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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Kurtz Trucking is recognized for safety record
    was judged to be the best in its commitment to improving safety It doesn t come from one person the whole team won this award from office staff to the drivers Trevor Kurtz said The company will be recognized a second time during TCA s Safety and Security Division annual meeting May 15 to 17 in Murfreesboro Tennessee In 2009 the Brian Kurtz Trucking s insurance carrier audited its safety program and ranked the company against other insured carriers as well as industry best practices It awarded Brian Kurtz Trucking with the highest score ever recorded for a first time participant In 2010 the company tied with another carrier for the highest score of any of the insurance company s customer carriers For the past two years Brian Kurtz Trucking also was named a TCA Best Fleet to Drive For For more information visit www kurtztrucking com or www truckload org Vol 44 Issue 13 Tweet Tell Us What You Think Login to submit a comment Comments appearing on this website are the opinion of the comment writer and do not represent the opinion of the Wellington Advertiser Comments that attack other individuals or are offensive unsubstantiated or otherwise inappropriate will be removed You must register or log in in order to post a comment For more information read our detailed Comment Policy and Guidelines Related Stories Carly Campbell Cooper did well in horse competition in Peru Heading to Hawaii Matt Ward aims to conquer Ironman World Championship Cox Creek Cellars Estate Winery A toast to the good life in Wellington County Kurtz Trucking is recognized for safety record Thatcher Farms All local food is all natural with the Thatchers Brian Kurtz Trucking Local family business enjoying success accolades From Thomas the Tank to Nscale empires Model trains continue to

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=8462 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Thatcher Farms: All local food is all natural with the Thatchers
    Dana offering a tour of the spotless modern cutting house built by Adam complete with a walk in freezer and a separate area with confectionery ovens and room for baking and canning We have lots of plans for the store as a result of this place It was a dream of ours Now we are a part of the food production process every step of the way We grow the feed our animals eat We feed and care for the livestock who have a good quality of life here and we are a part of the lambing season and all that entails Adam does the trucking to our small local abattoir in Drayton and then the carcasses are returned to our farm where we have the cutting and packaging done here We can feel good about how our animals are treated and the high standards of sanitization in the final product she said It adds so much value to our finished product An important part of that pride comes with the respect for the skill of their hired butcher William Merrit He has worked for three generations of Dana s family Adam explained He was an apprentice with Dana s grandfather in his grocery store then worked for Dana s uncle and now he works with us The confidence in that relationship is more than just quality control It s rare to do it all and it is a lot of work to be a part of everything said Dana who shares the farm work and raising of their two young children with her husband while on leave from her elementary teaching career We work together and share all the jobs These are hard times right now because it s just the two of us It takes a lot of time and effort but we re both devoted to it On Saturday mornings people will find Dana at the Guelph Farmer s Market where she loves the atmosphere of her fellow farmers and their customers People come up to me and ask good questions about how we raise our animals and our farm I think people like to meet the person behind the food they re eating She enjoys the opportunity to connect with her customers too It s not about big purchases so much as it is about conscious choices and for Dana the pride in her work is in knowing another family benefits from her labour They know my name and they call me their farmer I love knowing people are in their kitchens cooking food with our label on it and they ve connected with us in some way These people recognize how important what we do is and that means something to me That s why the farm gate sales are important It gives families a chance to get out of their cars and see the property meet Adam and Dana Thatcher and get a sense of where their food is grown It s about educating

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=8326 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Brian Kurtz Trucking: Local family business enjoying success, accolades
    and on weekends washing trucks loading goods and doing other odd jobs In 1995 the four sons bought into the business and a decade later they made more significant investments in the company Brian Kurtz Trucking continued to evolve and expand at the turn of the century Many local customers realized the value of service and on time deliveries and switched to Kurtz said Trevor In early 2000 the company had about 55 trucks and racked up about 8 000 000km per year The company had always strived to meet the latest operational safety and environmental standards but after the terrorist attacks on Sept 11 2001 things became much more onerous Since 9 11 things have totally changed in our industry said Trevor He explained new strict regulations for cross border transport forced some companies out of business but the Kurtz company has managed to thrive thanks to its attention to detail and a measured investment in meeting any and all necessary qualifications And that dedication has paid off with many industry awards and accolades both before and after 2001 In 1997 the company won a safety award from the Transportation Safety Association In 2005 it received the Canadian Driver Retention Award and in 2006 the Carrier of Excellence Gold Award The company received a 4 8 out of five rating from its insurance provider in 2009 which Brian explained is the highest score anyone has ever received We re proud of our achievements Trevor added The company also prides itself on being a member of the local community Brian relayed the story of how in 1992 the business volunteered to ship a lot of relief goods collected by local church groups to the Florida area after Hurricane Andrew a category 5 storm caused 26 5 billion in damage in the southern U S Trevor noted the company also provided refrigerated trailers to the University of Guelph local pharmaceutical companies factories and the residents of Guelph to keep food and drugs at the correct temperature during the infamous power outage in the summer of 2003 But perhaps the most impressive achievement of all came last month when the company was named the safest fleet in North America for 2010 in the Division II 5 to 14 9 million miles category by the Truckload Carriers Association s TCA That s for North America which is pretty awesome Trevor said The TCA s Annual National Fleet Safety Awards recognize trucking companies that demonstrate a superior commitment to safety and accident reduction Safety has always been the top priority in this industry TCA developed these awards 36 years ago to recognize the top performers said Don Lacy chairman of TCA s safety and security division has stated Today receiving a National Fleet Safety Award has become a highly coveted badge of honor that recognizes and rewards companies for working tirelessly to improve their procedures in the safety arena Last year Brian Kurtz Trucking did not have any reportable accidents in the U S

