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  • From the Mailbag: What's eating my rhododendron? - The Westside Gardener
    under the leaves The damage you re seeing is being caused by root weevils They can also bother Nandina Heavenly bamboo and strawberries among other things They live in the ground and crawl up the trunk to the leaves during the night A simple way to stop them is to put a 1 2 inch wide band of Tanglefoot a very sticky substance made just for this sort of thing completely around the base of the trunk up a few inches above the soil they ll get stuck in it You need to put it on thick so there are no gaps and high enough so rain irrigation isn t splashing lots of dirt onto it since that ll basically stick to it as well They aren t very big bugs if that sort of thing bothers you If you don t want to do that directly on the trunk tightly wrap a ring of thick paper or cardboard around the trunk and then put the Tanglefoot on that That ll let you cut away the paper and keep things looking a bit neater although unless the rhody is quite young the trunk isn t generally in plain view anyway

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/articles/2007/mailbag_rhody.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Pea Seedling Photographs - The Westside Gardener
    Saling Send questions or comments to e mail address display requires JavaScript sorry Snap Pea Cascadia Pea seedlings viewed from above All contents Travis Saling This page was last updated November 18 2013 Home Quick Looks FAQs Guides How To

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/guides/seedlings/pea.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Claytonia (Miner's Lettuce) Seedling Photographs - The Westside Gardener
    Travis Saling Send questions or comments to e mail address display requires JavaScript sorry Claytonia Miner s Lettuce seedlings Claytonia seedlings viewed from above All contents Travis Saling This page was last updated November 18 2013 Home Quick Looks FAQs

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/guides/seedlings/claytonia.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Minutina Seedling Photographs - The Westside Gardener
    Travis Saling Send questions or comments to e mail address display requires JavaScript sorry Minutina seedlings Minutina seedlings viewed from above All contents Travis Saling This page was last updated November 18 2013 Home Quick Looks FAQs Guides How To

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/guides/seedlings/minutina.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Midsummer Garden Notes - The Westside Gardener
    it s been less than wonderful for the warm season crops I was a bit late putting up my hoophouse so our somewhat frequent spells of drizzle has brought late blight back into my garden Fortunately you can keep this fungus somewhat in check even after infection as long as you are vigilant about keeping your plants dry but the afflicted plants are still less productive and may succumb to the disease if you let your guard back down for even a couple damp days Along that same line this wasn t a good year to be tardy starting my melons I was only a week or two late having sown the seeds in pots on May 24th but our cooler than average summer weather hasn t helped matters Recently I ripped out one bed of melons that obviously wasn t going to produce mature fruit converting it for use as my winter leeks bed Fortunately the remaining melon bed looks like it ll produce ripe melons within a couple weeks Passport is again asserting its value as the most reliable melon in my garden year after year I must say for once I managed to time my vacation well My primary motivation was to avoid at least part of the I 5 construction mess but it s also a busy period in terms of getting my winter garden together The weather s been great not too warm and not too wet My leeks are transplanted a fall bed of lettuce and spinach is finished the hoophouse beds of lettuce spinach mustards and other greens are starting to germinate and grow and I even got my overwintered cauliflower sown somewhat on time All that s left for sowing is a mixed hoophouse bed of snap peas an experiment overwintered onions

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/articles/2007/midsummer_garden_notes.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Transplanting tomatoes tutorial (large video) - The Westside Gardener
    pot A I like to do it because setting the roots deeper means they don t dry out as fast during those long warm spring and summer days which we actually do get occasionally I often do the same thing with pepper plants and with any other vegetable that isn t picky about how deep it s planted which of course excludes plants that grow in a rosette like leafy greens Also tomatoes have the ability to grow roots from any part of the stem that s underground If you re buying your plants at a nursery or garden center you likely will find the plant is root bound too many roots in too small of a space planting deep allows the plant to grow more roots more quickly which may aid survival Q I noticed that when you put the tomato into the ground you held the plant by the stem I thought you were supposed to only hold it by the leaves when transplanting A When a plant is small or its stem is fragile holding by the leaves is a good idea that way you won t kill the plant if you accidentally pinch too hard But at this point my tomatoes are quite tough and have strong stems Q After you transplanted the tomato you didn t firm the soil A Air is necessary for both root and soil health plus compacting your soil is not beneficial in general Q After you transplanted the tomato you didn t water A It s much more beneficial to the plants if you water them before transplanting rather than afterward Also the soil in my garden isn t all that dry right now if it was I definitely would have watered afterward although I d probably wait until the

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/video/transplanting_tomatoes.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Transplanting tomatoes tutorial (small video) - The Westside Gardener
    the pot A I like to do it because setting the roots deeper means they don t dry out as fast during those long warm spring and summer days which we actually do get occasionally I often do the same thing with pepper plants and with any other vegetable that isn t picky about how deep it s planted which of course excludes plants that grow in a rosette like leafy greens Also tomatoes have the ability to grow roots from any part of the stem that s underground If you re buying your plants at a nursery or garden center you likely will find the plant is root bound too many roots in too small of a space planting deep allows the plant to grow more roots more quickly which may aid survival Q I noticed that when you put the tomato into the ground you held the plant by the stem I thought you were supposed to only hold it by the leaves when transplanting A When a plant is small or its stem is fragile holding by the leaves is a good idea that way you won t kill the plant if you accidentally pinch too hard But at this point my tomatoes are quite tough and have strong stems Q After you transplanted the tomato you didn t firm the soil A Air is necessary for both root and soil health plus compacting your soil is not beneficial in general Q After you transplanted the tomato you didn t water A It s much more beneficial to the plants if you water them before transplanting rather than afterward Also the soil in my garden isn t all that dry right now if it was I definitely would have watered afterward although I d probably wait until

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/video/transplanting_tomatoes-small.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Bumblebee flying over rhododendron - The Westside Gardener
    of one particular rhododendron today I really wanted to get a photo of them it s harder than you might think Catching them in a blossom is pretty easy but capturing them in flight and in focus was quite a challenge at least for me I m not going to tell you how many photos I took All I can say is thank heaven for digital Nikon D70 w 18

    Original URL path: http://westsidegardener.com/photos/bee_and_rhody.html (2016-04-27)
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