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  • Dill Seedling Photographs - The Westside Gardener
    are several days old At this stage they re very similar in appearance to carrots However when dill first comes up its seed leaves are incredibly fine almost invisible You may not see them unless you re specifically looking for

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/guides/seedlings/dill.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Shallot "Seedling" Photograph - The Westside Gardener
    JavaScript sorry Shallot Sante Okay this one is cheating a bit While seed grown shallots are starting to become available generally what most people do is plant shallot bulbs similar to how one starts garlic except the bulb is not broken up into separate cloves before planting The photo above shows how a bulb started shallot looks when it first begins to sprout All contents Travis Saling This page was

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/guides/seedlings/shallot.html (2016-04-27)
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  • From the Mailbag: Can soap be safely used as an insecticide? - The Westside Gardener
    the trick but now my radishes look terrible I don t think they liked the soap Can all plants with stand water and soap spraying to get rid of ants aphids etc Soap can be a great insecticide but you have to make sure you re using a plant safe soap There are insecticidal soaps available Safer s Soap is one brand You don t mention what soap you used but there can be an issue with using cleaning soaps because they can damage plant foliage It depends on the length of the fatty acid chains in the soap although off the top of my head I don t remember if it s the short chains or the long chains that are the issue It s worth noting that there are several brands of organic herbicidal soaps that are intentionally designed to kill plant foliage Also as you found out some plants are more succeptible than others even insecticidal soaps can harm some very sensitive plants fortunately the problematic plants are listed in the soap s instructions Follow up A second email exchange indicated that the soap used was indeed standard liquid dish soap Also happily the radishes did eventually

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/articles/2010/mailbag_soap.html (2016-04-27)
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  • From the Mailbag: How often do you apply organic fertilizer? - The Westside Gardener
    the season I have used your suggestions for amounts when planting but wondered if you applied it again through the season Unlike water soluble chemical fertilizers dry organic fertiizers have staying power in the soil Their nutrients are released as the fertilizer s components are broken down by soil fungi and bacteria which means they continue to provide nutrition to your plants over the course of many weeks Because of this with organic fertilizers you generally do not have to make multiple applications in the manner that s common with chemical fertilizers at least if you re gardening on the cool soils we have in the Maritime Pacific Northwest So generally speaking I only apply organic fertilizer at the same time I initially sow the seed or move the transplants into the garden One exception to this is with overwintered plants they re usually lightly fertilized at planting time then they ll get a side dressing of blood meal in mid February followed by an application of complete organic fertilizer in mid to late March Of course if any particular veggie exhibits a problem that appears to be nutrient related I will meet those needs by providing more fertilizer calcium

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/articles/2010/mailbag_fertilizer2.html (2016-04-27)
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  • But I Already KNOW How To Grow Snap Beans... - The Westside Gardener
    beans in their gardens Bush types were bred to benefit the canning industry not the home gardener It s true they don t need to be trellised but there are some big disadvantages to bush beans for the home gardener For one thing they tend to produce all their beans over a very short period This means that you must make multiple sowings if you want a long harvest In contrast pole beans only need to be sown once As long as you keep them picked these varieties will keep yielding until they are killed by frost Over the course of a season pole varieties will produce a much larger harvest than bush beans The best argument though is taste Pole beans are so much tastier than bush beans Once you try them I doubt you ll go back There are a number of styles of beans to choose from Everyone is familiar with the traditional round green bean of course The current hot beans are the French filet style which are more slender than typical snap beans Romano beans are flat and broad many people like their texture In addition there are wax beans The real wax types actually have a waxy texture which can take some getting used to It is becoming more common though for the term wax to be used in describing any yellow bean whether it is truly waxy or not A different species of pole bean is the runner bean Phaseolus coccineus sometimes called P multiflorus These fuzzy podded types are delicious as long as you pick them before their seeds develop much The vigorous vines are often more valued for their beautiful red flowers than for the bountiful harvests they produce Everyone has their favorite beans and I am no exception The old

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/articles/1998/snap_beans.html (2016-04-27)
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  • How to Make a Cloche - The Westside Gardener
    the plastic to skin the cloche add about 8 feet to the length of the cloche to allow coverage for the ends So if you re protecting a 9 foot long garden bed you ll want 9 8 17 feet of length Whatever the length is you want 10 of width I buy the 3 mil clear plastic available in the paint section of most hardware stores My garden beds are between 4 and 5 feet across One 10 length of PVC pipe can be bent into a large croquet wicket hoop roughly 5 feet wide and a bit over 3 feet tall The ends of this hoop are simply pushed into the ground as far as they can go This is a lot easier if you first cut the ends off at an angle above photo using either a hacksaw or large pruning shears One side note to any serious croquet patrons I realize your wickets are square not round you don t need to take me to task over that The spacing of the hoops depends on a few things First if you live in a windy spot you ll want the hoops spaced more tightly Also if the rain really comes down hard you ll want that extra support as well If the cloche is being used to mainly provide extra heat during the calmer late spring and summer months the ribs can be spaced at a fairly wide interval My garden beds are between 9 and 10 feet long and I go by this rule of thumb In winter I have five hoops for support assuming the cloche covers just one bed while in summer I ll use three or four Cloches are usually informal structures I simply lay the plastic over the hoops and weigh

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/howto/cloche.html (2016-04-27)
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  • From the Mailbag: Green Beans, Pole Beans; What's the Difference? - The Westside Gardener
    Pole beans are what you d think of as green beans it just means the plants tend to climb and continue to grow which means they keep producing beans over a long harvest period There are also bush beans which are the same type of bean growing on a bushy plant these tend to produce beans all at once and then stop Most of the green beans you buy at

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/articles/2004/mailbag_beans.html (2016-04-27)
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  • The Reactionary Gardener - The Westside Gardener
    This cuts into my available gardening time as you might imagine Now an intelligent person under those circumstances would quickly realize they no longer have time for a 3000 square foot garden but unfortunately we re talking about me instead I am too stubborn or perhaps stupid to downsize which means I m perpetually trying to take care of a large garden in maybe 25 of the time I d realistically need to do so adequately So for the past ten years I ve found myself making last minute garden preparations on a weekly basis for a good part of each year normally by August I m mostly caught up If I want to sow peas on February 21 it s a safe bet I probably haven t dug out the green manure crop or weeds for that matter until the weekend before and that s if I m lucky Lettuce and spinach ready to go outside on March 1 Well then Travis will be prepping the bed by lantern light on February 28th In short Instead of regularly acting according to a plan I m routinely reacting to the calendar in near panic Which leads to this year June 1 is when I like to direct sow my most important winter Brassicas Cabbage and Brussels sprouts need a long time to mature and in my garden I ve found this is the optimal sowing date With some other crops you have more leeway but that hasn t been my experience with these two And as you other Maritimers are already painfully aware we ve seen an exceptionally wet few weeks recently A well prepared gardener would not have too many problems because they would have prepped the bed some time ago or maybe they would ve erected a hoophouse

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/articles/2010/reactionary_gardener.html (2016-04-27)
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