archive-com.com » COM » W » WELLINGTONADVERTISER.COM

Total: 1157

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • The Wellington Advertiser - Elliott best choice as leader
    her work on all Party Select Committees of the Legislature that she pushed to establish These committees engaged in exhaustive consultations and developed thoughtful recommendations on addictions and mental health and later on improving developmental services in Ontario She showed her compassion her sense of responsibility that we all have to those less fortunate and she showed her heart In a recent speech she summarized her political philosophy stating Good economic policy enables good social policy And fiscal responsibility and social compassion can and must go hand in hand That to me is what it means to be a Progressive Conservative All of us in provincial politics need to show Ontarians that we are listening that we understand their concerns and that we are speaking for them in the Legislature They need to see that we are worthy of their trust and that we have the best ideas to lead this province back to greatness To be effective in the House we need to be sensible credible and truthful And for our party to succeed in the next election we must be able to effectively reach out to voters across the province not only rural and small town Ontario but also urban Ontario and the GTA We will need to show that we have lived we have learned and we are ready to govern again Christine Elliott is respected and her integrity and ability have been proven She wants to move Ontario forward while working with everyone and in doing so make our province stronger and more prosperous She is the leader that Ontario needs Wellington Halton Hills MPP Ted Arnott welcomes comments He can be reached at 1 800 265 2366 His website address is www tedarnottmpp com Vol 48 Issue 07 Tweet Tell Us What You Think Login to submit a comment Comments appearing on this website are the opinion of the comment writer and do not represent the opinion of the Wellington Advertiser Comments that attack other individuals or are offensive unsubstantiated or otherwise inappropriate will be removed You must register or log in in order to post a comment For more information read our detailed Comment Policy and Guidelines COLUMNISTS Barrie Hopkins Bruce Whitestone Kelly Waterhouse Recent Columns Bits and Pieces The Bailey Bridge Cold colder and coldest Frosty Friday January thaw Frosty Friday Silent and symbiotic Winter wonderland Double surprise Canada s Business Presumptuous Left out Negative trends Left out Responsibility Bad Omens A precarious economy Troubled economy Comment from Ottawa The new session The Reform Act Services for seniors Small businesses Anti terrorism bill is needed Terrorism Helping families Veterans Life wise Retirement Canadas scarcity of calamity Often we mirror our parents Putting up with put downs A tale of two landlords A letter from the campsite Two shades of black Precious memories Queen s Park Report Merry Christmas Firefighters bill good news Reform Act Groves pits Celebrating 150 years Bad budget Elliott best choice as leader Just another day at the office Merry

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/columns.cfm?articleID=1000001644 (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive


  • The Wellington Advertiser - 'Just another day at the office'
    the government s smart meters program has cost nearly 2 billion Under the initiative the Auditor General wrote ratepayers were supposed to use less electricity during peak times But what actually happened Peak demand reduction targets set by the Ministry of Energy have not been met ratepayers have had significant billing concerns and ratepayers are also paying significantly more to support the expansion of power generating capacity while also covering the cost of the implementation of smart metering the Auditor General concluded In short the smart meters have been a failure and the money spent on them has been wasted To be fair we are paying for the smart meters on our electricity bills which is separate from the Ontario Government s Consolidated Revenue Fund But it s still public money and subject to review by the Auditor General In our parliamentary system of government if 2 billion of public money is wasted you d expect that a cabinet minister would accept responsibility for the boondoggle and resign To put 2 billion into perspective it would easily pay for several new bridges and road improvements along the Connecting Link roadways in Halton Hills and Centre Wellington a new court house in Halton a brand new hospital in Centre Wellington the Highway 6 Morriston bypass traffic signals in Guelph Eramosa and a sewage treatment system in Erin with hundreds of millions of dollars to spare But of course no one took responsibility for the waste of 2 billion and resigned their cabinet seat That s just not the way the Wynne government works To them it s just another day at the office Wellington Halton Hills MPP Ted Arnott can be reached at 1 800 265 2366 His website is tedarnottmpp com Vol 48 Issue 03 Tweet Tell Us What You Think Login to submit a comment Comments appearing on this website are the opinion of the comment writer and do not represent the opinion of the Wellington Advertiser Comments that attack other individuals or are offensive unsubstantiated or otherwise inappropriate will be removed You must register or log in in order to post a comment For more information read our detailed Comment Policy and Guidelines COLUMNISTS Barrie Hopkins Bruce Whitestone Kelly Waterhouse Recent Columns Bits and Pieces The Bailey Bridge Cold colder and coldest Frosty Friday January thaw Frosty Friday Silent and symbiotic Winter wonderland Double surprise Canada s Business Presumptuous Left out Negative trends Left out Responsibility Bad Omens A precarious economy Troubled economy Comment from Ottawa The new session The Reform Act Services for seniors Small businesses Anti terrorism bill is needed Terrorism Helping families Veterans Life wise Retirement Canadas scarcity of calamity Often we mirror our parents Putting up with put downs A tale of two landlords A letter from the campsite Two shades of black Precious memories Queen s Park Report Merry Christmas Firefighters bill good news Reform Act Groves pits Celebrating 150 years Bad budget Elliott best choice as leader Just another day at the

