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  • Site Map - The Westside Gardener
    the Walcherins Let s Talk Lettuce Parsnips Spinach A Winter Lettuce Trial Artichokes New Seeds for 2002 Maritime Northwest Melon Culture Favorite Tomatoes From My Pacific Northwest Garden From the Mailbag My onions are flowering From the Mailbag When can I pick my peppers From the Mailbag How do I control aphids From the Mailbag Green Beans Pole Beans What s the Difference After the flood Disjointed Ramblings Aperture vs Lightroom From the Mailbag Should I worry about contaminants in my organic fertilizer From the Mailbag My tomatoes and squash are rotting at the tip From the Mailbag Do I need to isolate open pollinated corn A Late Blight Myth A Wiseguy s Secret to Successful Transplanting Midsummer Garden Notes From the Mailbag What s eating my Rhododendron Overwintering carrots On buying tomato seedlings especially Territorial s live plants From the Mailbag I started my squash too early From the Mailbag Gardening Beginner From the Mailbag A question about fertilizer Disjointed Ramblings An Open Letter to the Seattle Mariners The Reactionary Gardener From the Mailbag How often do you apply organic fertilizer From the Mailbag Can soap be safely used as an insecticide Disjointed Ramblings Why I m still sitting out the e book revolution How does pollination happen in a hoophouse From the Mailbag Sowing in September From the Mailbag A late start on a winter garden Disjointed Ramblings I ve joined the Kindle Krowd Favorite pole bean snap bean varieties The Robin Harbinger of Ice Growing cucumbers Current favorites plus notes regarding culture Articles Archive Eclectic Stuff A New Visitor to my Garden EPA Consumer Information Sheet on Treated Wood Trav s Garden Tour Page 1 Trav s Garden Tour Page 2 Starting Seeds Indoors Successfully Starting Seeds Indoors Successfully Some Like It Hot Starting Seeds Indoors Successfully

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/sitemap.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Parthenocarpic (definition) - The Westside Gardener
    display requires JavaScript sorry Beit Alpha Cucumber A type of cucumber that originated in Israel Beit alpha cucumbers are usually gynoecious and parthenocarpic This style of cucumber was originally developed for greenhouse production and is generally more productive than traditional

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/glossary/beit_alpha_cucumber.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Gynoecious (definition) - The Westside Gardener
    produce only female flowers Vegetables such as squash and cucumber naturally tend to produce more male flowers than female flowers encouraging the production of female blossoms can significantly increase the productivity of a single plant Note that being gynoecious does

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/glossary/gynoecious.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Parthenocarpic (definition) - The Westside Gardener
    Travis Saling Send questions or comments to e mail address display requires JavaScript sorry Parthenocarpic Having the ability to produce fruit without pollination All contents Travis Saling This page was

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/glossary/parthenocarpic.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Parthenocarpic (definition) - The Westside Gardener
    sorry AAS Short for All America Selections The AAS is a non profit organization devoted to promote new garden seed varieties with superior garden performance judged in impartial trials in North America Each year growers submit newly developed varieties of vegetables flowers and other plants to the AAS for inclusion in their trials Those chosen as best by the AAS are honored as AAS winners More information can be found

