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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Author honours legacy of Aboriginal child activist
    rights of Aboriginal children at the age of 13 after her school had been condemned and permanently closed The closure was due to a fuel spill that contaminated the original building in 1979 It is appalling the fact that the children had a school and it was a beautiful school but it developed a leak and children were getting sick Wilson said A makeshift school of portables was built with a promise from the federal government for a proper school to come However the portables smelled badly and were not sufficiently winterized for the northern climate In 2007 after three different Indian Affairs ministers the government reneged on a third commitment to build the community a new school The book begins in 2008 almost 30 years after the toxic spill In protest of the lack of a safe comfortable school Shannen and her classmates made a YouTube video describing their poor conditions The Students Helping Students campaign inspired the largest child rights movement in Canadian history Koostachin along with her classmates took their fight directly to Parliament Hill Social media and YouTube helped Wilson research the book after Koostachin s tragic death in a car accident I was really able to get a sense of her originality from these videos Wilson said Shannon s friends were very helpful to me too My main concern was what the family would think Her parents were very pleased with this book Also adding information was Charlie Angus Member of Parliament for Timmins James Bay who launched Shannen s Dream campaign an initiative focused on ending the funding discrimination faced by Canada s First Nation school children Education for native children is underfunded by 2 000 to 3 000 less per child per year Wilson said The federal government has now committed to building a new school facility in Attawapiskat by 2013 If Shannen and the children had not launched this campaign this school never would have happened Wilson said It s inspiring and it is way more inspiring that this was a 13 year old child speaking up Wilson has two goals for this book I hope this book gets to First Nation communities It would be good for the children s self esteem she said More than anything I would like Canadians to understand that there isn t equality there is a problem and like Shannen said we need to fix it Wilson also hopes to reach politicians I would like the people of Indian and Northern Affairs to read it Shannen and the Dream for a School is published by Second Story Press It is available at The Bookshelf in Guelph or online at www janetwilson ca December 23 2011 Tweet Tell Us What You Think Login to submit a comment Comments appearing on this website are the opinion of the comment writer and do not represent the opinion of the Wellington Advertiser Comments that attack other individuals or are offensive unsubstantiated or otherwise inappropriate will be removed You must register

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=10685 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Local engineer honoured by university, peers
    this day and thus remains involved with his alma mater It really helps the vitality of the community he said He explained his interest in the energy field began in the 1970s and 80s when experts first realized humans can not forever rely on petroleum and other non renewable resources Even if it s available the earth is not accepting the consequences very well said Lay who after graduating from Guelph obtained his masters degree in mechanical engineering at the University of Waterloo He also worked in Asia as a consulting engineer for Proctor and Gamble and earlier spent one year in Africa drilling wells and working with Togo officials on rural economic development At another gala dinner on Nov 1 in Ottawa Lay joined fellow engineer Tim Dietrich to accept the Tree for Life Award from the Canadian Consulting Engineering Awards on behalf of Enermodal Engineering where Lay has worked since 1997 I was delighted Lay said of his reaction to the announcement though he modestly points out he was but one member of a larger building committee It s a way to spread the word and good exposure for what you ve worked so hard on The awards are Canada s highest recognition for projects by Canadian consulting engineering firms They are held jointly by the Association of Consulting Engineering Companies Canada ACEC and Canadian Consulting Engineer magazine The Tree of Life Award presented to Lay and Dietrich recognized their leading role in environmental stewardship as demonstrated in the mechanical electrical design of the new Kitchener headquarters for Enermodal Engineering The new building on the Grand River was completed in 2009 and is the most energy efficient office building in Canada It uses only 69 kilowatt hours per square meter per year compared with the Canadian average of 380 kWh But there was no sacrifice in comfort and the indoor environment Lay said noting the building is bright warm and well ventilated Actual measurements since its completion indicate it is using 82 less energy and 89 less water than a conventional building The building has received triple LEED Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design platinum certification from the Canada Green Building Council a first in Canada Eden Mills architect Charles Simon has known Lay for over 40 years and says it s nice to see Lay getting the recognition He s both an outstanding person and an outstanding engineer said Simon He s one of the top guys in his field In addition to Lay s professional achievements Simon said Lay has done an enormous amount of work in his community He s done wonderful things outside engineering said Simon noting Lay has been a key part of ongoing plans to upgrade and improve the energy efficiency of the Eden Mills community hall Lay noted over a decade of thought and planning have gone into the proposed upgrades at the hall and he doesn t agree with those village residents who feel erecting solar panels beside the hall

