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  • Retofit Significantly Reduces Backwash Cycle Interval Duration And Water Use For Georgia Utility
    Petroleum Refining All Petroleum Refining Produced Water Power Generation Water Reuse Utility Management AMR AMI and Metering Asset Management Consumer Outreach Funding Labor Resiliency SCADA Automation Source Water All Source Water Contamination Desalination Water Scarcity Water Reuse Regulations and Legislation Providers YSI a Xylem brand Hach Company Schneider Electric Neptune Technology Group Inc Evoqua Water Technologies Veolia Water Solutions Technologies ABB Measurement Products Aclara Jacobi Carbons Endress Hauser Inc KROHNE Inc Kaeser Compressors Inc Emerson Process Management Rosemount Analytical Degremont Technologies Brentwood Industries View All Providers Case Study July 17 2015 Retrofit Significantly Reduces Backwash Cycle Interval Duration And Water Use For Georgia Utility Source Leopold A Xylem Brand The North Columbus Resource Facility recently completed a 12 million replacement of its settled water filtration removing the existing Wheeler filters their three part media and 10 inch poured concrete underdrains which were no longer efficient Read the full case study to learn how a Leopold filter system helped save the plant approximately 1 000 000 gallons of water per day that was previously used for backwash purposes Leopold A Xylem Brand Contact The Supplier Contact Details Company Profile MORE FROM Leopold A Xylem Brand Contact Details Company Name Leopold A

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/retrofit-significantly-reduces-backwash-cycle-interval-duration-and-water-use-for-georgia-utility-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • Biological Drinking Water Treatment Microbiological Considerations For The Operation And Control Of Biofilters
    and electron donors usually added exogenously The reductive removal of these contaminants can occur in various system configurations including fixed beds e g BAC fluidized beds and membrane systems and is usually followed by an aeration step in order to facilitate the removal of excess BDOC AOC caused for instance by the upstream addition of organic compounds as electron donors Beside the use of organic electron donors the addition of inorganics such as hydrogen gas or elemental sulfur have been described for the reductive treatment of these contaminants Irrespective of the biofilter configuration or process followed the filter s biomass resides primarily in biofilms a complex microbiological community in which microorganisms are encased and immobilized in a self secreted matrix of hydrated extracellular polymeric substances EPS In itself and by allowing the accumulation and use of environmental organic and inorganic molecules by the resident microbial community this matrix is a source of nutrients carbon nitrogen phosphorous etc for their microbial residents The EPS matrix that can have depths of several tens or hundreds of micrometers behaves as a physical barrier for antimicrobials or as an ion exchange media for mineral precipitation and accumulation of toxic metals In this regard chlorine concentration profile gradients obtained as a function of biofilm depth shows a sigmoidal shape where the inflection point is located at the biofilm surface indicating a decrease in chlorine concentration as a function of the matrix depth Despite biofilms can be formed by single microbial species in most natural or artificial systems they are composed by mixed species consortia of either a restricted group of microorganisms even though a few species can be numerically and or functionally dominant or by groups of phylogenetically highly diverse microorganisms As the microbial cells adapt to grow within biofilms they express phenotypic traits that are often distinct from those that are expressed during planktonic or free living growth Depending on the species of bacteria these phenotypic differences can be manifested as variations in colony morphology under culture conditions intrinsic resistance of released cells to antimicrobials disinfectants or antibiotics modified rate for the consumption of organic or inorganic compounds facilitated horizontal gene transfer etc Biofilm development has three distinct stages 1 attachment of cells to a surface 2 growth of the cells into a sessile biofilm community and 3 detachment of mass of cells from the community into the surrounding medium The surface attachments of bacterial cells involves an initial weak reversible interaction between a bacterial cell and the corresponding surface that is later reinforced by the strong and irreversible adhesion mediated by cellular components located on the bacterial cell surface or on cellular appendages such as pili and fimbriae The second stage of biofilm development involves the multiplication of bacteria on the surface and the concomitant synthesis of an extracellular polymeric matrix As mentioned before the matrix holds the bacterial cells together in the EPS mass and firmly attaches the bacterial community to the underlying surface Biofilm detachment and the consequent microbial dispersal can

