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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Dekker family follows environmental farm rules
    with seeing if someone at the University of Guelph is interested in finding out why that is Instead of golf courses Dekker and his son Ryan rent five or six fields from farmers from Moorefield to Tilsonburg up to 20 and 30 acres Farm owners benefit too What he pays can be worth up to more than the crop they harvest Dekker calls it a second income for many of them In the fall after the third cut of hay Country Bait runs a special mower developed by his son Ryan over the stubble and calls in worm pickers Dekker said clover and alfalfa are the best fields for dew worms and Ryan noted rye grass is something they do not seem to like He added some farmers now work worm picking into their field rotation It is quite a sight to see 30 or 40 people the Dekkers hire Vietnamese pickers through an agent on a field Pickers tie cans to their legs one for worms and one with sawdust and strap lamps to their heads Sawdust takes the worm slime off their hands so they do not miss when they pick Each carries plastic bags and special ties when their cans are filled they are emptied into the bags tied with the distinctive tie and left in the field until morning Then they go back and collect the bags and tie them to a pole they spread across their shoulders and carry them to a collection point Each picker is paid according to his productivity and Dekker said grabbing someone else s bags has led to a scrap or two over the years There is some lore in the bait industry that one picker collected 50 000 dew worms in a single night but Ryan Dekker said that has never been verified and he suspects the record is lower He noted though that on May 5 30 pickers harvested 240 000 worms and he called that an average night From the field the worms come to the Dekkers storage sheds are culled and sorted on an assembly line placed into containers of a dozen each and then are ready to be boxed for shipping There are hundreds of flats in the cooling sheds Dirk Dekker said 80 of all the dew worms sold to the United States come from southwestern Ontario and he credits the large amount of clover and alfalfa farmers for that The Dekkers also harvest in the spring if they can find land that is not tilled It is good for picking until it is plowed But most of the picking is done over 20 to 30 days in the fall after crops are harvested Dekker said he has checked the cardboard filled containers with a dozen worms and after a year they are not only alive but lively Country Bait like any farming operation has an interest in international sales Dekker said a few years ago American anglers bought red wigglers from Europe They

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=8972 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Hall revenue tops list of concerns at town meeting
    training to ensure that does not happen Resident Ron Ellis suggested township buildings are over staffed but Whale replied there is no longer staff dedicated to the Moorefield building it is looked after by staff from the PMD arena Some suggested there could be more walking and fitness programs in the hall especially for seniors but resident Cliff Campbell lamented the problem is there is no longer a volunteer workforce on which to rely Several others at the meeting agreed and a few wondered if things continue as they are if it could mean the demise of the community centre We honestly have not considered closing it councillor Mike Downey replied when asked the question point blank That has never been the intent Resident Dan McIntyre suggested township officials need to consider that the Moorefield building should not be viewed as a source of profit but rather as a service they are providing to the community Whale replied it is indeed a service but it would be nice if the building at least came close to breaking even financially Other topics discussed at the town hall meeting include a general explanation of where tax dollars are spent converting all township road signs to read Mapleton instead of the old township names several residents noted there are still many that read Peel or Maryborough the actual cost of the wastewater lagoon system several officials said the cost is about 1 6 million plus a debenture for the land purchase how the new wastewater expansion will affect users in Moorefield and Drayton there appeared to be some confusion whether there will be another capital cost charged to users or whether they would be charged an increased rate or neither whether or not the township is proceeding with water meters Finance Director Mike Givens said the intent is not to proceed unless the municipality receives a grant to help cover the cost the condition of local sidewalks and roads some of which residents said are in terrible shape what the plan is to pay for new industrial land in Drayton Givens said the purchase is covered by the general tax levy and the township will generate revenue upon the sale of that land why the privilege of selling ads on the PMD arena boards was granted solely to one user group without any benefit to the municipality Driscoll agreed with one resident who suggested that showed a lack of initiative on the part of township staff and how grass cutting last summer at a local cemetery plastered grass all over headstones township officials agreed that is unacceptable and noted they have approved the purchase of a rear discharge mower and hope to prevent that in the future Whale told the crowd township officials are not yet certain they have the right format for the town hall meetings which they ve wanted to try for a while now The format would likely be refined over the next few meetings the mayor said Vol 44