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/columns.cfm?articleID=1000001626 (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Wellington Advertiser - Merry Christmas
    Standing Committee on Finance and Economic Affairs will be holding pre budget public hearings from Jan 20 to 30 and is expected to travel to Fort Frances Sudbury Ottawa Cornwall Fort Erie and London The committee will also have hearings in Toronto as well as accept written submissions After the hearings are concluded the committee writes a report including recommendations for the Minister of Finance for his upcoming provincial budget These public consultations are an important part of the budget process and I would encourage interested constituents to avail themselves of the opportunity to participate For more information visit www ontla on ca Wellington Halton Hills MPP Ted Arnott welcomes comments call 1 800 265 2366 His website address is www tedarnottmpp com Vol 47 Issue 51 Tweet Tell Us What You Think Login to submit a comment Comments appearing on this website are the opinion of the comment writer and do not represent the opinion of the Wellington Advertiser Comments that attack other individuals or are offensive unsubstantiated or otherwise inappropriate will be removed You must register or log in in order to post a comment For more information read our detailed Comment Policy and Guidelines COLUMNISTS Barrie Hopkins Bruce Whitestone Kelly Waterhouse Recent Columns Bits and Pieces The Bailey Bridge Cold colder and coldest Frosty Friday January thaw Frosty Friday Silent and symbiotic Winter wonderland Double surprise Canada s Business Presumptuous Left out Negative trends Left out Responsibility Bad Omens A precarious economy Troubled economy Comment from Ottawa The new session The Reform Act Services for seniors Small businesses Anti terrorism bill is needed Terrorism Helping families Veterans Life wise Retirement Canadas scarcity of calamity Often we mirror our parents Putting up with put downs A tale of two landlords A letter from the campsite Two shades of

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/columns.cfm?articleID=1000001608 (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Wellington Advertiser - Death of JFK changed the world
    America was well away from that happy year The civil rights movement was exploding A number of historians say Kennedy just managed to catch on to its importance in his final year in office and he nearly missed it altogether But Kennedy gave people something few have been able to do He offered hope and dreams We need men who can dream of things that never were he said in a speech in Ireland five months before he died He said it would take hard work and sacrifice but people adopted his attitude of a New Frontier Here is one of his comments The problems of the world cannot possibly be solved by skeptics or cynics whose horizons are limited by the obvious realities He also had wit a biting sense of humour He joked he made his younger brother Bobby Attorney General because he needed a job He said after a few days in office When we got into office the thing that surprised me the most was that things were as bad as we d been saying they were As for his war record he answered a reporter s question about being a hero by saying It was involuntary They sank my boat His self deprecating sense of humour made Kennedy more a man of the people than a politician But as the poet of that age Bob Dylan noted then The times they are a changing Indeed while the decade of the 1960s was one of change many historians count its beginning with the shots heard Nov 22 1963 in Dallas and ending with the resignation of Nixon on Aug 8 1974 It was an era that saw music and fashion changed utterly war resistance in Vietnam the hippy movement the belief people should make love not war and the beginning of the drug culture as a normal part of American life even as it was illegal and governments began a war on drugs It was a time of excitement and hope for a better future Kennedy s wife Jacqueline coined the term Camelot to describe what she believed was her husband s legacy For certain there were very few critics of the Kennedy presidency for many years Today of course we are aware of his human faults from morals similar to those of Slick Willie Clinton to the very real possibility he might have lost the 1964 election Still he ranks among the most popular of American s presidents Since his death there have been numerous conspiracy theories about who was involved in his assassination did Oswald act alone etc He has been criticized for accelerating the Vietnam War his belated civil rights record and his vote buying tactics credited with inspiring Nixon s 1972 political dirty tricks because he had learned from Kennedy s win that was how things were done in the presidential race For a man in office less than a complete term his attitude made changes for many of us but it