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/glossary/aas.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Winter Vegetable Gardening - The Westside Gardener
    Another good cloche candidate Minutina August 10 25 15F 10C Unusual almost succulent leaves Mustard July 15 August 10 15F 9C Hardiness is variable depending on variety Onions Most types August 10 0F 18C Most overwintered onions dry down in June Waterlogged winter soils can be a problem for all overwintered onions Walla Walla sweet September 1 15 Reportedly 10F 24C Walla Wallas dry down in July Scallions June September At least 10F 12C This applies to Allium cepa types of scallions A fistulosum types are much hardier and non bulbing but also are less tender and hotter in flavor Parsnip July 1 15 At least 8F 13C It s fun trying to keep these seeds damp until they sprout Radicchio August 1 Reportedly 5F 15C Leaf types are easier and more reliable Don t dawdle in sowing this one Radishes Through September Uncertain Various rots and soil dwellers spoil mine by midwinter even though the plants are still alive Spinach August 1 15 At least 8F 13C Under a cloche they can be depended on to overwinter These dates are what has worked for me in my garden If you live in a milder microclimate than mine or live further south a later sowing date will be appropriate for many of these For example people down in Oregon tend to sow winter crops later than I do because they have a slightly longer season and more daylight after the equinox A good practice the first couple years is to make multiple sowings 7 10 days apart to help give you a feel for the proper timing at your location which can be important in terms of final plant size In addition some of these plants are photoperiodic and will bolt to seed if sown too early You can get away with later plantings of non bulbing for lack of a better word veggies just don t thin as much But root vegetables and kohlrabi need a certain amount of time to reach a useable state Note that I usually sow the seed directly into the garden If you prefer to raise transplants they should really be started two or three weeks earlier than I have listed Transplanting no matter how carefully done shocks the plant It is sometimes advantageous to raise transplants though either because your garden space is limited or because you find it easier to manage the environment needed to assure good germination Cultural Considerations Dampness In the Maritime Pacific Northwest many otherwise hardy plants will not survive over the winter Why Because our consistently damp winter weather provides a haven for molds and fungi Leafy greens are especially succeptible Escarole for example can easily handle temperatures below 10F but it rapidly will rot if kept constantly damp The solution Raised beds combined when possible with cloches or a PVC hoophouse Raised beds can be elaborate affairs framed with wood or plastic lumber specially manufactured for this purpose In my garden I followed this simple technique which

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/guides/winter_veggies.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Garlic Lovers, Unite! - The Westside Gardener
    easier crops to grow In my experience the biggest problem has been poor winter drainage I grow my garlic in a raised bed for this reason although in an exceptionally wet winter they may still rot Another advantage to using a raised bed is the lack of soil compaction the bulbs find it easier to develop You ve all heard the saying plant your garlic on the shortest day of the year and harvest it on the longest If you live in Southern California perhaps this applies to you Here in the maritime Pacific Northwest though garlic needs more time to develop I like to plant my garlic around October 1 This gives the cloves plenty of time to set out roots and even to develop some top growth I tend to be paranoid so the evidence that the cloves are actually growing is much appreciated You can put the garlic in the ground anytime in fall as long as the ground is still workable If the ground is too cold and wet though the cloves may rot before they can start growing If you plant it late in fall you probably won t see any above ground growth until about the time daffodils start poking up out of the soil Planting garlic is a snap Take your garlic bulb and divide it into the individual cloves but do not peel them if the skin does come off some of them they ll usually still do okay The general rule of thumb is to use the largest cloves from the largest bulbs for planting and save the rest for eating Set the cloves root ends down about two inches into the ground 4 6 inches apart in rows 15 18 inches apart Cover them with soil No fertilizer should be

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/articles/1997/garlic_lovers.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Overwintered Onions - The Westside Gardener
    to develop a vigorous root system which means they grow more strongly on heavy soils In addition overwintering types do most of their growing during spring when soil moisture is plentiful They mature and dry down in early summer when the days are at their longest All these factors add up getting larger onions with less effort Some overwintered onions beginning to form bulbs Since these onions are ready to harvest between June and early July the usually dry weather we receive then is much more conducive to good curing The newer varieties of overwintering onions will easily keep well into fall if cured properly So if you also grow leeks you can have alliums available year round without too much effort Now I don t want to give the impression that these are the miracle byproduct of modern allium science One shortcoming they share with other onions is the less than ideal vigor of the seed Given that you have to sow these during the heat of August this definitely is a concern I do have a couple of tips that should help with growing any onions from seed First make sure you are buying quality seed from a reputable vendor Don t buy them off a seed rack instead mail order them from a quality company and then store them under good conditions Second when you sow them don t cover them back up with dirt Instead use sifted compost seed starting mix or fine grade vermiculite all of which hold water and will not crust over Another potential problem for most overwintered alliums including onions scallions and garlic is the constant rainfall and saturated soil we experience most winters It can be wise to grow any alliums in raised beds to improve the drainage a bit If

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/articles/1998/overwintered_onions.html (2016-04-27)
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