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=8841 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Moorefield Optimist tin can bonspiel just a start for club
    plan for the community A few years ago there was a winter festival in Moorefield that was allowed to lapse and he sees the bonspiel as a vehicle for bringing back gradually a full blown winter community event Next year we ll add a few small events McIntyre said before braving the cold to take part in his next game He kept warm with a beautiful tartan tam while tossing tin cans down the ice Entry was 10 per person and each team was guaranteed three games during the day with the event starting mid morning and finishing with the final game at 4pm Joan Zettel of Fergus was part of a team called Rock of Ages and claimed the title of the oldest team in attendance With that age came experience as the team dressed in long warm coats and Zettel managed to play with the wind at her back She loved the event This is a lot of fun she said The winning team was skipped by Moorefield firefighter John Klassen with teammates Tim Bates Ryan Campbell and Dave Benning McIntyre thanked the local firefighters for creating the ice pad and the curling circles and he noted with a chuckle Klassen s team might have had an advantage because they knew the ice Vol 44 Issue 07 Tweet Tell Us What You Think Login to submit a comment Comments appearing on this website are the opinion of the comment writer and do not represent the opinion of the Wellington Advertiser Comments that attack other individuals or are offensive unsubstantiated or otherwise inappropriate will be removed You must register or log in in order to post a comment For more information read our detailed Comment Policy and Guidelines Related Stories Annual Shop with a Cop event a great success

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=8148 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Moorefield student helps raise money for children of Haiti
    part of the experience On Nov 12 I chose to have a dance to help raise money for children in Haiti Shaylen said in a letter to this newspaper It was a great success we raised over 200 She was quick to thank local businesses that supported the dance including Gourlays New Orleans and Drayton Foodmarket as well as the school for letting us use the gym and the awesome support of the staff Thank you to parent volunteers who helped with music set up and clean up and especially the grade 5 and 6 students for taking their time to come out and dance for Haiti Shaylen said in her letter Fellow student Ashley Campbell organized a vow of silence for We Day to recognize the children around the world who do not have a voice Campbell also made a video about the vow and Free the Children Vol 43 Issue 48 Tweet Tell Us What You Think Login to submit a comment Comments appearing on this website are the opinion of the comment writer and do not represent the opinion of the Wellington Advertiser Comments that attack other individuals or are offensive unsubstantiated or otherwise inappropriate will be removed You must register or log in in order to post a comment For more information read our detailed Comment Policy and Guidelines Related Stories Annual Shop with a Cop event a great success Local wins coveted arm wrestling honour Dekker family follows environmental farm rules Hall revenue tops list of concerns at town meeting Moorefield Optimist tin can bonspiel just a start for club Moorefield student helps raise money for children of Haiti Schools get Parent Reaching Out grants Fire destroys building bleachers at ball park Tin can curling revival in Moorefield Residents express concerns about NextEra plans for

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=7599 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Schools get Parent Reaching Out grants
    packed gymnasium one thing parents should realize is It actually is cheaper to buy real vegetables and real food than it is to buy all that packaged stuff She compared human bodies to cars noting both need the right type of fuel So it s important to eat healthy food And that s one of the things our whole school every student will be working on this year That s what our program is all about UGDSB representative Sue Krueger thanked Wilkinson for the grant Trustee Bruce Schieck said during recent all candidate debates one of the questions asked was how the board could better communicate with parents and the three grants will address that question PRO grants support school based and regional projects that help identify barriers to parent engagement in communities and find local solutions to help parents get more involved The grants are locally driven by parent organizations and school councils Alma The funding for Alma Public School will cover an interactive workshop for parents to provide awareness of the style of communication that is most effective with children The workshops will provide tools and resources around emotional intelligence and teach parents how and when to coach or provide feedback Mount Forest In the St Mary workshop parents will learn valuable information on how to be internet savvy The workshop will address why the Internet is so engaging exciting and sometimes addicting for youths Facebook MySpace YouTube Twitter blogs texting and parental controls will presented and discussed Safe communication appropriate social behavior presenting one s image and issues around freedom of expression will also be discussed It is hoped this knowledge will enable parents to be active participants in their child s academic achievement Vol 43 Issue 44 Tweet Tell Us What You Think Login to submit

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=7378 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Fire destroys building, bleachers at ball park
    still under investigation Richardson said adding fire department officials are working closely with the OPP to determine if the blaze was purposely set by someone or if the cause was electrical The latter is the more likely explanation Richardson hinted but he stressed it is now in the hands of the OPP and the length of the investigation de pends on what police determine was the actual cause Several hours after the fire township staff cleared all the debris with a backhoe and brought in sand in preparation for Drayton Moorefield Minor Ball s first ever minor ball day on Saturday The township owned the scorekeeper s building electrical infrastructure and the bleach ers at the park but the scoreboard and equipment stored in the building were the property of the Moorefield Athletic Association Rich ardson explained At a council meeting on Tuesday public works director Larry Lynch said the township s facilities manager is working with the Moorefield Athletic Association on short and long term solutions to the lighting and electricity issues The preliminary plan he added is to re build the scorers booth but at the ground level and not raised with access via stairs like the old structure Vol 43 Issue 26 Tweet Tell Us What You Think Login to submit a comment Comments appearing on this website are the opinion of the comment writer and do not represent the opinion of the Wellington Advertiser Comments that attack other individuals or are offensive unsubstantiated or otherwise inappropriate will be removed You must register or log in in order to post a comment For more information read our detailed Comment Policy and Guidelines Related Stories Annual Shop with a Cop event a great success Local wins coveted arm wrestling honour Dekker family follows environmental farm rules Hall revenue