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=10559 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Celebrating 107 years young
    community to live in She added it was the right move for her family I never was sorry to come to Canada You have to work hard wherever you go to make a living Reflecting on her experience of the Second World War in Holland she simply says The wartime was terrible in Holland just terrible Before heading to Canada Grace and John experienced the loss of their infant son Within a year of moving to Canada she would lose another son to leukemia at age 8 My faith is very strong and that has helped me Dyksterhuis said It s not easy having to lose children but I never lost my faith In Harriston she belonged to the Presbyterian Church and then joined the Dutch Reformed Church One of her favorite activities was knitting baby blankets for the missionary organizations abroad As the mother of seven her advice for young families is simple I wish people would slow down Your lives move too fast these days and it s hard when things change so fast With 107 years of change Dyksterhuis understands life moves on but her philosophy remains to take it one day at a time and she still gets up and makes her bed every day not because she has too but because she can I don t look ahead she said I am grateful that I am still healthy and my mind is sharp I know I am in the Lord s hands Dyksterhuis s family is hosting an open house on Dec 3 from 2pm to 4 pm at the Guelph Riverside Reformed Church December 2 2011 Tweet Tell Us What You Think Login to submit a comment Comments appearing on this website are the opinion of the comment writer and do not represent the

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=10526 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Residents still divided on placement of solar panels at community hall
    hydro When all the upgrades are completed Simon estimated the hall could cut its greenhouse gases by 90 When one resident at the meeting expressed concern about the solar panels being too low to the ground Simon said they certainly can be raised Several speakers said the height is immaterial they don t want the solar panels placed on the main street of Eden Mills and said doing so would detract from the heritage qualities of the village Resident Al McBride said the township and the community club which share ownership of the hall should not rush into a plan that isn t complete He said from Simon s presentation it appears residents who walk in front of the solar panels will be wearing them on the forehead Community club president Chris Wilson said delaying the project now would force officials to start all over If we lose our place in line we don t get our promised payment he said referring to the province s MicroFIT renewable energy guidelines Several youths from the village spoke in favour of the hall upgrades including the solar panels but those comments were met with accusations from one woman that the children were planted in the audience by project supporters Coull s plan he explained would still facilitate the installation of solar panels and while it would eliminate the storage room at the front of the building he also proposed a balcony above the parkette be included in the community club plans We re being asked to do this to save a storage room Coull said of the club s plan But another resident called Coull s proposal fantasy and an insatiable money gobbler Laing said the community club s 5 kilowatt solar panel project should be very affordable He said there will be 4 interest charged on the loan with no cost or revenue to the club over 11 years In the 12th year the panels should generate an income of 2 273 Laing said That figure will peak in the 13th year 3 676 before declining until the 20th year though some projects do last longer than that he added Several residents questioned the community club s plan complaining about the aesthetics of the solar panels and a possible decrease in property values that could result from their placement on the village s main street Yet it seemed most people who spoke at the meeting were in favour of the plan and the overwhelming majority agreed incorporating renewable energy into the hall upgrades is a good idea Councillor Doug Breen noted everyone is in the same boat and continuing with that analogy he urged both sides to come together Don t get into a fight over the colour of the boat he said Just paint it and eventually everyone will forget what colour it was before Breen also quipped the township really doesn t want to run the building Simon said in an interview after the meeting preliminary work on landscaping

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=10520 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Speaker to address sustainability, resilience
    all over the world by attempting to reduce its carbon footprint to be as carbon neutral as possible The efforts of the hamlet in Wellington County has not gone unnoticed and has even inspired others Two Toronto neighbourhoods announced in June they too are on the quest to become Canada s first urban carbon neutral communities Almost two thousand households in Riverdale and the Junction officially began their pursuit of carbon neutrality that month Project Neutral led by a group of civic leaders selected the two neighbourhoods to participate in a pilot that aims to convert the communities to carbon neutrality October 28 2011 Tweet Tell Us What You Think Login to submit a comment Comments appearing on this website are the opinion of the comment writer and do not represent the opinion of the Wellington Advertiser Comments that attack other individuals or are offensive unsubstantiated or otherwise inappropriate will be removed You must register or log in in order to post a comment For more information read our detailed Comment Policy and Guidelines Related Stories Carlos del Junco to play Eden Mills fundraiser Author honours legacy of Aboriginal child activist Local engineer honoured by university peers Celebrating 107 years young Residents still divided on placement of solar panels at community hall Speaker to address sustainability resilience Slimmon Fireweed appearing Oct 22 Hopscotch for Hope raises 22 000 for two childrens charities school Hopscotch 4 Hope Eden Mills girls attempt world record on Oct 1 Authors gather for Eden Mills Writers Festival Eden Mills Writers Festival Sept 15 to 18 Step Up 4 Change gets 2 000 Eden Mills church celebrates 150 years Eden Mills church celebrates 150 years Edgewood Camp ready Recent Eden Mills concert raises 3 200 for Japanese Relief The Wellington Advertiser News Opinion Community Deaths Digital