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/columns.cfm?articleID=1000001364 (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Wellington Advertiser - Final lines: Its been great
    publisher Bill Adsett and editor Dave Adsett Bill hired me as a rock and roll columnist in the 1980s when I started freelancing Dave had lots of plans for the Wellington Advertiser when he hired me in 1996 after the Elora Sentinel died We worked laughed plotted discussed and debated possibilities and I believe the Advertiser is very close now to what he envisioned it could be 16 years ago But things change It is time for new people to take the load The Advertiser will continue to evolve and that is necessary with more focus on new media but always with a view to keeping readers informed Dave and I agree newspapers were important years ago and will continue to be a force in the community The web sites and electronic media trends that have come and gone over the past decade are ample proof of new technology s struggles to get established Finally I thank my colleagues in the newsroom for putting up with my rants and loud voice all these years In the old days everyone yelled because of the clatter of typewriters I never learned to lower my tone I have worked and joked with many great people and can say the staff Dave has assembled here is tops The newsroom even tolerates my hatred of exclamation marks always a sign of bad writing in news copy All the newsrooms I have worked in are reminiscent of a M A S H Unit where we laugh and joke often to keep from crying It has been a pleasure working for and with so many great people over the years and in particularly Chris Daponte Mike Robinson and cubicle neighbour Kelly Waterhouse The past few months have been hectic My wife Anna whom I first met covering a public zoning meeting where else has been offered a job in Chatham and been living there during the week As this issue hits the street we expect the purchase of our new home will be done I will retire sort of but the kids and I will be here until Hellene s and Matt s baseball season is done in August Then it is off to start a new life In the past month I have felt like I won the lottery I wish everyone well and farewell We will visit home here and we are hoping friends travelling west will drop by To complete the transition from pen to typewriter to computer I have asked permission to use the old sign off that for years told the editor the story had come to an end as this part of my life has Old time reporters and editors will instantly recognize it 30 Vol 45 Issue 26 Tweet Tell Us What You Think Login to submit a comment Comments appearing on this website are the opinion of the comment writer and do not represent the opinion of the Wellington Advertiser Comments that attack other individuals or are offensive unsubstantiated

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/columns.cfm?articleID=1034 (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Wellington Advertiser - Tanner’s woolen mill in Mount Forest burned twice in a year
    George Tanner told reporters that his loss was in the neighbourhood of 12 000 well in excess of one million in today s money Despite the fire in 1875 he carried only 3 800 of insurance on the factory and its contents Very likely more than that would have been prohibitively expensive The winter of 1876 77 was a poor time for business especially for wool and that had led Tanner to limit the inventory he had on hand As well it was the normal quiet period for the industry Farmers did not clip their sheep until spring and the plant would not be inundated with wool until April and May At a busy time Tanner s loss would have been much greater More disturbing than the fire itself was the strong suspicion that it had been set deliberately by a fire bug The timing of the fire itself was strange it broke out on a Saturday evening when no one was working in the building no lamps were burning and the boiler was not lit Prior to the discovery of the fire a neighbour saw a man running away from the plant The man kept running when the neighbour shouted at him to stop and he disappeared into the night The next morning a small group of men traced his steps which they followed upstream as far as the Murphy s flour mill that once stood on the north shore of the river beside the bridge that is now the site of the Highway 6 bridge The suspect could not get onto the bank because water was coming from the flume of the mill The man reversed his path and climbed up the bank on the south side of the river They lost his trail on the roadway An examination of the ruins revealed that the fire seemed to have been started underneath the office The building was constructed on posts to secure an elevation that was above the flood level of the river The area under the building open It was there that a fire had been started That removed any doubt that the blaze had been set deliberately The guilty party had the same advantage as all criminals in small towns in the 19th century law enforcement was virtually non existent Mount Forest had a night watchman but he had little knowledge training or experience in criminal matters His prime function was to patrol the main street and deal with the numerous drunks who poured out of the nine hotels then in business in Mount Forest The Mount Forest Confederate called on the authorities to take hold of the matter and for the guilty parties to be found out but everyone knew that the identification prosecution and conviction of the perpetrator was unlikely in the extreme The loss of Tanner s woolen mill was a severe setback for the town Tanner was one of the more ambitious men in town and after a major fire in 1875