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=6381 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Tin can curling revival in Moorefield
    start it up again The money raised will go towards Camp Galbraith and to get buses there The weekend event had eight adult teams and two kids teams The kids curled for free and every team earned a door prize as a result of local sponsorships Driscoll said Later on was a roast beef dinner with chili cooked by Optimists with the help of the Opti Mrs Vol 43 Issue 07 Tweet Tell Us What You Think Login to submit a comment Comments appearing on this website are the opinion of the comment writer and do not represent the opinion of the Wellington Advertiser Comments that attack other individuals or are offensive unsubstantiated or otherwise inappropriate will be removed You must register or log in in order to post a comment For more information read our detailed Comment Policy and Guidelines Related Stories Annual Shop with a Cop event a great success Local wins coveted arm wrestling honour Dekker family follows environmental farm rules Hall revenue tops list of concerns at town meeting Moorefield Optimist tin can bonspiel just a start for club Moorefield student helps raise money for children of Haiti Schools get Parent Reaching Out grants Fire destroys building bleachers at ball park Tin can curling revival in Moorefield Residents express concerns about NextEra plans for 12 turbine wind farm Public meeting on wind farm proposal Harron s Rona closing Moorefield location Trees for Mapleton tour of several farms was ruled a success Firefighters selected best posters in county for fire prevention Pigeon King closed for good Moorefield resident still dedicating life to others at age 95 The Wellington Advertiser News Opinion Community Deaths Digital Publications Classifieds Centre Wellington Wellington North Mapleton Minto Guelph Eramosa Erin Puslinch Police Report Editorial Letters to the Editor Columns Cartoon Editorial Policy

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=5383 (2016-02-16)
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  • The Wellington Advertiser - Residents express concerns about NextEra plans for 12-turbine wind farm
    wind farm to the transmission grid along Highway 6 But that did not stop those living in and around Arthur from expressing their concern I don t want anything to do with it said Clayton Tait who lives near the corner of County Road 12 and Highway 9 Despite being told the format of the meeting would be an information presentation with opportunities for one on one questions and not a public question period several in attendance including members of the group Wind Vigilance for Ontario Communities WindVoice started a brief impromptu question period Among the leaders of the session was WindVoice member Lorrie Gillis of Grey Highlands who wants to raise awareness about the alleged impacts turbines can have on human health Most people in this room do not want these industrial turbines in their community Gillis said in an interview According to her 600 turbines operating in Ontario have led to about 100 surveys re turned to WindVoice by nearby residents citing health problems She said there are many more who suffer in silence because disclosing their health problems would prevent the sale of their homes Expropriation would actually be much kinder than the hell people are going through now said Gillis She does not blame land owners or even municipal governments which have very little control if any over the location or approval of wind turbines Gillis said it is the province s Green Energy Act that allows wind farms to proceed despite what she sees as a lack of adequate study That has caused Wind Voice and many groups across the province including Wind Concerns Ontario to call for a moratorium on wind farms until alleged connections to health problems can be properly studied by an independent third party Very little research on the matter has come out of Ontario or even Canada for that matter Some literature from Europe does draw a correlation between turbines and adverse health effects such as head aches dizziness nausea nose bleeds constant ringing in the ears and trouble sleeping Yet many health experts including Rob Thompson Dir ector of Health Protection with the Wellington Dufferin Guelph Public Health WDGPH Unit have questioned the impartiality of such studies In May WDGPH officials asked the Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promo tion to investigate the potential impact of wind turbines on human health But until such an investigation is completed both sides seem to be caught in a catch 22 Wind energy companies and proponents claim there are no studies conclusively linking turbines to adverse health effects and those opposed say there are no studies proving turbines are safe NextEra officials say they understand the health concerns but stress that considering the turbine type the development process the 550 metre setbacks and the acoustic regulations there should be no problems with the Mapleton project Safety is our number one concern said Hernandez add ing NextEra will certainly mitigate any issues that we find Added Geneau Ontario has the most stringent

    Original URL path: http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=4944 (2016-02-16)
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