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=10266 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Slimmon, Fireweed appearing Oct. 22
    will be joined by Lewis Melville Fireweed is a trio from Kingston Jamie Campbell Gary William Rasberry and Rob Unger Voice play guitar work and a mutual love of all things acoustic fire the songs they write and perform Fireweed has performed at Blues Skies Music Festival the Ottawa Folk Festival Mariposa Hillside Music Festival and the Amherst Island Folk Festival After a hiatus in which various members lived in other countries they have reconnected and picked up where they left off This concert is a fund raiser for the Eden Mills Millpond Conservation Association The show is Oct 22 at 7 30pm with the doors opening at 7pm at 108 York St There will be Cash Bar with beer and wine Tickets 20 and can be purchased at the door or in advance at The Bookshelf Quebec Street Guelph 519 821 3311 or from Kit Bresnahan 519 856 1188 or kitbresnahan1 gmail com October 21 2011 Tweet Tell Us What You Think Login to submit a comment Comments appearing on this website are the opinion of the comment writer and do not represent the opinion of the Wellington Advertiser Comments that attack other individuals or are offensive unsubstantiated or otherwise inappropriate will be removed You must register or log in in order to post a comment For more information read our detailed Comment Policy and Guidelines Related Stories Carlos del Junco to play Eden Mills fundraiser Author honours legacy of Aboriginal child activist Local engineer honoured by university peers Celebrating 107 years young Residents still divided on placement of solar panels at community hall Speaker to address sustainability resilience Slimmon Fireweed appearing Oct 22 Hopscotch for Hope raises 22 000 for two childrens charities school Hopscotch 4 Hope Eden Mills girls attempt world record on Oct 1 Authors gather

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=10190 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Hopscotch for Hope raises $22,000 for two childrens charities, school
    other disadvantaged communities locally as well The project was inspired when the girls attended last year s Free the Children conference in Waterloo Kory Melnick was excited by the Hopscotch success It was a great event with children supporting children All the awareness and money we have raised is incredible and everyone at Hopscotch 4 Hope did an amazing job she said The event raised more than 22 000 for the international projects and 28 000 worth of in kind support from sponsors high rates of participation and food and silent auction revenue Youth from the village from Rockwood Centennial Elementary School University of Guelph students family friends and neighbours became part of a world wide phenomenon of young activists making change and building an international network of committed young people A special thanks went to Simplistic Lines for assisting in building the course The day of activities included speakers Shawn Shepheard Guelph Eramosa Mayor Chris White Bria Wilbur of Free the Children and Laura Thomas of Right to Play Live music filled the park all afternoon Your Neck of the Woods Brent Freeman and the Tiger Sharks and Fitness Club Fiasco while people tried their hand at a variety of games and activities ranging from stilt walking to hopscotch basketball The Brampton Acro Ropers demonstrated the speedy sport of rope jumping and double dutch too On the Monday following the Hopscotch 4 Hope event representatives of the Kenyan Kisaruni School visited students at Rockwood Centennial Kory Melnick echoed the feelings of everyone who attended I am so excited that Hopscotch 4 Hope was such a huge success she said It was so awesome and I definitely think the event was much more than I or anyone ever imagined Even though the lines of the hopscotch course will fade I

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=10116 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Hopscotch 4 Hope: Eden Mills girls attempt world record on Oct. 1
    including members of their home community and their Rockwood Centennial School community too Beginning at 9 am individual runners walkers and hoppers will take to the course followed at 10 30 am with relay teams that will challenge the course until the noon hour Four pit stops will be in place along the course at every 1 1km It s a timed event for the runners but it s just for fun for the rest of the people who do the course explains Robin You just do what you can and have fun Registration is 35 for individual participants or 125 for a five person relay team Those who registered early will receive a Hopscotch 4 Hope t shirt grab bag food ticket and commemorative Hopscotch 4 Hope stone From noon until 5 pm the hopscotch course is open to everyone to encourage families to be a part of the event whether they can do the whole course or simply want to be part of the day While the organizers are calling this free time they are hoping people bring a toonie donation to support the causes and take part in all the events Guest speakers will include Bria Wilbur outreach speaker of Free The Children a yet to be named representative from Right to Play and Mayor Chris White who will be on site to formally open the event To further support the Hopscotch 4 Hope fundraiser the event is selling square spaces as a form of sponsorship An individual square costs 2 while a ten square board is 15 We ve sold just under 6 000 squares in total to date said Linda who added the event has taught Kamari Kory and Robin valuable life lessons in terms of working with peers finding the courage to ask for sponsorships and to do public speaking It s a large commitment that has paid off before the event has even begun We are really surprised at how generous and supportive people have been said Linda The event has grown and taken on a life of it s own primarily due to the support enthusiasm and willingness to help of those in the community in which we live and we are truly grateful for that We are fortunate to live in a place where people truly do work together to make a difference and demonstrate a leadership that is both visionary and compelling to others to be a part of Added Robin The kids in our village have been so enthusiastic and helpful wanting to get involved painting signs or scrubbing the rocks for the token Hopscotch 4 Hope stones and giving us ideas for the entertainment Local business have gotten behind the Hopscotch 4 Hope fundraiser with either financial support or in kind donations including the day s food vendor Taste Fine Foods of Arkell Canada Dry Motts Planet Bean Coffee Marble Slab Creamery and Terri s Artisan Cakes Corporate sponsors from Wellington County and beyond have also joined in

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=10025 (2016-02-16)
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