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/biological-drinking-water-treatment-microbiological-considerations-for-the-operation-and-control-of-biofilters-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • Desalination Serves Coastal Argentine City
    Pumps and Valves Sewers and Sewer Line Maintenance Stormwater Regulations and Legislation Industrial Food Beverage Petroleum Refining All Petroleum Refining Produced Water Power Generation Water Reuse Utility Management AMR AMI and Metering Asset Management Consumer Outreach Funding Labor Resiliency SCADA Automation Source Water All Source Water Contamination Desalination Water Scarcity Water Reuse Regulations and Legislation Providers YSI a Xylem brand Hach Company Schneider Electric Neptune Technology Group Inc Evoqua Water Technologies Veolia Water Solutions Technologies ABB Measurement Products Aclara Jacobi Carbons Endress Hauser Inc KROHNE Inc Kaeser Compressors Inc Emerson Process Management Rosemount Analytical Degremont Technologies Brentwood Industries View All Providers Case Study June 30 2015 Desalination Serves Coastal Argentine City Source RWL Water When a series of water crises in 2014 disrupted conventional utility services in the coastal Argentine city of Caleta Olivia the city needed a way to ensure an uninterrupted water supply The federal government looked to RWL Water for the expertise to create a reverse osmosis desalination facility to deliver fresh drinking water to the public RWL Water Contact The Supplier Contact Details Company Profile MORE FROM RWL Water Contact Details Company Name RWL Water Address 767 Fifth Avenue Suite 4200 New York NY 10153 US

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/desalination-serves-coastal-argentine-city-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • Municipal Drinking Water Facility Installs UV System To Deactivate Cryptosporidium And Giardia
    Refining Produced Water Power Generation Water Reuse Utility Management AMR AMI and Metering Asset Management Consumer Outreach Funding Labor Resiliency SCADA Automation Source Water All Source Water Contamination Desalination Water Scarcity Water Reuse Regulations and Legislation Providers YSI a Xylem brand Hach Company Schneider Electric Neptune Technology Group Inc Evoqua Water Technologies Veolia Water Solutions Technologies ABB Measurement Products Aclara Jacobi Carbons Endress Hauser Inc KROHNE Inc Kaeser Compressors Inc Emerson Process Management Rosemount Analytical Degremont Technologies Brentwood Industries View All Providers Case Study November 18 2014 Municipal Drinking Water Facility Installs UV System To Deactivate Cryptosporidium And Giardia Source Neptune Benson The City of Berea public water system provides service to approximately 20 000 people using surface water drawn from the East Branch of the Rocky River however supplies can also be drawn from nearby Coe Lake and Baldwin Creek as needed As open surface water sources they are vulnerable to run off and other forms of contamination The City mandates the best possible water quality for its residents and had been closely monitoring the quality of the water source In 2008 Cryptosporidium was detected in 10 of the 24 samples collected from the East Branch of the Rocky River Download this case study to see why the Service Director for the City of Berea said We ve been impressed so far with the quality of manufacturing of the ETS machines their respon siveness and particularly their knowledgeable technical staff It is important that we maintain the highest quality water from our facility and the ETS UV system will supplement our conventional disinfection process Our facility is a state of the art water treatment facility and we are proud to disinfect water using UV light to get disinfection credits for deactivating Cryptosporidium Newsletter Signup SIGN ME UP YOU MAY