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/columns.cfm?articleID=1000001652 (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Wellington Advertiser - Elora principal George Edgcumbe ended his career in disgrace
    position was advertised The board voted to interview her at once and offer her 150 salary for the six months remaining in the school year That night was undoubtedly the peak of Edgcumbe s career in Elora A few days later rumours began to circulate that he was involved romantically with one of his students and that it appeared that he may have married her Neither Edgcumbe nor the members of the board would say anything to the press but it was obvious there was something to the stories The board dithered on a course of action during a series of meetings at the end of January 1877 Meanwhile Elora was in an uproar Edgcumbe was only separated not divorced from his first wife The board could not reach a decision on what course of action to take Two ministers on the board Rev Middlemiss and Rev MacDonald both Presbyterians were livid and demanded Edgcumbe s resignation at once The board decided to take no action until its missing member MPP Charles Clarke returned from Toronto In the face of the uproar Edgcumbe submitted his resignation Eventually the board decided to retain him recognizing his abilities as a teacher That did not play well with a number of parents who withdrew their children from the school Middlemiss and MacDonald who vehemently dissented from the board s decision wrote a letter of protest to the board and submitted it to the press for publication In it the ministers claimed the board had to dismiss Edgcumbe at once because his conduct was clearly in violation of provincial statutes that required teachers to be of good morals The other board members meanwhile had contacted Clarke in Toronto who took the matter up with Department of Education officials They agreed that Edgcumbe had to go but were unable to give the name of a suitable replacement Notwithstanding the loud objections of the two ministers the majority of the board wanted him to stay until a replacement had taken over The board decided to advertise immediately for a new principal in the Toronto Globe with duties to commence at once The Elora High School Board met on the evening of Feb 20 to consider any applications that had come in for the principal s position They were surprised that 14 men had applied all of them suitable candidates After reviewing the applications and letters of reference they decided on R A Switzer He possessed an M A and was at the time on the staff of the Oakville High School They requested that he assume his duties on March 1 Out of a job Edgcumbe went on the defensive claiming that an injustice had been done him particularly by Presbyterian ministers Middlemiss and MacDonald He said he was forced from his job In particular he disputed the label of immorality they had hung on him Rev Middlemiss could not resist replying in print with a long winded but well written tome The minister agreed that

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/columns.cfm?articleID=1000001648 (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Wellington Advertiser - Peter Perry a memorable principal of Fergus High School
    as a church warden While he was teaching in Fergus Peter Perry joined the two leading fraternal groups in the town the Masonic Order in which he rose to District Deputy Grand Master and the International Order of Oddfellows of which he was secretary for many years He was also a dedicated worker for the agricultural society Perry did all he could to promote a knowledgeable and well read public He joined the library when it was still the Mechanics Institute supported by membership fees He was a vocal advocate of a public library supported by tax money and he became secretary of the Fergus Library Board when the town took it over holding that position for more than a quarter century He took an active roll in selecting books to add to the collection and in determining to which periodicals the library would subscribe In politics Perry was a staunch Conservative He served as a member of the Centre Wellington Riding Association but never considered standing himself for elected office either at the local or senior levels In his younger days he was an enthusiastic and skilled cricketer before the game of cricket fell out of fashion locally Perry was a competent player of several musical instruments particularly the violin and in the 1890s he took part in concerts put on by various local groups Peter Perry was delighted when construction started on the new Fergus high school which opened in 1929 During his teaching career in Fergus the facilities had always been inadequate and cramped When he came to Fergus the school had but two teachers Before the old school closed Peter Perry was invited back to teach the last lesson in the building Though retired for a decade he still had his old form despite his failing health Dozens of former students packed the school to hear him give his last lessons in Latin and French literature At the opening ceremonies of the new school Perry was a special guest He was deeply touched when a group of his old pupils presented him with a portrait of himself which occupied a place of honour at the front entrance of the new school building Perry s health continued to deteriorate during the late 1920s and he had to cut back on some and then all of his community activities Nevertheless he continued to be one of the best known and best liked residents of Fergus with a big smile and friendly greeting for all he met Eventually in 1930 his health failed to the point were he was no longer able to look after himself He went to Guelph and passed his final days at the Elliott Home He died there peacefully in his sleep on Feb 22 1931 He was 75 years old During his teaching years he gave his students a thorough grounding in Latin and English literature and composition that served them well especially those who went on to university Perry taught Greek as long

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/columns.cfm?articleID=1000001643 (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive



  •