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=8062 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - From Thomas the Tank to Nscale empires: Model trains continue to enthral
    depicting southern Ontario in the late 1950s located on the east side of Brock Road at the south end of Aberfoyle is hosting its pre Christmas show this weekend Dec 4 and 5 from 10 am to 4 30pm for more information visit www aberfoylejunction com Gwen Bard of Guelph is a partner in the Aberfoyle Junction operation She said the display is only open about 14 days a year for its spring fall and pre Christmas shows She explained a group of friends led by Frank Dubery started the operation in 1973 at the Aberfoyle market before opening to the public at its current location in 1982 Currently seven individuals are involved with Aberfoyle Junction which features steam engines built from scratch by Bard s husband Charles who quickly joined Dubery almost 40 years ago due to his love of trains Gwen said the display particularly the night scene remains popular with seniors and families Seniors come for nostalgic reasons because it s set in the 1950s she said And families bring in small children in large part because of an interest in Thomas the Tank Engine she added Despite Fletcher s optimism Bard shares Watson s concern that the collective face of model railroaders is aging Not so many young people are getting into the hobby anymore she said We find that kind of distressful you can learn so many skills through it But groups and clubs in the county remain dedicated to both retaining current members and recruiting new ones There s a lot of sharing and camaraderie within and among the groups Watson said The message I want to get out there is model railroaders are still around and there are people here more than willing to help Such assistance is especially crucial for beginners he explained who can become frustrated when something doesn t work properly and there s no one to help Then it s gone he said If novice enthusiasts are kept informed and engaged the hobby has a much better chance of sticking Watson explained This is one hobby where a mentor is practically required he said Many see our hobby as big kids playing with toy trains but to many of us it is an art form From painting backgrounds to constructing layouts buildings and geographic or other features to working on mechanical and electrical details there s always something to do it seems And that s before even operating guiding a train between various locations and picking up and dropping off certain cars along the way which can test one s puzzle solving skills Once hooked like the Watsons the hobby can almost take on a life of its own occupying a lot of time and requiring a significant financial investment You can build an empire that never ends he said The layouts are an ongoing work in progress You re never happy In fact George still tinkers with his HO scale Bear Mountain Southern Pacific railroad which he started

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=7667 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Nestle Waters donates recycling bins to new recreational building
    very effective form of recycling in our community John Zupo president of Nestlé Waters Canada said a number of employees call Guelph Eramosa home and thus we are very proud to be associated with this community Royal Distributing Athletic Performance Centre is a unique facility in this part of the province and that stature is further enhanced by the establishment of what we know to be a very effective public spaces recycling program Public spaces recycling involves the collection of recyclable materials including plastic beverage containers in public spaces such as sports parks arenas cultural facilities streetscapes transit stops schools convenience stores gas stations and bars and restaurants According to facts compiled by independent environmental consultant StewardEdge from the provincial stewards responsible the recovery rate for plastic beverage containers was about 66 across Canada last year Plastic beverage containers represent less than 1 5th of 1 of the waste stream Bottled water packaging represents 40 of that figure Vol 43 Issue 49 Tweet Tell Us What You Think Login to submit a comment Comments appearing on this website are the opinion of the comment writer and do not represent the opinion of the Wellington Advertiser Comments that attack other individuals or are offensive unsubstantiated or otherwise inappropriate will be removed You must register or log in in order to post a comment For more information read our detailed Comment Policy and Guidelines Related Stories Carly Campbell Cooper did well in horse competition in Peru Heading to Hawaii Matt Ward aims to conquer Ironman World Championship Cox Creek Cellars Estate Winery A toast to the good life in Wellington County Kurtz Trucking is recognized for safety record Thatcher Farms All local food is all natural with the Thatchers Brian Kurtz Trucking Local family business enjoying success accolades From Thomas the Tank

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=7658 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - ELECTIONS 2010: Ross-Zuj, Foster clash again over borrowing
    council and staff will have to work together to decide what services can be cut in order to meet future challenges When asked by one of the 40 or so residents in attendance for clarification on the issue Foster stressed he has no problem with the two projects he knows they re necessary I m opposed to borrowing the money he said noting with loans comes interest which then has to be recovered through higher sewage bills While he offered no funding solution of his own Foster added the township was turned down three times for grants for the sewage upgrade he thinks that is because officials decided to go with a Cadillac solution costing over 16 million It s very difficult to find the technology that is needed for sewage treatment plants on sale Ross Zuj countered She said a whole panel of experts including officials with the township and environmental and engineering firms very carefully review the costs and the provincial government has also approved the direction the township has picked We have no choice it has to be done she said of the sewage project It is cost recoverable it is not something that we already put onto our debt When asked what exactly she meant by cost recoverable Foster interjected and said it means it will be added to water and sewer bills No it is not Ross Zuj said sternly It is in development charges It is completely growth related Foster replied if development charges will be used to pay back the loan it will compromise all the other things the township has to do Vol 43 Issue 41 Tweet Tell Us What You Think Login to submit a comment Comments appearing on this website are the opinion of the comment writer and do not

