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  • Lead and Copper Rule Reboot Flint’s Failures Prompt Revisions
    Following a bout with disinfection byproducts last year water consumers have since been exposed to lead and copper contamination Such issues draw plenty of attention striking right at the heart of the value of water and the public outcry that arises when the water supply is compromised And while the water industry is continually trying to head off problems before they escalate into public health crises sometimes the solution is reactive rather than proactive High profile failures and dangerous repercussions tend to get results and this time will likely prompt changes to a major rule for drinking water systems On Nov 18 Rep Dan Kildee D MI testified before the U S EPA s National Drinking Water Advisory Council NDWAC calling for revisions to the federal Lead and Copper Rule LCR that in hindsight might have prevented the Flint contamination event Flint changed its drinking water source from Lake Huron to the Flint River in April 2014 and the chemical composition of the new source accelerated corrosion in the pipeline thus releasing lead into the distribution system Kildee a Flint native spoke in support of recommendations made by the Lead and Copper Rule Working Group LCRWG to add specific protocols and fail safes to the existing LCR that would protect other communities from some of what Flint has had to endure The NDWAC agreed and approved the recommendations as part of its own advisory to the EPA for long term LCR revisions Here are the new stipulations detailed in the Report of the Lead and Copper Rule Working Group to the National Drinking Water Advisory Council Require proactive lead service line LSL replacement programs which set replacement goals effectively engage customers in implementing those goals and provide improved access to information about LSLs in place of current requirements in which LSLs must be replaced only after a lead action level AL exceedance Establish more robust public education requirements for lead and LSLs by updating the Consumer Confidence Report CCR adding targeted outreach to consumers with LSLs and other vulnerable populations pregnant women and families with infants and young children and increasing the information available to the public Strengthen corrosion control treatment CCT retaining the current rule requirements to re assess CCT if changes to source water or treatment are planned adding a requirement to review updates to EPA guidance to determine if new scientific information warrants changes Modify monitoring requirements to provide for consumer requested tap samples for lead and to utilize results of tap samples for lead to inform consumer action to reduce the risks in their homes to inform the appropriate public health agency when results are above a designated household action level and to assess the effectiveness of CCT and or other reasons for elevated lead results Tailor water quality parameters WQPs to the specific CCT plan for each system and increase the frequency of WQP monitoring for process control Establish a health based household action level that triggers a report to the consumer and to the

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/lead-and-copper-rule-reboot-flint-s-failures-prompt-revisions-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • Carrying Out The EPA’s Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
    EPA s Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule LT2 was instituted to combat the presence of disease causing microorganisms namely Cryptosporidium in drinking water Cryptosporidium is known to cause gastrointestinal illness that may prove severe in the young or elderly and may prove fatal in those with immune systems weakened by prevailing disease Its presence became a particular concern for the EPA as recent data indicated that high risk systems still harbored the chlorine resistant microorganism despite traditional treatment A quick perusal of the EPA s LT2 basic information website will answer the most fundamental questions about the rule It applies to all public water systems that use surface water about 14 000 nationwide Systems have been expected to monitor their water sources to determine treatment requirements taking regularly scheduled samples and submitting them to the EPA to determine the presence of Cryptosporidium For the largest systems this monitoring began in 2006 and for smaller systems in 2008 A second round has been initiated this year Per an EPA webinar from July 30 2015 which has since been taken offline the second round s monitoring start dates are staggered based on size Systems serving at least 100 000 consumers had to begin their second round of monitoring no later than April 2015 Those serving fewer than 50 000 have until October of 2016 to begin monitoring If your system serves 10 000 or more you re expected to submit monthly samples over two years If a system serves fewer than 10 000 it can choose to sample once every two weeks for one year instead of once a month over two years To reduce costs these small systems will first monitor for Escherichia coli E coli and if it proves prevalent move on to test for Cryptosporidium The second round of E coli monitoring is scheduled to begin in October of 2017 There are special conditions in place for systems that don t have their own surface water source or operate seasonally Compositing or averaging samples is permitted for plants with multiple sources of influent Systems have been required to report their sampling schedules and locations before the start of this second round of monitoring After it starts they must provide the monitoring results and six months after its completion a calculation of what bin or treatment category they fall in The EPA expects most systems to find themselves in the lowest bin the occupants of which will face no additional treatment requirements Those in the higher bins designated as such because their samples indicated high levels of contaminants will have to provide additional treatment Laboratories that test the samples for Cryptosporidium are required to do so using EPA Methods 1622 1623 or 1623 1 all of which use similar processes Samples are required to be 10 L or as much water as can be filtered through two filters before filters clog in size A video overview of the EPA s Cryptosporidium and Giardia detection methods can be

