here today it s not a distant threat Maibach said Bloomberg BNA reported Many water utilities do not rate climate change as a priority When executives at U S water utilities were asked about the biggest anxiety for their industry only about 10 percent said that climate change which could further reduce water supplies in already water stressed regions was a significant sustainability issue Greentech Media reported citing a new analysis by the consultancy Black Veatch Water utilities may

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/climate-change-an-opportunity-for-utilities-analyst-says-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • Paris Bolsters Water Security After Terrorist Attacks
    protect water facilities in Paris Authorities feared the possibility of a chemical attack by Islamic State terrorists Scientists were carrying out tests on the city s water supply the Daily Mail reported on November 21 Paris Water President Célia Blauel confirmed that water samples were being analysed and six vital sites were under armed guard Blauel explained the approach Checks are continuing she said According to the report she added that the chlorine in the water had been increased to limit the risk of contamination The water is always chlorinated for health reasons but the dose has been raised When the chlorine level drops it means there is biological contamination she said per the report The chlorine level is controlled throughout the network This allows us if necessary to precisely isolate the affected area without disrupting the entire network Experts say other water networks may be vulnerable as well according to the report British chemical expert John Large said the UK was very vulnerable to an attack on its water systems adding Either by injecting a toxin into a pipe system or by putting a large quantity of a toxic into a reservoir the terrorists could pose a major threat These possibilities are not new Water utilities have had security concerns on their radar for decades Policy expert and Pacific Institute co founder Peter Gleick explained the water utility perspective in a research paper There is a long history of water related violence and conflicts including what must be categorized as environmental terrorism targeting water resources and infrastructure The threat of future attacks is real and the plans for responding to such attacks appear to be inadequate The actual risks of serious human health consequences are less clear given the complex nature of our developed water systems protections already put

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/paris-bolsters-water-security-after-terrorist-attacks-0001 (2016-02-14)
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