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/municipal-drinking-water-facility-installs-uv-system-to-deactivate-cryptosporidium-and-giardia-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • UV Eliminates Cryptosporidium Issues In The Heartland
    Food Beverage Petroleum Refining All Petroleum Refining Produced Water Power Generation Water Reuse Utility Management AMR AMI and Metering Asset Management Consumer Outreach Funding Labor Resiliency SCADA Automation Source Water All Source Water Contamination Desalination Water Scarcity Water Reuse Regulations and Legislation Providers YSI a Xylem brand Hach Company Schneider Electric Neptune Technology Group Inc Evoqua Water Technologies Veolia Water Solutions Technologies ABB Measurement Products Aclara Jacobi Carbons Endress Hauser Inc KROHNE Inc Kaeser Compressors Inc Emerson Process Management Rosemount Analytical Degremont Technologies Brentwood Industries View All Providers Case Study May 19 2014 UV Eliminates Cryptosporidium Issues In The Heartland Source Neptune Benson The City of Moline is now adding validated UV systems to provide an additional barrier for the filtered water which will improve water quality and ensure that none of the chlorine tolerant organisms such as Cryptosporidium is present The City of Moline is located in the heart of the Midwest tucked between the banks of the Mississippi and Rock River in Rock Island Moline is one of four cities that make up the Quad Cities that include Rock Island Illinois and Bettendorf and Davenport Iowa Newsletter Signup SIGN ME UP YOU MAY ALSO LIKE Contact Details Company

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/uv-eliminates-cryptosporidium-issues-in-the-heartland-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • Arsenic Removal Technologies A Review
    equipment and materials suppliers are available Reducing pH to the 5 to 7 range can enhance AM effectiveness Figure 2 Titanium dioxide adsorption vessel at the Alta UT drinking water plant Iron based AM is regarded as the industry standard for arsenic removal It is estimated that 80 percent of utilities that remove arsenic from drinking water do so with adsorptive media with 80 percent of the operating cost due to media replacement Water Online 2014 AM systems are provided by companies such as Severn Trent Siemens AdEdge Technologies Pureflow Filtration and BioteQ Table 1 details an extensive list of media evaluated recently for arsenic removal Table 1 Comparison of Arsenic Removal Sorbents Source Chen et al 2010 Water Research Foundation The ion exchange IX process differs from the AM process in that IX media is meant to be regenerated periodically and reused after arsenic adsorption IX media is typically regenerated with sodium hydroxide and sodium chloride which creates a liquid waste containing a high concentration of arsenic Since waste disposal may be problematic IX is not typically used for arsenic removal Figure 3 IX vessel for arsenic removal at the Buckhorn Mountain Mine water treatment plant Republic WA Many studies have been conducted on the effects of different water quality parameters on the most widely used arsenic treatment processes as seen in Table 2 Odell and Perry 2013 Table 2 Effects of Water Quality Biological Treatment Technologies The ABMet process originally developed by Applied Biosciences of Salt Lake City UT now part of GE Water uses biological sulfate reduction to precipitate arsenic and heavy metals Nitrate selenium and mercury may also be removed in the process An organic nutrient is continuously added to feed the bacteria Biological systems for arsenic removal require a relatively long residence time such as 4 to 8 hours This system requires little maintenance with the nutrient comprising most of the operating cost ABMet has been installed at several locations in North America and Europe treating flows up to 2 million gallons per day MGD This biological process has been successful with both high TDS 35 000 mg L and low temperature 4 o C waters The THIOTEQ Scorodite process has been developed by PAQUES a Dutch company for removing arsenic from water through biological formation of bioscorodite FeAsO 4 2 H 2 O Bacteria oxidize iron and available arsenic to ferric iron and arsenate An in situ bio oxidation process using air produces bioscorodite which is reportedly highly stable The process has been used with arsenic concentrations greater than 1 000 mg L and is currently being pilot tested PAQUES claims these advantages of THIOTEQ Scorodite over chemical processes for arsenic removal Air is used as an oxidant High temperature is not required The iron dose and solid waste volume are less than in ferric arsenate processes Bioscorodite is more stable than scorodite produced from conventional processes Emerging Treatment Technologies Several innovative arsenic removal technologies or variations of existing technologies have been developed over