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/carrying-out-the-epa-s-long-term-enhanced-surface-water-treatment-rule-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • Prepare To Pump Up Efficiency
    a Pump Efficiency Index PEI the DOE estimates savings of up to 1 1 billion in net energy bill reductions and 30 billion kilowatt hours of electricity over 30 years of sales To devise an appropriate PEI the DOE formed a working group of manufacturers efficiency advocates pump users and utilities The process was initiated in 2013 and the working group successfully reached a consensus on June 19 of last year Manufacturer Impact Meg Waltner Manager for Building Energy Policy at the Natural Resources Defense Council and a member of the NOPR working group reported that if the final proposed rule is adopted 25 percent of pumps currently available would be removed from the marketplace All of the pumps covered in the rule are used to pump clean water she told Water Online Typical uses include agricultural irrigation building heating and cooling systems and water treatment plants The 20 outlined equipment classes to be affected by the rule include vertical turbine submersible end suction radial split vertical and inline pumps While 80 percent of the energy consumed in water treatment plants is from pumping energy few significant types of pumps have been specifically excluded from this initial rulemaking said working group member Greg Towsely former director of Regulatory and Technical Affairs at Grundfos North America a pump manufacturer Once a rule is passed manufacturers will have to determine which of their pump models fail to meet the new standards They can then choose to upgrade those models with improved hydraulics or technology or to discontinue them in favor of more energy efficient products The DOE has taken steps to consult manufacturers throughout this process presumably to avoid lambasting them with sudden restrictions and Towsley predicts those that have taken heed will be at a distinct advantage over competitors I believe that those manufacturers that have products that meet the standards before the effective date will have an advantage in the market as the end users increase their understanding of the benefits of this regulation to them in energy savings he said Opportunity To Improve A new rule won t prohibit the use of inefficient pumps just their sale on the market Utilities won t be forced to upgrade but introduction of the new standards offers them the chance to improve efficiency and save on a leading expense In advance of the ruling Towsley recommends that utilities complete a pumping system assessment to determine performance and energy consumption and then compare their pumps to the scope found in the final rule If they find that their pumps are not compliant with the DOE standards this will indicate the chance to upgrade to something more efficient The proposed standards also include certification and labeling requirements which will allow pump users to more easily identify the most efficient pumps said Joanna Mauer a working group member from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project Stay Posted The DOE was accepting comments data and information from the public up until June 1 With that period closed

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/prepare-to-pump-up-efficiency-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • Views on the Latest Regulations Documents on Water Online
    others falls on equipment manufacturers those who make pumps Cool Tool The Drinking Water Treatability Database 12 17 2015 Name a contaminant any contaminant and chances are that the U S EPA s new reference tool has you covered or at least soon will The recently revamped Drinking Water Treatability Database is set to include more than 200 contaminants with detailed information on what they are where they come from and how to get rid of them Lead and Copper Rule Reboot Flint s Failures Prompt Revisions 11 24 2015 The federal Lead and Copper Rule LCR is destined for changes attributable to hard times in Flint MI and the agreement from an EPA advisory council that lessons must be learned from the latest crisis Carrying Out The EPA s Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule 9 24 2015 For nearly a decade public utilities that draw from surface waters have been contending with a developing regulation that is emblematic of the U S EPA and the systems under its charge Arsenic Update Top Technologies Revealed 8 27 2015 The federal regulation for arsenic has been in place since 2002 and yet many utilities remain noncompliant The culprit isn t treatment capability but cost It happens that the most popular treatment technique is also quite expensive but it doesn t have to be Prepare To Pump Up Efficiency 6 30 2015 The U S Department of Energy DOE has proposed its first ever energy standards for commercial and industrial pumps aimed at saving energy in the agricultural and municipal clean water sectors EPA Fails 6 Subjects 6 17 2015 Like so many schoolchildren sweating out final grades the U S EPA gets its own report card each year served by the EPA Office of Inspector General OIG Unfortunately

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/hub/bucket/drinking-water-regulation-original-content (2016-02-14)
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  • SCU Trace Metals Removal Media Removes Heavy Metals For Battery Manufacturer Discharge Compliance
    All Petroleum Refining Produced Water Power Generation Water Reuse Utility Management AMR AMI and Metering Asset Management Consumer Outreach Funding Labor Resiliency SCADA Automation Source Water All Source Water Contamination Desalination Water Scarcity Water Reuse Regulations and Legislation Providers YSI a Xylem brand Hach Company Schneider Electric Neptune Technology Group Inc Evoqua Water Technologies Veolia Water Solutions Technologies ABB Measurement Products Aclara Jacobi Carbons Endress Hauser Inc KROHNE Inc Kaeser Compressors Inc Emerson Process Management Rosemount Analytical Degremont Technologies Brentwood Industries View All Providers Case Study October 21 2015 SCU Trace Metals Removal Media Removes Heavy Metals For Battery Manufacturer Discharge Compliance Source Evoqua Water Technologies In June 2011 Evoqua was contacted by a manufacturer of battery equipment for electric lift trucks The systems are routinely used at many large food processing facilities in Texas The plant was experiencing difficulty in meeting wastewater discharge requirements of heavy metals specifically copper molybdenum and zinc The facility faced fines and the potential suspension of their discharge permit to the city municipal waste water treatment facility The suspension would have resulted in additional off site disposal costs Evoqua Water Technologies Contact The Supplier Contact Details Company Profile MORE FROM Evoqua Water Technologies Contact