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=7208 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Township approves last of tenders for Marden Park development plan
    been sneaking up past expectations He noted the township had about 70 000 shaved off the price of the building s septic system which now comes with an overall price tag of 331 942 Milne also said the active communities campaign has raised about 440 000 About the project Phase one of the Marden Park development includes an outdoor football field with lighting and a 56 000 square foot steel structure that will house an indoor sports field with artificial turf an indoor track and a multi functional board room The original estimate for the project was just under 6 2 million two thirds of which was funded by the provincial and federal governments The township was issued a debenture for its portion of 2 066 000 The debenture was issued with a 4 361 interest rate for a 10 year term based on a 20 year amortization with a large payment in the tenth year In the 2010 budget upon completion of preliminary stud ies and a building design the township added 350 000 from the parks and recreation development charges reserve fund raising the overall budget for the project to 6 55 million Indoor facility Thanks to a 250 000 donation from Royal Distributing the indoor facility will be known as the Royal Dis tri buting Performance and Ac tivity Centre Naming rights apply to just the indoor facility and the name will be for the life of the building Officials expect the new building will cater to the 3 325 township residents under the age of 18 although Milne stressed great efforts have been made in the design to accommodate all age groups The township has also signed a rental agreement with the Ontario Football Alliance OFA The five year lease for a 471 square foot administration office commences on Sept 1 and will generate 484 35 per month in rent for the municipality The price will rise each year at a rate equal to inflation About 70 of prime time availability at the facility 5 to 11pm on weekdays and all day on the weekends is already booked from October to March Milne said it is difficult to know how many locals are included in those bookings be cause most are booked by leagues themselves However I can say Rockwood FC has a lot of time slots booked Milne said Information on booking availability and rates is available at www get on ca Vol 43 Issue 33 Tweet Tell Us What You Think Login to submit a comment Comments appearing on this website are the opinion of the comment writer and do not represent the opinion of the Wellington Advertiser Comments that attack other individuals or are offensive unsubstantiated or otherwise inappropriate will be removed You must register or log in in order to post a comment For more information read our detailed Comment Policy and Guidelines Related Stories Carly Campbell Cooper did well in horse competition in Peru Heading to Hawaii Matt Ward aims to

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=6731 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Rob Black heads new organization touted as the 'unified voice' for rural Ontarians
    Hannam vice chairman of the ROI board said members expect the new or ganization will help rural residents acquire the skills and confidence they need to become active in their community Anyone who has a passion for rural Ontario should get involved said Hannam The decision to locate the ROI headquarters in the Gencor building on Highway 6 north of Guelph was an easy one Black said noting the office is the right size in a great location in Wellington County and where several stakeholders are also located It s a perfect fit Black said White also the chairman of the Rural Ontario Municipal Association called the ROI grand opening on June 1 a very historic day for this province He noted within two weeks of its inception Progressive Conservative leader Tim Hudak had contacted the ROI to discuss issues This is a must have for Ontario There s nothing else like this White said Rural Ontario needs a more unified voice Working with individuals and municipalities Norman Ragetlie director of policy and stakeholder engagement explained the ROI tries to help rural residents articulate their concerns and bring their voice to the corridors of government on myriad issues including the controversial Green Energy Act The organization can also help with issues like loans and organize forums and discussions he added And the ROI works closely with municipalities as well The municipal sector is going to be a key stakeholder for sure Ragetlie said The programs Project manager Alicia Evans who oversees the Steps to Leadership program a collaborative project between ROI 4 H Ontario and the Foun dation for Rural Living said youths emerging leaders and established leaders at least 16 years of age are all welcome in the program It s really about trying to engage people in their community Evans said Currently in its second year Steps to Leadership involves three separate programs which Evans stressed do not involve a huge time commitment She said organizers try to keep registration fees low and the information as accessible and local as possible The three components of the Steps to Leadership program are the Step Up to Leadership workshop Lead ing Edge First Steps and Leading Edge Next Steps The Leading Edge Sum mit offered to graduates of the program as well as next generation and current rural leaders offers the opportunity to network with community organization and business leaders from across Ontario AALP Kathie MacDonald communications manager and coordinator of the Advanced Agricultural Leadership Pro gram AALP said ROI staff are pumped about the recent amalgamation It s an exciting time MacDonald said Now in its 25th year the AALP has produced graduates with backgrounds ranging from farmers to business owners to politicians They re current and emerging leaders already involved in some form or another in their community Black explained There have been 13 classes offered every other year 353 alumni and each class consists of about 30 people and takes 48 days total to complete eight three

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=6342 (2016-02-16)
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