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/arsenic-removal-technologies-a-review-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • Reservoir Overcomes Toxic Algae Issue
    Maintenance Stormwater Regulations and Legislation Industrial Food Beverage Petroleum Refining All Petroleum Refining Produced Water Power Generation Water Reuse Utility Management AMR AMI and Metering Asset Management Consumer Outreach Funding Labor Resiliency SCADA Automation Source Water All Source Water Contamination Desalination Water Scarcity Water Reuse Regulations and Legislation Providers YSI a Xylem brand Hach Company Schneider Electric Neptune Technology Group Inc Evoqua Water Technologies Veolia Water Solutions Technologies ABB Measurement Products Aclara Jacobi Carbons Endress Hauser Inc KROHNE Inc Kaeser Compressors Inc Emerson Process Management Rosemount Analytical Degremont Technologies Brentwood Industries View All Providers Case Study June 16 2015 Reservoir Overcomes Toxic Algae Issue Source Lonza A Nebraska reservoir was experiencing toxic algae in its water Constructed by the U S Army Corps of Engineers COE primarily as a flood control reservoir with recreation and irrigation as secondary uses the reservoir has a surface area of 700 acres with an average depth of almost 12 feet A laboratory study Algal Challenge Test was performed with the desired outcome of controlling Microcystis aeruginosa and microcystin production to permit recreational access The study was to measure the responses chlorophyll a concentration cell density and microcystin production of M aeruginosa from the reservoir to selected algaecide exposures in the laboratory Further responses chlorophyll a concentration cell density and microcystin production of M aeruginosa from the reservoir to an algaecide exposure in the field were measured Learn how the use of the water was restored once a compare and contrast of the laboratory and field results was completed Image credit Cranberry Lake algae bloom 2014 EcologyWA 2014 used under an Attribution ShareAlike 2 0 Generic license https creativecommons org licenses by sa 2 0 Lonza Contact The Supplier Contact Details Company Profile MORE FROM Lonza Contact Details Company Name Lonza Address 1200 Bluegrass Lakes

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/reservoir-overcomes-toxic-algae-issue-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • Bring On The Bacteria Conventional Treatment Methods Not Enough To Produce Safe Drinking Water
    growth in RO membranes photo provided by Hans Peterson What is missing It is the lack of recognition by regulatory agencies around the world that any raw water source is a smorgasbord for bacteria There are the compounds that are easy for bacteria to use like reduced gases including hydrogen sulphide methane etc and then there are inorganic compounds such as ammonium manganese and arsenic Bacteria can oxidize these compounds moving them from a reduced state to an oxidized state while they gain energy in the process There are also organic compounds in the water that bacteria can use These are called bioavailable organics and they are typically a small part of the total dissolved organics but the constant supply of bioavailable organics carried by the raw water through the water treatment plant can create havoc even when the levels are small Again bacteria use these compounds and oxidize them to gain energy The above creates biological instability of even the best treated drinking water meeting all international guidelines regulations This biological instability is also the biggest cause for loss of chlorine residuals in the distribution system Regrowth of coliforms in the distribution system is also stimulated by all the compounds that bacteria can use either as nutrient or energy sources This smorgasbord problem cannot be solved with physics and chemistry Biology is required Coagulation and filtration has not got a chance and even tight RO membranes cannot entirely resolve biological instability RO membranes are gas permeable and direct RO treatment of groundwater sources often end up with unpleasant smells of the RO permeate That is not surprising as anaerobic well waters often contain hydrogen sulphide rotten egg smell and other foul smelling gases as well as gases that don t smell methane for example These gases have one thing in common they are ice cream to bacteria Another compound that is not removed properly by direct RO of groundwater is arsenic as reduced arsenic As3 is not rejected well even by the tightest RO As long as we supply ice cream steak French fries and Greek salads to the bacteria we will continue to fail to produce safe drinking water even if we meet every regulation in the book And we will continue to make life for water treatment plant operators miserable as they do not have the right tools to fight this battle It is a bit like trying to use a tea strainer to take out espresso ground coffee It cannot be done What is the solution We have a simple choice We can either grow bacteria in the water treatment plant or we will grow them in the treated water reservoirs and the distribution system If membranes are used the bacteria will grow in the membranes whether the water is aerobic or anaerobic The only difference is that anaerobic bacteria will grow under conditions of no oxygen while aerobic bacteria will grow if oxygen is present A regulator may think of bacteria as hetertrophic plate count

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/bring-on-the-bacteria-conventional-treatment-methods-not-enough-to-produce-safe-drinking-water-0001 (2016-02-14)
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