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/scu-trace-metals-removal-media-removes-heavy-metals-for-battery-manufacturer-discharge-compliance-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • Chloramination Monitoring And Control
    Asset Management Consumer Outreach Funding Labor Resiliency SCADA Automation Source Water All Source Water Contamination Desalination Water Scarcity Water Reuse Regulations and Legislation Providers YSI a Xylem brand Hach Company Schneider Electric Neptune Technology Group Inc Evoqua Water Technologies Veolia Water Solutions Technologies ABB Measurement Products Aclara Jacobi Carbons Endress Hauser Inc KROHNE Inc Kaeser Compressors Inc Emerson Process Management Rosemount Analytical Degremont Technologies Brentwood Industries View All Providers White Paper July 15 2015 Chloramination Monitoring And Control Source Swan Analytical USA By Randy Turner Technical Director Chemist Swan Analytical USA Since the EPA has established that together with free chlorine monochloramine is a primary disinfectant it has been possible to implement the process more intensively Water that is treated with monochloramine has depending on the source of the water fewer problems concerning taste and odor than water treated with free chlorine In addition the chemically more stable monochloramine remains longer in the water thus allowing a long term disinfecting effect However the monitoring of the process and the measuring techniques are much more complex The reason is that the additional dosage of ammonia can produce more by products or there is a possibility of over ammoniating Swan Analytical USA

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/chloramination-monitoring-and-control-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • The Design For Autonomous Net-Zero Water Buildings Project Funded By NSF
    Sewer Line Maintenance Stormwater Regulations and Legislation Industrial Food Beverage Petroleum Refining All Petroleum Refining Produced Water Power Generation Water Reuse Utility Management AMR AMI and Metering Asset Management Consumer Outreach Funding Labor Resiliency SCADA Automation Source Water All Source Water Contamination Desalination Water Scarcity Water Reuse Regulations and Legislation Providers YSI a Xylem brand Hach Company Schneider Electric Neptune Technology Group Inc Evoqua Water Technologies Veolia Water Solutions Technologies ABB Measurement Products Aclara Jacobi Carbons Endress Hauser Inc KROHNE Inc Kaeser Compressors Inc Emerson Process Management Rosemount Analytical Degremont Technologies Brentwood Industries View All Providers Article August 24 2015 The Design For Autonomous Net Zero Water Buildings Project Funded By NSF The students at the University of Miami will know firsthand the importance of rethinking the way we handle wastewater and water with a Net Zero water treatment system on site The project showed the viability and feasibility to take buildings off the water grid to provide water recycling and how it can be achieved without raising the cost of high quality water The research team behind this Autonomous Net Zero Water Project designed and built a 4 bedroom dorm located a special interest floor of Eaton Residential College on the University of Miami Campus Dr James Englehardt principal investigator for the project described one of the project s main goals to be able to do this for a single stand alone building decentralized with a low energy and low emission water reuse treatment system The engineering techniques used in this eco friendly project allows many functions of water monitoring water quality control and operation maintenance of wastewater and water treatment systems Bio Microbics Inc Contact The Supplier Contact Details Company Profile MORE FROM Bio Microbics Inc Contact Details Company Name Bio Microbics Inc Address 8450 Cole Parkway Shawnee

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/the-design-for-autonomous-net-zero-water-buildings-project-funded-by-nsf-0001 (2016-02-14)
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  • ETS-UV Project Profile Industrial Dairy Process Water
    Source Water All Source Water Contamination Desalination Water Scarcity Water Reuse Regulations and Legislation Providers YSI a Xylem brand Hach Company Schneider Electric Neptune Technology Group Inc Evoqua Water Technologies Veolia Water Solutions Technologies ABB Measurement Products Aclara Jacobi Carbons Endress Hauser Inc KROHNE Inc Kaeser Compressors Inc Emerson Process Management Rosemount Analytical Degremont Technologies Brentwood Industries View All Providers Case Study January 17 2016 ETS UV Project Profile Industrial Dairy Process Water Source Neptune Benson Our client is a 120 year old Grade A dairy foods processor located in the Midwest They pride themselves by providing the highest level of quality and care to produce cheese sauces dairy drinks and diet shakes The company is a pioneer in aseptic processes and is constantly investing time and money into researching the best ways to achieve sterility while keeping the fresh taste of their product Water used in food or beverage processing either for product or as part of the process must be treated in order to ensure the integrity of the end product Microbial control within the dairy industry is critical for the control of pathogens and spoilage organisms Advances in the understanding of UV disinfection has now led to

    Original URL path: http://www.wateronline.com/doc/ets-uv-project-profile-industrial-dairy-process-water-0001 (2016-02-14)
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